Blizzard seeks $8.5M from cheat software company Bossland

It's all fun and games... until you start selling software to help players cheat, then it's all lawsuits and court dates.

Blizzard is asking the California district court to pronounce a judgment upon Bossland, the maker of cheat software for World of Warcraft and Overwatch. The game company filed a lawsuit last year against the cheat maker for copyright infringement and unfair competition. Bossland stopped responding to the court, and Blizzard is now asking the court to make a default judgment.

Blizzard claims that Bossland sold over 42,000 hacks in North America, which the studio considers to be worth $8.5 million in damages. "In this case, Blizzard is only seeking the minimum statutory damages of $200 per infringement, for a total of $8,563,600.00," the studio posted. "While Blizzard would surely be entitled to seek a larger amount, Blizzard seeks only minimum statutory damages. Blizzard does not seek such damages as a 'punitive' measure against Bossland or to obtain an unjustified windfall."

The history between Bossland and Blizzard goes back a few years. In May of 2015, Bossland convinced a German court to deny Blizzard's request for an injunction, which prompted Blizzard to sue Bossland's American contractor in a California federal court. That suit was ultimately dismissed, but when said American contractor cooperated with the authorities, Bossland absurdly accused Blizzard of copyright infringement for its acquisition of the Heroes of the Storm StormBuddy bot's source code. Then in 2016, Blizzard sued Bossland again in a California court over its many hacks, including the Watchover Tyrant for Overwatch, accusing Bossland of "attempting to destroy or irreparably harm that game before it even has had a chance to fully flourish" and pulling in potentially millions of dollars in profit.

This past January, Blizzard actually scored a win against the botmakers in a German Supreme Court ruling, which overturned the earlier lower court rulings to determine that Bossland's HonorBuddy bot program for World of Warcraft is in fact in violation of anti-competition laws. At the time, Bossland boasted there were an additional five suits lodged against it.

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17 Comments on "Blizzard seeks $8.5M from cheat software company Bossland"

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agemyth 😩

Only seeking $8.5mil actually seems generous in this case. I assume it is in part because they don't expect Bossland have a ton of money. Bots really do hurt a game's reputation and can dissuade non-cheating players from playing.

I hope Zenimax Online can figure out a way to stop the bots in ESO (on PC at least) :(

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Robert Mann

The one and only thing I do not like in this story is the 'not punitive' part. There should be some pain involved, beyond just having to pay back what you effectively stole, otherwise it just becomes a matter of "Welp, got caught this time and didn't make anything, maybe next time I can get away with it."

It shouldn't be life breaking, but it should hurt.

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Bryan Correll

They don't really need to seek punitive damages. I imagine $8.5 million is enough to wipe out Bossland completely.

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Sally Bowls

I assume from the "Bossland stopped responding" that the Bossland corporation has negligible assets in the US, in which case Blizzard getting an extra trillion dollars in punitive damages would not increase the pain or the zero dollars Blizz will recover.

Reader
rafael12104

Ah, but if they continue not to respond to the court, they could be held criminally liable and of course a default judgement.

In short, it could become punitive.

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rafael12104

Heh. Bossland better have some deep pockets. It's not the judgment you see. It is the fact that Blizz can keep them tied up in court as long as they want.

And maybe Blizz will win this one. Maybe they won't. Doesn't matter really because either way Bossland is taking their sweet sweet ill gotten gains and giving them right back to their attorneys.

So Blizz, as we say down here down here, deep in the heart of Texas: https://youtu.be/lsfXOJIs6zQ

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Ashfyn Ninegold

Blizzard doesn't need a gazillion dollar judgment. Even if the federal court awards them only half, it's enough to keep Bossland from operating in the US because Blizzard can file for those assets to secure their judgment if it remains unpaid.

Abandoning defense of this lawsuit may not have been a good strategical move on Bossland's part.

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Armsbend

Hopefully Bossland is tied to their personal assets. House, cars, life, etc. Not showing up to court indicates that they are immature and probably did in fact not protect their personal assets.

If I worked for Blizz destroying their personal lives would bring me some daily satisfaction.

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Dane Ford

Yea, hopefully they have kids too! That would be great, seeing those little urchins having to march to school shoeless from there cardboard box! GET EM. /sarcasm

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Robert Mann

Yeah, I'm not a fan of taking all they have and leaving them to support families... but I also don't think that limited liability applies (or should) to illegal conduct. Making it hurt is fine, destroying lives over this is not.

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Loki

Not illegal. It's a civil suit.

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Gamie Glasglow

It's time to clean up E-games and get rid of the steroid problem once and for all... wait...

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Darthbawl

I sure hope Bossland isn't thinking "we'll ignore the entire matter and it will hopefully go away." ROFL

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Armsbend

Not responding to the court means the judge presiding will give Blizzard whatever they want within the law. I hope they don't have any assets cause they are gonzo.

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life_isnt_just_dank_memes

I hope Blizz gets the full amount. It stinks for MMO companies in this situation because the appropriate punishment for players who buy these hacks would be perma bans. I just don't think the MMO industry punishes the player base enough with this stuff. Players keep these cheat and hack companies in business.

I'm so tired of certain mobs in MMOs being nerfed because bots and hacks can farm them in abusive ways. Im so tired of Auction Houses having gross security measures in place because of bots.

The two things I'd most like to see improved across the MMO industry in an ideal perfect world that will never happen are: Bot/Hack/Cheat anti-measure improvements and AI improvements to make NPCs and mobs have more interesting behavior. Also, that last one might make escort quests bearable.

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BalsBigBrother

Also, that last one might make escort quests bearable.

Nope, nothing can be done that will make an escort quest bearable other than burning them with fire till they are dead, dead, dead. :p

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Oyjord Hansen

Give them Hell, Blizzard!

Make the cheating bastards pay.

wpDiscuz