dark age of camelot

Official Site: Dark Age of Camelot
Studio: Broadsword Entertainment/EA (formerly Mythic)
Launch Date: October 10, 2001
Genre: Mythological Fantasy RvR Themepark
Business Model: Subscription (Cash Shop)
Platform: PC

The MOP Up: Gamescom’s big opening by Angela Merkel (June 25, 2017)

The MMO industry moves along at the speed of information, and sometimes we’re deluged with so much news here at Massively Overpowered that some of it gets backlogged. That’s why there’s The MOP Up: a weekly compilation of smaller MMO stories and videos that you won’t want to miss. Seen any good MMO news? Hit us up through our tips line!

This week we have stories and videos from MechWarrior OnlineMu OriginDark Age of CamelotAstellia OnlineMarvel End Time ArenaRagnarok Online, and Guild Wars 2, all waiting for you after the break!

Read more

Dark Age of Camelot prepares new Mithril currency shop

What’s going on over in Dark Age of Camelot land? For that you’ll have to turn to the latest Q&A grab bag with the developers. Among the topics discussed, the devs gave some word about the next patch for the game — and something special that’s coming with it.

“We have a 1.123B version coming very soon to Pendragon that will have additional class changes to several classes that didn’t make it into the 1.123A notes AND tweaks to several of the changes made in 1.123A based on your feedback,” the team said. “Additionally, and the reason for the wait thus far, is that we are also introducing the new Mithril currency and shop. We were able to squeeze in an armor, cloak, and weapon ‘patterning’ system that will allow characters to copy the look of their existing items onto their other items (with some restrictions)!”

The team also fielded questions about resource crate changes, the myth physical defense stat, and scaling the UI to higher resolution monitors.

Comment

Elder Scrolls Online’s Matt Firor on Morrowind, Dark Age of Camelot, and the old days of MMOs

Ahead of E3, ZeniMax’s Matt Firor sat down with Gamasutra for a streamed interview on The Elder Scrolls Online, focused chiefly on Morrowind. It’s a bit of an odd interview, as the publication kicks things off by characterizing the game as a F2P title and suggesting that the MMORPG genre hasn’t seen a paid expansion in a long time, which may surprise those of you playing SWTOR, World of Warcraft, Guild Wars 2, or Final Fantasy XIV. But Firor weathers the question, explaining that Morrowind is intended as a jump-in point for players who’ve never jumped in before, and yet it’s accessible for vets too.

“In the old days, what we did is we brought out an expansion, and the only people that bought it were experienced players because you had to be X level in order to buy it an enjoy it,” Firor explains. “That’s the difference between Morrowind and those days. Anyone can just jump in and have fun.”

He also touches on the differences between the era of Dark Age of Camelot and Elder Scrolls Online (hint: It’s about grind). It’s a long stream but worth it for Firor’s commentary.

Read more

The MOP Up: Revelation Online’s monthly challenges (June 4, 2017)

The MMO industry moves along at the speed of information, and sometimes we’re deluged with so much news here at Massively Overpowered that some of it gets backlogged. That’s why there’s The MOP Up: a weekly compilation of smaller MMO stories and videos that you won’t want to miss. Seen any good MMO news? Hit us up through our tips line!

This week we have stories and videos from Black DeathHellionAstellia OnlineOverwatchDayZPirate101Armored WarfareAionElder Scrolls OnlinePath of ExileDungeon Fighter OnlineWurm OnlineRevelation OnlineOsiris: New DawnDark Age of CamelotAge of Wushu 2, all waiting for you after the break!

Read more

The Game Archaeologist: How Sceptre of Goth shaped the MMO industry

When it comes to text-based MMOs created in the ’80s, ’90s, and 2000s, the sheer number of them would blot out the sky. There are certainly more multi-user dungeons (MUDs) than I’ve ever been able to get a handle on when I’ve tried creating lists of the most important to know, but I will say that there are a few that seem to pop up more than others. The original MUD1, created by Richard Bartle and Roy Trubshaw, was certainly a watershed moment for online roleplaying games. Learning about DikuMUD is pretty essential, considering its impact on graphical MMORPGs that we still play today.

But there’s another title that often goes unnoticed, unless you keep an eye out for it. It’s a MUD that keeps popping up when you look into the history of the MMORPG genre, one with ties to key players and design concepts that are still active today.

It’s the MUD that shaped the MMO industry, and it was called Sceptre of Goth.

Read more

Dark Age of Camelot’s Dragon’s Curse campaign moves into its second chapter

Evil rumors and foul deeds continue to ramp up in Dark Age of Camelot. The RvR MMO moved into the second chapter of its A Dragon’s Cruse campaign on Tuesday, expanding the open world dungeons that debuted in the first chapter.

Chapter two unlocked the full potential for these new dungeons, giving players more to do and see as they seek to uncover the truth behind recent events. There are several new dungeon quests available, including solo quests, small-group elite quests, large-group battlegroup quests, variable group size campaign quests. The vendors servicing these dungeons have new offerings as well.

A Dragon’s Curse is a planned year-long story arc in DAoC that will conclude in December. The third chapter is scheduled to arrive on May 30th.

Comment

Massively Overthinking: Are MMORPG players a minority in their own genre?

Deep in the comments of the MMOs-vs.-survival-sandboxes thread from last week, reader miol_ produced a beautiful comment about how MMO players have become a minority in their own genre, which he then expounded upon for us in this provocative email.

“I’ve reached the opinion, that since the launch of WoW and its clones, the ‘original’ MMO-playerbase became a minority in their own genre. Before, we were but hundreds of thousands of MMO players, but then came Blizzard with WoW and its legions of fans in the dozen of millions at its peak, starting to dictate what the new success of MMOs should look like. Even if we others tried to vote with our wallet and feet, we became a minority, having only a fraction of our initial influence, while many devs tried desperately time and again to find ways to get at least a portion of the new Blizzard playerbase.

“Am I wrong with that perception of history? Am I totally missing something? Or are ‘we’ are slowly becoming a majority again, now that WoW and its clones are seeing steadily declining numbers (instead of us winning more players to ‘our side’)? How do we lobby better for ‘our cause’? Or can we only wait and see, until the genre is small enough again? Or is it too late? Have we ourselves grown too far apart into our even more niche corners of personal taste since SWG, while production costs and our demands for production value have skyrocketed at the same time? How could we come closer again?”

Let’s tackle miol_’s questions in this week’s Massively Overthinking.

Read more

Dark Age of Camelot welcomes back old players, Ultima Online discusses summer updates

Broadsword’s keeping fans of its MMORPGs Dark Age of Camelot and Ultima Online busy this week!

Dark Age of Camelot is running a Come Back to Camelot campaign this spring — former players may already have gotten invites in their inboxes. The caveat is that your account must have been off for 60 days for you to pick up an invite, and you get your free 30 days only if you reactivate.

Meanwhile, Ultima Online has announced in its most recent newsletter that publish 97, which we wrote about just a few days ago and includes the huge overhaul for the popular animal taming skill set, is now set to go live on April 27th. In fact, work has already begun on publish 98:

Read more

Crowfall’s destructible castles are hungry hungry hippos

One of my favorite early MMORPG PvP memories is from Dark Age of Camelot, where I liked to position my Huntress atop my side’s keep battlements to fire down on the Hibbies and Albies swarming below. But of course, we didn’t build that keep; we just claimed it, so losing didn’t hurt much beyond our pride. In Crowfall, however, you’re going to have to rebuild and hold the strongholds you’re fighting over in the game’s Dying Worlds campaigns.

ArtCraft Associate Producer Max Lancaster has a dev blog out today explaining just how it’ll work. “Strongholds will use a capture-and-rebuild mechanic,” he says. “In these worlds, players will fight over the ruins of existing castles and will need to collect resources from neighboring ‘points of interest’ (POIs), specifically mines, mills and quarries, to rebuild the defensive structures in those strongholds. These POIs will be heavily disputed, so be prepared to fight to gain (and maintain) control of them. This is done by ‘feeding’ resources into what we call hungry spawners.”

Read more

Dark Age of Camelot beckons adventurers to a new dragonish campaign

An undead threat. A clutch of dragon eggs. Buried treasure. An unnerving disturbance.

All of these are portents of Dark Age of Camelot’s latest campaign, A Dragon’s Curse. As with DAoC’s past campaigns, this one is being rolled out in stages over several weeks. Currently, players can go through the prologue and first chapter. Each faction has their own storyline and take on the events, and soloers should find that pretty much all of the campaign is doable by a single player.

As part of the first chapter of the campaign, DAoC has opened up a trio of new open world dungeons (one per faction). Heroes can plunder the depths of these for Aurulite, which can then be spent at vendors for new rewards.

Read more

April Fools’ Day 2017: Hijinks across the MMOverse

If you don’t like tricks and jokes, just stop reading right now, turn the lights off, and go climb back into bed. Nothing on the internet is going to bring you joy today, so just sit this one out. Trust us.

For everyone else, there’s April Fools’ Day! Follow along as we rattle off all the great MMORPG pranks and events we’ve found so far this morning.

Read more

Dark Age of Camelot developers are looking to clean up unused games and general balance

It sucks when you have a great idea for a character, but all of the names you’d like to use have been taken. That’s a problem particularly affecting Dark Age of Camelot at this point, but the developers confirm in the latest community Q&A that the team is definitely considering freeing up unused names on unplayed or particularly old characters. The staff is also holding off on another Come Back to Camelot campaign until more balance concerns have been addressed, with a potential new rulest server in the works to give player population a shot in the arm.

The developers also addressed some mechanical questions, laying out the soft and hard caps for various stats and pointing out that many understood soft caps really do allow for more variation. There are also more hidden skills for some dual wielding lines, although those hidden skills shouldn’t substantially alter damage dealt. Check out all of the answers for the full rundown.

Comment

1 2 3 10