The Daily Grind: Will you Kickstart any video games in the new year?

    
98

A recent piece on Gamesindustry.biz posits that while there the crowdfunding “bubble” hasn’t burst, the crowdfunding scene, at least insofar as video games, is experiencing decline. Author Thomas Bidaux explains,

“2015 has been an excellent year for Kickstarter and video games, with more than $41 million collected by successful projects. This is a significantly better performance than in 2014 where we saw a decline in the total amount accumulated by games on the platform. […But w]hile 2015 was an excellent year for massive projects (the ones that are raising more than $500,000), what we see on all the other ranges is a decline. While we will end the year with more projects funded than in 2012, this year will be the lowest of the past three years. And the decline is seen in all the ranges of projects, except the small projects below $10,000 in funding. This is not a bubble bursting, as there are still more than 350 projects that are already funded this year. There are actually a good number of studios and creators being allowed to take their project further thanks to crowdfunding, but we are definitely entering a decline phase.”

Check out his data and consider whether you agree. Are we watching a “rich get richer” situation in Kickstarter history? And does it affect you — will you be Kickstarting any video games or MMOs in the new year?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
dorn2
Guest
dorn2

Caec dorn2 
It’s exactly because of the profit that people won’t take a risk though.  You have to understand that crowd funding isn’t really funding.  It’s group purchasing.  It’s not an investment.  It’s payment for services to be rendered.
It’s actually a regression in contracted employment.  Instead of trying to make it an investment we need to look at hiring a third party that manages the development studio.

SwobyJ
Guest
SwobyJ

Nopeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee.

C4de
Guest
C4de

If one catches my eye.

MatthewWard
Guest
MatthewWard

So you think not giving money to indie developers to create vanity projects that will never likely see the light of day commits me to a lifetime of playing console shooters?
I’m intreagued by your logic.

AlexanderDeLarge
Guest
AlexanderDeLarge

Gnomeland Security Research is important. I haven’t been burned on anything so far.

SomewhatEclectic
Guest
SomewhatEclectic

Celestial It won’t happen in 2016 but this far Larian Studios has been a pretty freaking good company for crowdfunding (grain of salt being it’s a sample size of one project and another in the works). inXile’s been pretty good too though they’re running a bit slow.

SomewhatEclectic
Guest
SomewhatEclectic

If I have enough spare money and see either a game that looks good with a good chance of being completed, or a game with a questionable chance of completion but with a sufficiently interesting premise. Granted I’ll donate much, much less to the second type of game than I will the first but I’m willing to possibly lose a couple dollars on the off chance something interesting gets created.

Of course that all relies on actually having spare money that I can afford to donate which probably won’t be for a few months.

DasBenty
Guest
DasBenty

Probably, Grim Dawn was the last one I kickstarted and is close to release and looks good(played a bit of it last week), just waiting on a 3D printer now for the last of my 2015 kickstarters and I’ll be 11/11  for successful projects   *knock on wood*

CloakingDonkey
Guest
CloakingDonkey

LordSolarMacharius CloakingDonkey it’s because NCSoft are complete and total arseholes. They’d rather see the IP rot than release it. Same as with EA and DAoC. There is no sensible reason to keep it under lock and key, they could probably make some money by selling it… 

It always baffles me why anyone would still give NCSoft money after Tabula Rasa and City of Heroes.

Anyway… it was basically my way of saying “There’s not a snowball’s chance in hell that I’ll be getting in on any more video game kickstarters.” I’ll stick with table top games. At least they deliver within reasonable time frames.

Caec
Guest
Caec

dorn2 Well, people are free to use crowdfunding however they wish. I just find it mildly amusing that we’ve somehow gone backwards in the world of business and investments, in terms of businesses now being able to obtain investments that don’t require an uptick in return on said investment. This, after generations of creating a business environment that rewarded investors backing something for a profit via increased returns on said investment. 
I might be less cynical to these for-profit gaming studios using crowdfunding if it didn’t seem like it was more of a cynical sidestepping of basic investment theory. I’m not a lawyer, or economist, and have no idea if there are regulatory hurdles for why that type of crowdfunding hasn’t become a thing (ie: crowdfunding that actually treated individuals like actual investors, and gave them a return on their investment), outside of the cynical one: can it actually get better than getting investor money that requires (assuming you come to market) a flat return? I don’t think so. 
I just think crowdfunding started off as this noble idea, but has been twisted into something entirely different by all these for-profits.