Marvel Heroes’ David Brevik has resigned

VentureBeat is reporting that Gazillion CEO and Marvel Heroes front-man David Brevik has left the company. Interim CEO Dave Dohrmann described the departure as “amicable” and indicated that the studio is seeking a suitable replacement.

Brevik, known for his role as head of Blizzard North and one of the founders of the Diablo franchise, originally joined Gazillion over six years ago to work on the planned MMORPG Marvel Universe, which eventually was transformed into Marvel Heroes.

“Though the time has come for me to move on, I’m excited about the future of Marvel Heroes and look forward to what’s next from studio director Jeff Lind and the team,” Brevik told VentureBeat.

Gazillion offered the site a statement of its own:

“After six years with the company, David Brevik has moved on from CEO of Gazillion to other opportunities. David has played an integral role in the growth and success of Gazillion, most notably leading the development of the acclaimed Marvel Heroes 2015 – and we greatly appreciate his many contributions to the game and the community.”

We have reached out to Gazillion to inquire further about the impact on the game.

Source: VentureBeat
Update: Gazillion PR responded to our request for a game-impact statement:

To answer your question about the status of the game more directly, it’s still very healthy. Marvel Heroes 2016 is currently scheduled to launch at the end of the month with a bunch of new features (Secret Invasion story, controller support, leaderboards, visual updates and more), and we’ll unveil some more new playable heroes for the year to come as well in the near future.

Brevik himself posted a fond farewell message on the official forums:

Almost 7 years ago, I joined Gazillion as the Creative Director for a new Marvel product. I still can’t believe that this dream came true. I have been a life-long Marvel fan and I really relished the opportunity to create a unique and fun Marvel game.

Over the course of the next year, my job really changed. I went from Creative Director to the head of all Gazillion studios (there were many locations back in those days). Slightly after that, I was promoted to President and COO of the company and I became more and more distant from the project that brought me to Gazillion. About six months before Marvel Heroes launched, I became CEO, which is the position I have held for about three years now.

As CEO, I spent most of my time running the company. I played the game a lot, talked about the game a lot and added lots of feedback and new ideas, but that is a very different job than being a Creative Director. After doing this for several years, I really want to get back to developing games and programming. I got into this industry to make games and I miss the day-to-day creation process.

That said, it was difficult, because I love Marvel Heroes. I love our community. I love the team I helped assemble. We have an incredibly talented staff here and I know that the game is in great hands. I believe in the future of the game and I know a lot of the amazing things that are being worked on. The game has some really cool features coming that I know I will enjoy. Yes, I will still be playing the game. Yes, I will still be streaming. I will still be sending the team feedback and information and suggestions. I may not work at Gazillion, but I love this game. I’m very proud of what we accomplished.

As for what’s next, I am going to go indie. I’m going back to doing the things I love most: programming and making games. We will have more information about that in the future.

Thank you team, community and family for a wonderful seven years together. I am so lucky to be a part of such an incredible experience.

Best,
David

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Wakkander
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Wakkander

SoMuchMass Wakkander WuLee1 phoenix0401 Sure, Blizzard absolutely cares about revenue. That doesn’t mean I don’t care about the quality as a consumer. A third rate storyline at best, real money auction house, and busted initial loot distribution among other issues do not get a pass simply because the game sold a lot based on the reputation built by people who haven’t worked there in a decade. Keep in mind the first two games were made by Blizzard North, and the change in studio is evident in the final product.

SoMuchMass
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SoMuchMass

Wakkander WuLee1 phoenix0401  At the end of the day, Blizzard probably cares more about the revenue than “quality”.  McDonald’s type sales is not a bad thing for any company to have.  Diablo 3 had a bad launch and it was ok after that point onwards.  It is a good game that people like to hate.

MetaDune
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MetaDune

Ehh that’s not milking if the expansions are 2-3 years apart

JayBezzOfficial
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JayBezzOfficial

I can appreciate the need for a person to be a creative.  Running a business is a very different work-life than that of an ideas man who gets to program their ideas.

I hope he keeps with the superhero vein because while I am not a fan of the MOBA-like Diablo game.  I am interested to see more things happen in the superhero space as one of the most prevalent type of American literary lore.

phoenix0401
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phoenix0401

breetoplay phoenix0401 MetaDune MorpayneRADIO If you believe the leaked timeline from several years ago, and I do, they had planned two expansions for D3.

Also, it’s more consistent with their more recent behavior. Early Blizzard released one expansion and then largely moved on to the next project. But WoW, SC2, and Hearthstone rely on intensive programming to get a game out, then hang expensive expansions on that initial work. Admittedly WoW and Hearthstone are very different types of games, but SC2 was built to milk money from expansions from the word go. That’s very different than the original SC/WC model.

breetoplay
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breetoplay

phoenix0401 MetaDune MorpayneRADIO  And how many expansions did D2 get?

Wakkander
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Wakkander

WuLee1 phoenix0401 Popularity does not always equal quality, look at McDonalds. No one claims they make the best burgers, but they sell more of them than anyone else.

A single game based on the sterling reputation of previous titles is also likely to sell well, it isn’t until the series takes a hit people become more skeptical. 

Diablo III is not a bad game per se, but it is a definitive step back in terms of replayability, a massive misstep in terms of story, and just wasn’t as fun as its predecessor. It along with StarCraft 2 has shown that Blizzard has lost a step or two when it comes to storytelling, both featuring over the top anime-esque plot lines at odds with the tone and style of their predecessors and which even outside of those shifts are poorly written and conceived.

ihatevnecks
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ihatevnecks

Tridus Armsbend Don’t bother.  Every time someone mentions Pillars of Eternity or the myriad other successful indie game/book/tabletop Kickstarters, Armsbend mysteriously bows out of the discussion.

ihatevnecks
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ihatevnecks

A Dad Supreme You probably can’t convince many people here it’s a win/win; in the mind of most gamers the concept of someone ever leaving their job is some foreign thing that can only point to complete disaster for the company/game that person is leaving.

ihatevnecks
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ihatevnecks

phoenix0401 MetaDune MorpayneRADIO Yeah I loved that second D2 expansion, you too huh? Oh, wait….