Anthem player learns why you don’t break NDAs. Or why you don’t use Origin. It’s one of those.

    
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With the line between live and beta in online games blurring more and more by the year, it’s no wonder some folks have gotten accustomed to not taking their NDAs on closed tests any more seriously than your average headstart. But back that truck up because it really can matter, as a gamer in Anthem’s closed alpha learned this weekend.

According to YouTuber LiveFails, when one tester attempted to stream Anthem on Twitch this weekend, EA shut him down and them blanked his entire Origin library. Here is where you make a joke about having enough games in an Origin library to even matter. Or possibly where you wonder whether maybe we haven’t given these companies a tad too much power over what we “own.”

The whole thing seems extra pointless since the open beta starts February 1st and there’s a VIP demo a week before that. Being first to stream something clearly not yet ready for prime time doesn’t seem worth the steep cost.

Source: Comicbook.com. Cheers, Apparition.

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anarresian
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anarresian

Sign me up under the “maybe we have given these companies a tad too much power over what we “own.” heading.

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Arktouros

This is a big reason why I plan to make separate accounts for any online game associated with these things anymore. I couldn’t imagine getting banned in New World and losing access to all my Amazon stuff or imagine getting VAC banned from some shitty macro program and losing things. Just crazy.

Mewmew
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Mewmew

But… That’s not what actually happened. The article is technically correct, but very misleading. The one and only thing he had in his Origin Library was Anthem, the game he broke the NDA for. So yes, technically he lost his “entire Origin library” but realistically his entire library was one game, the one he was banned from. He didn’t have even one other game that got wiped out because he only had this one game in his library.

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Robert Mann

NDAs exist for a reason. You agree to them. If you decide to break them, and the company takes action, then all I can say is good. Stupid should hurt, and for too long game NDAs have had the impact of a person blowing against the side of a mountain (aka, jack-all).

As to the report, he had no other games on the account, but HOPEFULLY they collected his name and blacklisted him from any testing for the future.

Mewmew
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Mewmew

Technically they did blank his entire Origin library, because his entire Origin library consisted of the one game he was banned from :P

So sadly it’s technically correct and they don’t have to post retractions even though it’s not actually at all what the articles are making it sound like.

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GiantsBane

Yea, it’s what we call overhyping a situation for sensationalist click bait articles by taking the information purposely out of context. Like you said, it’s not false, but conveniently left off a very important and relevant detail that pretty much makes the story irrelevant and boring.

Dumbass gets banned for being a dumbass, end of story.

PurpleCopper
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PurpleCopper

Imagine everyone making dummy accounts and attempted to stream Anthem.

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Rumm

TWITCH was banning people too, not just EA. I saw numerous streams disappear into the void on Saturday when they were spamming Enter trying to get into the server.

They don’t want people using their platform the break NDAS, especially when EA is the Publisher.

Veldara
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Veldara

I looked more into this, and this guy being some no name streamer that did this on some dummy account for the views. Pretty sad the lengths some streamers will go to for some spotlight.

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Armsbend

Pretty smart considering the money some of them make. If I decided to be an entertainer by streaming there is almost no legal length I wouldn’t go to to make what the big ones make.

Who cares about an NDA from some company that treats it’s customers like trash floating down the street. Using Electronic Arts for whatever means I felt necessary to obtain my goals would not register one iota on my morality scale.

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traja

Yeah it’s really difficult to see this as a moral issue. It is a personal risk to some degree but breaking an NDA is hardly an inherent evil. After all the NDA in this case is nothing but a tool to try to control the media around the game.

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Robert Mann

Lying isn’t a moral issue, then? It’s an agreement, you offer your word not to release information.

So yes, it is a moral issue.

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traja

Lying indeed is not an inherent evil. There are many good reasons to lie, and many bad reasons to lie, and many neutral reasons to lie. This is someone lying to a multi billion dollar corporation for personal gain. Corporation that itself lies all the time. To me that is morally neutral.

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Robert Mann

This is lying upon an agreement, which means one’s word cannot be trusted. It is completely different than a white lie, or something neutral, to me.

Alas, some believe that two wrongs make a right.

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traja

Going against your agreements is also not an inherent evil. Let’s say that you signed an agreement to murder your sister, in a society where such a thing is binding. Would it be evil to betray that agreement? No, of course not. It would be evil to not betray it.

Yes this is an exaggeration but it is to demonstrate that lying is not necessarily an evil thing despite there being agreements involved.

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Robert Mann

Yeah, completely different thing when you lie about committing to a criminal action. That’s so far out of context here, that it is semantics. It’s true, but it just is not applicable to the scenario.

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traja

I clearly specified that this would be in a country where an agreement like that is binding. It would then have to also be a legal action to take.

Your argument has to be able to stand the test of a hypothetical. In this case you argue that breaking an agreement is always an evil thing. For that to be valid it must be impossible for me to come up with a hypothetical where you would think that not following the agreement is moral.

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Robert Mann

The agreement to do something and then not is still an evil. It may be the lesser evil compared to following through, but it remains an evil… unless you have no choice but to accept in order to stop the greater evil.

That does NOT apply to something like an NDA at this point. Should that situation ever come up, maybe with testing hardware for brain-linking virtual reality devices or something, then you have a possible, although highly unlikely, point. Until then, there’s nada that applies to this in that way. (And that considers that you still HAVE to sign an NDA, which you never have to do… I have yet to see be notified of somebody being held on threat of death if they do not agree to an NDA.)

A hypothetical must be reasonable, and apply to the situation at hand, to matter to a debate like this. Yours is reasonable, but it does not apply to the situation at hand. Thus why I said it doesn’t matter.

Alex Js.
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Kickstarter Donor
Alex Js.

sad the lengths some streamers will go to for some spotlight

Just as sad as all the copypasta “journalists” who provide that spotlight ;-)

Mewmew
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Mewmew

And then they gain 15 more minutes of fame pretending they had a full library of games wiped out, which the gaming sites just go ahead and publish articles about as if it’s true. How embarrassing for the gaming sites :P

Xijit
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Kickstarter Donor
Xijit

Yeah, people already debunked this about as soon as it happened: it was a dummy account & the Alpha was the only game he had.

Dude Probably reported it himself for the exposure.

Alex Js.
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Kickstarter Donor
Alex Js.

Dude Probably reported it himself for the exposure

Of course he did, and gaining exposure is pretty easy nowadays with all of the “journalists” just copypasting unconfirmed claims from each other ;-)

All these “whole library wiped out” claims remind me of this video:

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Michael18

I guess Anthem was the only game in his library. Can’t imagine EA would remove unrelated games because of that (and can’t imagine this would be legal).

But, as @rafael12104 said below, the more interesting question is: how could they possibly find out so quickly? They must have some automated mechanism there.

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NeoWolf

It would be naieve to assume they do not do checks on people they invite to alpha in order to determine if they stream etc.. and also a rather simple thing to check for such a limited number of people. Then it is a simple matter of following their streaming notifications and social media..something we can safely assume the community team were doing anyway.

Alex Js.
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Kickstarter Donor
Alex Js.

EA, just like every major publisher, are perfectly aware of the Twitch and other streaming platforms such as Mixer or YouTube. They obviously do have people who monitor these sites to see if someone is steaming something that is currently not allowed to stream. And as you can see from the video, the person who was streaming didn’t really care to hide the throwaway Origin account, so it was easy to revoke the access based on that.

Now, the streamers can hide their in-game names or account names, but in this case all EA has to do is to contact Twitch staff who would immediately ban the streamer (but streamer would still have access to the alpha).

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Fervor Bliss

The real problem is the schools not preparing him for the legal world we live in. Be glad he only had his account wiped.

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traja

This is not a punishment for a streamer. The exposure from this is much more valuable than having access to Anthem, which I hear was the only thing on his Origin account.