EA held a summit about toxicity and healthy video game communities at E3

    
51
Them's fighting words.

In March of last year, a whole truckton of video game companies announced the formation of what they called the Fair Play Alliance, a group intended to “provide an open forum for the games industry to collaborate on research and best practices that encourage fair play and healthy communities in online gaming” in “a world where games are free of harassment, discrimination, and abuse, and where players can express themselves through play.”

We haven’t heard a whole lot out of the group as a whole since, but its individual member companies are pushing forward, and that includes Electronic Arts. This week the company held a Building Healthy Communities Summit at its E3 shindig, stuffed with both experts and influencers discussing toxicity and community. Ultimately, the company says, the summit was a “pressure test” for its three-pronged plan, and it’s working on a developing a “Building Healthy Communities Player Council,” new tools for combating toxicity, and reporting on its progress.

Of course, this isn’t the first video game company making lots of noise about cleaning up the gunk at the bottom of the gaming community’s player well; a quick skim of our toxicity tag shows everyone from Blizzard to Ubisoft claiming to make it a priority in recent years. And as GIbiz implies, talking up toxicity efforts while one of your major sponsored community members was just booted off Twitch for filming people in bathrooms maybe isn’t the best timing, but it’s something.

Source: EA via GIbiz

51
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
MilitiaMasterV
Reader
MilitiaMasterV

One of the amusing/sad/wistful(I’m not even sure what to call it) moments on the E3 conferences was when the guy was on stage talking about the new Wolfenstein games and killing Nazi’s and all I could think to myself was…’We’re about to be doing that again here in America.’

Like humanity didn’t bother to learn that lesson after the second world war…so they wanted to try again to see how many more could die this time around…

Usually I’m all for the gore, and violence in games…but the tail end of one of those conferences was pretty much focused on games that were all about creating as much head-splatter/chain-sawing bodies in half/disregarding the human element of the games…to the point where it was like they were glorifying it, and we wonder why our genre has been shunned so often by people saying we’re the cause of real life violence…

I don’t agree with that thought process, but I can see where they come to that conclusion, because if you start from the position of de-humanizing something, you’re often not thinking about the fact that there’s someone else on the other end…

Whether it be from playing a shooter game where you’re ‘winning’ in your mind, but that’s meaning someone else is ‘losing’…but a philosophical point can be made that you’ve really just ‘lost’ something of yourself there, instead of ‘winning’ anything.

…or that people who play these shooters all the time are going around ‘killing’ people…and don’t stop to truly think about, or realize that the ‘end’ of that behavior is always someone’s death. We don’t get re-spawns in real life.

Our games are played by young kids, who haven’t always necessarily formed the where-with-all to differentiate what they see on a screen in front of them, from reality, and more and more of the younger generations don’t seem to be being taught the value of a human life, whoever/whatever that life is.

I think a lot of the toxicity we see in games nowadays is because of prelearned notions towards some subset/stereotype/class/group/status, along with a lot of the ‘I just like to cause a ruckus’ types of trolls.

People need to realize that except for NPC’s (At least until advancements in AI), every single person you come across in games is a living breathing person somewhere on this planet, with thoughts/feelings, who should be treated with the same respect you’d want someone to treat you with.

You really should just be treating even NPC’s decently from the start, or it really does say something about you as a person. And not good things. I’ll grant that it’s fun to blow off some steam ‘taking it out’ on another person/NPC at times, but even so, you should attempt to be the best person you can be, even online. (No, I don’t support Trump’s wife’s ‘Be Best’, except as a general way of treating people.)

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
NeoWolf

Genius, lets get all the trolls together in one room and… lol

Reader
Jon Wax

And what? Please elaborate?

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
NeoWolf

Teach them how to be better trolls obviously lol

Reader
draugris

Well if i could only believe that EA´s concern is the well being of their customers. In reality, it´s more likely that they will use this to shut down criticism and implement censorship.

Reader
rosieposie

Yeah, I’d be alright with that, but these mega-corps most certainly think that toxicity also includes loudly and vocally complaining about where the twipple-ay industry is heading.

Reader
Randy Savage

What’s next? Are cats going to hold a summit on the ethical treatment of mice?

Reader
Denice J. Cook

Toxic players are a terrible thing. However, in EA’s case, what they really should be focusing on is all the things they do that piss people off in the first place. ;)

PurpleCopper
Reader
PurpleCopper

oh the irony of EA holding a summit about toxicity…

Reader
Nathan Aldana

yet EA also hasnt addressed gambleboxes or crunch at all

Reader
Anton Mochalin

That the most boring of all game dev companies is holding a “summit on toxicity” shows how unnatural this whole topic is. We play games where we kill all sorts of living creatures by thousands, turn to the side of evil, lie and betray but somehow saying some particular words or being angry at one’s teammates is “toxic” and should be “fought”.

Reader
Axetwin .

In a word, yes. Everything you mentioned about how we play games isn’t real. It’s fake, it’s fantasy, it doesn’t matter. The things we say to each other, even through online text, matter. It’s real, it has actual impact. Killing an army of fictional people is not the same as dropping racial slurs in voice chat.

Reader
Mr.McSleaz

“The things we say to each other, even through online text, matter.”

Only if you allow Words to hold power over you.

Reader
Bruno Brito

Words HAVE power over you. And other people. Just because you don’t care, doesn’t mean other people won’t or shouldn’t.

This victim-blaming mentality is pathetic and tiresome. If you got time to give advice, why not shutdown the trolls when you perceive one?

Reader
Mr.McSleaz

“This victim-blaming mentality is pathetic and tiresome. ”

This Turning everyone who disagrees with certain words into “Victims” is pathetic and tiresome.

Reader
Bruno Brito

We’re not talking about discussions, Mr. Sleazy. We’re talking about TOXICITY.

There’s a huge difference. Your apologetics are not lost on me.

Reader
Jon Wax

How bout let’s talk about both sides. If you want to rage on toxic players, equal hate must flow towards the corrosive players. Two sides to every issue. You guys don’t hold high ground here.

Reader
Jon Wax

Good Lord…so much wrong in such a small space. If words hurt you shouldn’t really be on the web. Lotta words on here. Couple bad ones…

Reader
3dom

From what I’ve seen toxicity is less detrimental to the gameplay than companies’ anti-toxicity measures – such as not implementing in-game chats / voice comms at all (Anthem, Ring of Elysium) and/or kicking people out of chats non-stop for memes and mentioning other games (Warframe).