Alleged copyright infringer accuses Blizzard of copyright infringement

    
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Because we are no longer friends.

Blizzard is amping up its assault on gold-selling-and-bot-distributing company Bossland GmbH. The World of Warcraft maker was defeated by the German court system back in May when it filed for an injunction against Bossland, which owns and maintains the HonorBuddy, DemonBuddy, and StormBuddy bots that plague World of Warcraft, Diablo III, and Heroes of the Storm.

Undaunted, Blizzard filed a lawsuit against Bossland’s apparent American contractors, including James “Apoc” Enright, this time in a California court. The company alleged last month that “Enright and his team” are responsible for the botting programs accused of violating Blizzard’s copyright and causing “massive harm” to Blizzard’s business in the order of “millions or tens of millions of dollars in revenue and in consumer goodwill.”

Bossland CEO Zwetan Letschew disavowed Enright and the unnamed defendants as “at best random freelancers” at the time, but Torrentfreak, which broke the story last month, now reports that Enright is cooperating to a degree with Blizzard’s attorneys and has “agreed to hand over the source code for the Stormbuddy software.”

Torrentfreak says that Letschew is “outraged that Blizzard took its code” and has now accused Blizzard of copyright infringement. “Today Blizzard acted in a manner as shady as possible for a multi-billion-dollar corporation,” Letschew told its forumgoers, apparently without a shred of irony. “We were informed that the deal compelled Apoc to submit the entire source code of Stormbuddy, which is actually the intellectual property of Bossland GmbH, to Blizzard. […] Blizzard now possesses the whole Stormbuddy source code. There was no permission given by Bossland GmbH, nor were we contacted by Activision Blizzard, nor had Apoc the rights to give out our intellectual property.”

Bossland says it has put a halt to sales of its Heroes of the Storm bot for now out of concern that “Blizzard may take action against the users of its software” (TF’s words), but it said that back in May too, so don’t hold your breath.

And to be clear, we currently have only Letschew’s word that Blizzard has done anything at all. Blizzard has not commented on the case.

Source: Torrentfreak, Stormbuddy forums; image source: Blizzard. Thanks, Agemyth!
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jeremy2020
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jeremy2020

Leilonii CloakingDonkey The consumers paid Blizzard to make it. Should the company that made your car have a say in what color you paint your car?

jeremy2020
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jeremy2020

Flimflamberge ChockFull They should use better means though. Abusing copyright law is not the way to go.

jeremy2020
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jeremy2020

Actintous ChockFull ArbsX be careful what you wish for…while I commend Blizzard’s desire to stamp out botting…I can’t say I’m a fan of the manner they are using to achieve it. Abusing copyright law is a bad way to go about this. They had plenty of other avenues and the unintended consequences of them using copyright law just stop something they don’t like is not a good look. 

That’s not what copyright law is for and this is a clear abuse of that law. They could end up losing and making it harder to go after botters in the future. They’re relying a lot on being the giant with a lot of lawyers.

Necromonger
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Necromonger

And the worste part is that its players like you and me growing this cancer in our games.

Some people buy tons of gold to skip grinding or doing the effort needed to obtain stuff.

Realy sad that people keep this business alive and kicking and made it into a multi million dollar business that keeps growing and growing in every online game.

MikedotFoster
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MikedotFoster

I’ve always been kind of split on the concept of botting. On the one hand, hey, play the game dude/dudette. On the other hand, I don’t much care if someone is running a bot farming levels or gathering materials (anyone who raided during the old days will remember how tempting it was to have a bot do your flask farming). Hell, you practically had to bot to hit Grand Marshal/High Warlord back in Vanilla.
The one thing I do know is that the vast majority of botters and hackers you see are gold farmers working off of zombied or hacked accounts to fill gold orders placed by players. Stop buying gold and you remove a major incentive for all of this stuff (account compromise, hacking, and botting).
Back on topic: I’m curious to see how this plays out. Blizzard absolutely has the right to block people who use a botting program or ban them or lock the program out, but access to the code for the program itself? An interesting twist. I’m not going to try and speculate since it’s way outside my area of expertise, but I will be tuned in.

MikedotFoster
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MikedotFoster

jackofrost  The definition of “irony” has been modified to include its more colloquial use.
But will always stand by this:

Flimflamberge
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Flimflamberge

ChockFull So? It’s still right and important to fight against them.

Flimflamberge
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Flimflamberge

jackofrost “Without a shred of irony” is generally used to describe an action that doesn’t have deliberate irony, but is still plainly ironic from an outside perspective. So yeah, a shady person calling others shady while apparently failing to recognise their own shadiness fits that figure of speech perfectly.

Vagrant Zero
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Vagrant Zero

CloakingDonkey Leilonii  …”our lowest economical (sic) class is your middle class.”

This is why you are tanking the Syrian refugees. So MURICA can continue its sweet sweet DPS.

Ceder
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Ceder

Pirates see a fat merchant ship and decide to attack it thinking it an easy plunder.  The tides quickly turn on them however when they realize the merchant ship far out guns them.

Pirate Captain flees to a dingy and the merchant ship and crew mock them from the bows of their newly acquired ship.  All the pirate captain can do is cry over the loss.

Poor Cap’n Letschew.    Row hard that little dingy.  Row hard.