THQ Nordic suggests it bought Kingdoms of Amalur and MMO Project Copernicus chiefly for their IP

    
7

When THQ Nordic announced last week that it was acquiring 38 Studios’ castoffsKingdoms of Amalur and MMORPG Project Copernicus – the news was almost buried by the wild pile of other breaking news we had that day, even for people who remember Copernicus and what an impressive MMO it was shaping up to be before the company went bankrupt, engulfed in scandal. Since then, MMO players have been wondering just what THQ is plotting – since the MMO was apparently fairly far along in development, might THQ finish it off and release it?

There may be some clues in a Venture Beat interview with THQ Nordic business and product development director Reinhard Pollice released yesterday. Let’s get the bad news out of the way first: Project Copernicus isn’t even mentioned outside of an oblique reference to the MMO from R.A. Salvatore.

It sounds from the interview as if THQ was primarily interested in the Amalur IP itself both before and after the scandal’s “dust settled” in 2017, and it’s considering new RPGs within the franchise, or even a remaster as VB suggests, though nothing’s set in stone just yet. That’s apparently partly because the RPG originated there.

“Interestingly enough, Kingdom of Amalur: Reckoning started out life at old THQ, as the studio was part of THQ. Back then the project was called Crucible or Project Ascendant […] When THQ sold the studio, the project was heavily reworked to fit Amalur.”

Of course, that doesn’t mean THQ won’t do something with Copernicus, just that the IP seems to be the focal point. There’s certainly more hope now than before.

Source: Venture Beat
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
styopa

Which is funny, because decent IP isn’t that hard to assemble. If Blizzard had bothered, WoW *could* have had very solid, decent lore. Likewise ArenaNet. Not necessarily LOTRO levels of IP, but something cogent, consistent, and interesting just takes a fair amount of focus by the devs ahead of throwing down code and mechanics, so the game is driven by the world, not the other way around.

laelgon
Reader
laelgon

Makes sense, you’re not going to get a ton of use from the actual assets. MMOs already tend to look dated when they release. Just imagine trying to release a game now with art assets from 7 or 8 years ago.

Reader
Castagere Shaikura

I could care less about the mmo. KOA was a great single player rpg. It deserved better than what it got. I really hope they do a remaster with major bug fixes and a fix to that wonky camera that 38 studios never got around fixing because of shutdown. And i hope it gets some new dlc’s for it too. If they do all this i would gladly pay for this game again. The class customization was really great. And the game world was beautiful. My only wish for the game would be a skyrim like level scaling but with a real proper difficulty slider. When you left a zone and went back all the mobs would be gray to you so no xp. Sometimes you would not find hidden quest until you left a zone and read about it later. This would really give it replay value.

Reader
Matthew Yetter

That actually explains why KoA felt so much like Darksiders.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Patreon Donor
Loyal Patron
Ashfyn Ninegold

That bit of information, that old THQ was involved in KoA explains the motivation for THQNordic. They seem to be picking up inactive IPs that members of their team worked on.

It would really be grand if they give KoA the Titan Quest do over. It’s a solid RPG with good combat in a huge open world. And, IIRC, not top down. We don’t get a lot of those.

Sorry about Copernicus, but excited for KoA possibilities.

Reader
flamethekid .

I’m only excited for this simply because kingdom of amalur was an amazing RPG that would have won out over skyrim if not for the fact that it came out first and has extreme modifiability

Reader
McGuffn

Was it really impressive? It had nice concept art, considering the pedigree of the people behind it. And the shots of the city with the dam or something behind it. Which was pretty pedestrian, and I don’t mean walkable.