PUBG Corp drops plagiarism lawsuit against Epic Games as Fortnite’s Playground goes live

    
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It looks like the big legal feud between PUBG and Fortnite is already drawing to a close, as Bloomberg reports PUBG Corp. has withdrawn its lawsuit against Epic Games.

PUBG Corp. lodged its lawsuit in January, claiming that the Fortnite company had plagiarized PUBG’s interface and in-game items, which wasn’t the wildest claim around, as Bluehole had previously pointed out Epic’s potential for conflicts of interest thanks to its stewardship of Unreal Engine, on which both games are built. Plus, Fortnite was originally launched last summer as a co-op, PvE-centric building game but quickly added a battle royale mode in an apparent attempt to catch up to PUBG and had swept past PUBG’s saturation in just a few months, setting records left and right.

Neither PUBG Corp. nor Epic has discussed the case or PUBG Corp.’s reasons for dropping its suit. PUBG Corp.’s lawsuit against Netease apparently soldiers on.

Meanwhile, the Playground mode teased earlier this week in Fortnite is live today, or would be if the servers will stop crapping out from matchmaking problems.

Source: Bloomberg
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Mewmew
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Mewmew

“Neither PUBG Corp. nor Epic has discussed the case or PUBG Corp. reasons for dropping its suit. PUBG Corp.’s lawsuit against Netease apparently soldiers on.”

I truly hope Epic didn’t pay them anything to make it go away. The lawsuit against Epic was about concepts and mechanics, something you specifically can’t copyright or sue over in video games. It would have been nice for everybody to see PUBG lose and clarify this once again to those who thought the suit had some merit for some reason.

Fortnite really plays a lot differently too. The building and destroying made it a completely unique experience from the get go.

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Keida Sotiri

The lawsuit took place in Korea, where BHS had some sort of chance of winning, due to Korea’s history in regards to copyright and the general idea of being able to actually own ideas, in addition to it being their “home” while Epic would be an outsider.

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Sally Bowls

IDK, I was dubious of the lawsuit.

OTOH
I don’t give much credit to the “focus on competing.” Is there anyone involved in game decisions involved in legal decisions? Why would them choosing to sue zero or three companies affect someone working on PUBG?

I doubt it applies here, but sometimes companies file lawsuits that they don’t expect to win. To send a signal to other companies, to get free publicity, to call attention (e.g. investors) to the fact they are in the same game space as FN, etc.

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Armsbend

They were going to be the sole proprietors of Battle Royale for all of time.

You really have to remember – lots of game developers are basically kids – not businessmen. At least not at first.

If I were a talented developer the first thing I’d do is hire a guy like Kotick. The second thing I’d do was to hire a thick skinned CM to take the brunt of all my slings and arrows while I squeezed you guys to death.

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Sally Bowls

IMO, Cringley’s comments in Accidental Empires on the tech industry applies to gaming

1. It happened more or less by accident.
2. The people who made it happen were amateurs.
3. And for the most part they still are.

Mewmew
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Mewmew

“They were going to be the sole proprietors of Battle Royale for all of time.”

That really is basically is what they thought.

They added an air drop and closing arena to a big multiplayer PvP shooter and for some reason thought they did something amazing and unique. I’m not even sure if those two things were totally unique, I bet someone can find some little known games or mods that did those two things already in the past too.

Being sour and pissy about it is one thing, actually filing suits and trying to sue people (over things that specifically can not be copyrighted in video games) is another.

It’s like those kids that threaten to sue over stuff online all the time that has no merit, only they actually went through with filing.

There is and was no suit to be won against Fortnite. I don’t know enough about the Netease games to know if they copied more than concepts and mechanics. I really hope they didn’t. A win there would only confuse what we’ve been trying to get people to understand about video game copyright law. There still would be no case against Fortnite, but suddenly thousands of people paying very little attention would think think there was and that they could have won if they didn’t drop it.

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zuldar

Hmm maybe not the best idea to sue the company that owns the software you’re licensing to run your game.

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Armsbend

Maybe now they can focus on game development instead of letting anger overwhelm them.

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rafael12104

Exactly right. If they want to compete, they need to quit crying and get to it.

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Jeremy Barnes

It was most certainly a “wild” claim.

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Tanek

The idea something like that *could* happen was maybe not so wild (look at the Fallout/Westworld thing), but PUBG’s actual claim? Yeah, pretty wild.

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Jack Pipsam

I suppose they hoped that Epic would back down or something.
Epic doesn’t back down. The only thing PUBG Corp. accomplished was adding to the continuing train-wreck which is their image.

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Tanek

“People laughed at us when we THREATENED to sue Fortnite. In order to repair our image we’ll have to follow through and ACTUALLY sue them!”

a week passes

“That did not go as well as we thought it would.”