How ‘Gamer Motivation Model’ researchers slot MOBAs on the strategy map

    
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How ‘Gamer Motivation Model’ researchers slot MOBAs on the strategy map

This winter, we’ve been chronicling the escapades of Nick Yee-founded game analytics consulting firm Quantic Foundry, which published what it’s calling the Gamer Motivation Model. Researchers compiled user-submitted profiles from thousands of gamers to develop a sort of modern Bartle quotient that groups gamer types into three “clusters of motivations” rather than the standard socializer, achiever, killer, explorer archetypes. Earlier this month, we invited our readers to take the test along with us to see how we fit into the greater gamer curve and understand how the model ranks us.

Yee’s most recent post on the project shows how the aggregate data might be used from a game development perspective rather than just to amuse curious gamers.

“[I]n the survey, we also ask gamers to list their favorite game titles. This allows us to pivot between gamers and games – we can use the aggregated game audience profiles to compare games. For example, is Civilization more strategically complex than SimCity? Well, we can compare their audience Strategy scores to find out. In this sense, the Gamer Motivation Profile isn’t just a benchmarking tool for gamers, it’s also a benchmarking tool for game titles.”

His team has mapped strategy games — from Master of Orion to League of Legends — on a promixity map with axes representing scales of excitement and strategy in order to show how gaming genres relate to each other. Intriguingly, there are basically zero high excitement/high strategy games; Yee argues that it shows “a cognitive threshold beyond which forcing you to make complex decisions under time pressure is simply not fun anymore.”

I’m probably not alone in wishing they’d show some MMO- and sandox-related research next. I wonder where the “cognitive boundary of fun” sits for MMORPGs?

Source: Quantic

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Sorenthaz
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Sorenthaz

Karl_Hungus Sorenthaz Yeah basically all the popular/big MMOs are the ones that make people feel like every 30-60 minutes they spend in the game results in notable progress/accomplishments.  Whether it’s doing dailies to get another 300g and a bunch of reputation or simply doing mindless quests to move that experience bar further or nabbing an achievement for nearly dying from fall damage, MMOs have created a truckton of ways to stimulate players and amke them feel like they need to hop in and devote at least a bit of their daily time into stuff.  In WoW for example garrisons have streamlined that to ridiculous degrees where you only have to hop in for like 3-5 minutes in order to feel like you did something good (i.e. I often hop in to get a large sum of gold off of garrison missions daily).

Karl_Hungus
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Karl_Hungus

Sorenthaz 
Sounds about right to me

h4
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h4

It seems strange to me, that mobas such as LoL and Dota are low in the “strategy” axis. While the 4X & grand strategy games that score highly are certainly longer games with more management involved, I do not believe that means they are higher in “strategy”.

Wouldn’t it be simpler to label the y axis “game pacing” (0=turnbased, high=twitch reflexes) and the x axis “volume of information”?  (0=minimalist game, highest=tons of information) If so, then obviously the upper right area would be lacking in games as few people are actually interested in a twitch-reflexes speed game with grand strategy volume of information. This also avoids the problems with different people’s interpretation of “excitement” or “strategy”

Robert80
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Robert80

I wonder where Allegiance would rank on that.  I mention it because there was a lot of strategy involved at the highest command level in any given game, but most of the players were off running action.
Maybe Eve would be another game to look at there, given that somebody has to work the battle plan while everyone fights.

Damonvile
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Damonvile

I’m not sure how valuable this even is as a tool when your avg person goes in with a “clear” idea of what they expect out of it and if it doesn’t match what they already believe they just write it off as “getting it wrong”

Personally I think if you know exactly what you do and don’t like and there are no surprises….life must be super boring for you.

Greaterdivinity
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Greaterdivinity

Samizdat You forgot the eggplant emoji.

Samizdat
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Samizdat

Is this like the new Myers-Briggs or something? Is everyone going to start putting it on their dating profiles next to the winky face and clicking wine glass emoji?

Sorenthaz
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Sorenthaz

I wonder where the “cognitive boundary of fun” sits for MMORPGs?

That’s probably a lot more complex since there’s a lot of different elements.  But I’d guess something like mid-low strategy, middle challenge-wise, and high in achievement or something similar to that is the sweet spot.