Tencent helps Chinese law enforcement arrest 120 people linked to PUBG cheats

    
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If you thought Epic Games was being too rough on cheaters in Fortnite by smacking kids with personal lawsuits, wait until you hear what Tencent is up to. The Chinese gaming giant is preparing to (officially) launch PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds there (yes, it’s already playable there via Steam, but in early access). And ahead of that, it’s going after cheaters, specifically the cheat vendors – hard.

Bloomberg reports that the company has worked with Chinese police to arrest 120 people as part of 30 different cases involving cheat programs for the game. According to the publication, the company is trying to crack down on the hacking that pervades its games, specifically PUBG; those convicted under Chinese law could be sentenced to several years in prison, in addition to fines (and yeah, it’s happened before). So maybe don’t be a hacker targeting a megacorp’s video game in China.

In other news, Tencent just inked a deal with LEGO to “jointly develop online games and potentially a social network aimed at Chinese children.” Don’t get too excited over a third go at a LEGO MMO, however; it sounds more like they’re working on a “video zone,” kid-oriented social network, and a building toolset called LEGO BOOST.

Source: Bloomberg via VG247Reuters via GIbiz
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Utakata

A sign where business and the state have way too close of a cozy relationship. /bleh

Mewmew
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Mewmew

Sort of like any time the MPAA or Music Industry goes after anybody in the USA.

Anyway if they want to shut down the Cheats, and it’s actually an illegal thing of this magnitude there, how are they supposed to do it other than working with the Police? They’re not making the rules or laws, they’re just helping to point the Police where to go and find these people.

Sure, it may seem a bit shady, but again it’s the same with the MPAA or Music Industry in the US. The MPAA even bribes other countries to get involved, which is beyond shady.

The cheaters are costing the companies and legitimate players a lot of money. I don’t see them working together with the Police to get rid of the stuff as a bad thing, unless you’re a cheater that is (or especially someone making and / or distributing the programs that let you cheat).

To me this is a good thing. It’s taken too light heartedly in the USA. We need to go beyond the time of bans and blocks and make bigger moves if we really want to make a dent in this stuff.

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Dystopiq

And they were never heard from again!

Veldan
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Veldan

I like this. The creators / distributors of cheats (not merely the people who cheat!) cause serious damage to a game. It’s legally and morally wrong, and the days of “it’s just a video game” are long gone. Video games are as serious an industry as any, billions of dollars go around in it, millions of people work in it. It’s only normal that law enforcement starts treating it more seriously.

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Bruno Brito

You don’t want to envolve enforcers and gaming. Trust me.

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Melissa McDonald

Arrested for cheating in a video game. The world has gone completely mad.

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A Dad Supreme

Short list of things that can get you arrested in Singapore:

1. Chewing gum
2. Spitting
3. Feeding pigeons

A lot of the value laws around the world don’t necessarily translate into a world gone mad, but more of a “I better not do that thing there”, because those people don’t like that.

I’m pretty sure hacking video games in Russia and other Eastern European countries is not only accepted and widespread, but wouldn’t be considered a big deal at all even if it was technically illegal somewhere under their law.

China though, apparently doesn’t play around anymore.

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rafael12104

Been there, and yes. All of what you site is true and they aren’t kidding around. They enforce their laws. And they are not legal corporal punishment. Yeah, whipping you with a damn cane made of bamboo (I think it’s bamboo).

Singapore is a beautiful place. It is a city state, and as you drive in from the airport it is a wonder to behold. Public works projects are obvious and there isn’t one centilla of ugly much less litter.

BUT, you can’t screw around. No littering, no spitting etc. You step out of line, they will step into you.

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Bruno Brito

Doesn’t sound so beautiful after all.

K38FishTacos
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K38FishTacos

I’ve had a police officer in Orange County, California (in the US) say “I’m sorry. I thought you were Mexican,” after pulling a gun on me at a traffic stop. “You didn’t look like you belonged here.”

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rafael12104

It’s China. I bet people have been arrested for much less. BUT you are not wrong. The world is a mad place.

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Knox Harrington

Asians take their gaming very seriously

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Dividion

I’d put this in the same category as someone who goes into a movie theater and alters the film, or hacks into a TV station and changes the programming. This affects other customers. It’s disruptive to those who have paid money for the product, and possibly harmful to the reputation and bottom line of the companies that built the product. It shouldn’t be tolerated, and that’s a lesson that needs to be instilled. The hackers are obviously talented, and that talent needs to be redirected to something productive. Maybe the next generation will learn from this and be better for it.

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Dystopiq

The game is a business. They’re disrupting that business.

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kgptzac

More like arrested for making cheat software and sell them

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rafael12104

One more thought. Why would cheat in PUBG? You don’t really get a chicken dinner and you get no benefits in gear, stats, etc for the nex game. LOL

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van_glorious

Some men aren’t looking for anything logical, like fair-play. They can’t be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn. XD

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Sally Bowls

Regardless, look at it this way: PUBG was designed to attract the customers most likely to want to cheat. My thesis is that the people who, instead of playing a cooperative game, are playing a kill everyone else game are more likely to want to seek an unfair advantage. Not all or even most PUBG players ofc.

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rafael12104

What the… LOL!

Wow. Well, ok. That’s one way to deal with it. And it sure does bring a smile to my face.

Now, if they could only start arresting the gold farmers. Go China!

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Life_Isnt_Just_Dank_Memes

I don’t like government regulation of entertainment, but when can we expect game makers to actually counter cheaters properly in online games and MMOs? I’ve yet to see a game maker do it well. Same goes for gold sellers. Lots of games don’t even have robust anti-cheat reporting software. That is one thing consoles have going for them. You don’t have to deal with a lot of those headaches.

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Arktouros

“What are you in for?”
“Murder, you?”
“Cheated in PUBG.”
“Whoa I don’t want any trouble bro…”

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rafael12104

Lol! My first laugh of the day. Thanks!

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Zora

In the nineties, the Max Headroom TV serie postulated by 2008 misappropriation would earn sentences worse than murder. Reality as usual surpasses fiction…

Will they be asked to pay for the bullet if they get sentenced to execution?

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Armsbend

I seriously am looking forward to China’s government and culture to start spreading to the west. I hope I’m alive to see it and I hope it doesn’t involve too much short term bloodshed. I’m looking forward to the long term bloodshed though.

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BalsBigBrother

Sometimes I read your comments and I don’t ……..

I donteven.gif
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rafael12104

He hasn’t had his coffee yet, and is in the midst of an ice storm. Meh. It happens. LOL

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squid

I think he’s talking about all the executions and organ-harvesting that goes on in the Chinese justice system.

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Rolan Storm

Yeah. :D :D :D

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Bruno Brito

Edgy.

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Armsbend

Historical.