The US government is now probing Epic and Riot in relation to Tencent’s data security

    
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The US government is now probing Epic and Riot in relation to Tencent’s data security

Remember back in August when the Trump administration made noise about trying to ban WeChat and Tencent from transactions with folks in the US? It caused a big ripple at the time, as it was written to effectively include all of Tencent’s holdings, including its games studios, everything from Riot and Epic to Funcom and Grinding Gear. While officials told press the executive order would not affect Tencent’s game studio holdings, we were all pretty skeptical oh how that would play out.

That skepticism was apparently warranted, as last night Bloomberg reported on sources from Fortnite developer Epic Games and League of Legends developer Riot Games who have admitted that the Trump administration has “inquire[d] about their security protocols in handling Americans’ personal data” in relation to Tencent. Neither the government nor companies responded to Bloomberg’s request for comment on the record, but headlines this morning are already moving on to the impending ban of WeChat and TikTok this weekend.

Source: Bloomberg via GIbiz and Polygon

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zaber

Epic games did get caught stealing your Steam data. Then act like was a code they forgot to turn off, ones they got caught. I won’t be surprise Epic giving data to by 40% Tencent, most company give data to there parter.

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Bannex

We need an internet bill of rights, not only to protect us from foreign interest but also domestic ones.

The US govt isn’t innocent in widespread data gathering either. There needs to be a shift that makes the individuals internet data a personal property that nobody has the right to unless they knowingly allow it.

The amount of people defending the Chinese here is crazy. Enjoy your social credit system! (And that’s the least tyrannical thing the Chinese govt does.)

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Bruno Brito

The amount of people defending the Chinese here is crazy. Enjoy your social credit system! (And that’s the least tyrannical thing the Chinese govt does.)

You talk like we live there.

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Bannex

No, I’m pointing out the massive human rights infringements they routinely do with their data collection.

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Bruno Brito

Not disagreeing, i just don’t think we are any better. It’s not whataboutism to identify our own shortcomings.

Also, i have a genuine question: What is our data used for?

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Bannex

I have that same question. Im not absolving the US government at all in this case. Hell we could have a social credit system that’s hidden from the general public. The Chinese government doesn’t have to hide shit because their citizens can’t do a damn thing about it unless they want to get run over by tanks.

Sad reality is we’re participating in our own incarceration. Even sadder is the fact that the American worker is essentially worthless from an economic perspective. 4 trillion dollars and none of them went to increasing my income and I work on the front lines of the pandemic. But don’t worry we saved the billionaires!!!

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Ernost

I find the hypocrisy of this whole situation quite amusing. People who have no problem handing over their data to American corporations now suddenly have a problem handing it to Chines corporations.

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Bannex

I don’t think their is any hypocrisy here. This article is about protecting the American people from foreign interests. If there was an article about the patriot act im sure we’d all be just as pissed at the American govt. What aboutism is a stupid way to strawman.

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Rndomuser

I find it more amusing that people genuinely believe that the current US government really cares about foreign governments potentially having access to personal information of US citizens and access to all files on PCs and smartphones of US citizens. Totally disregarding the fact (and yes, this is a fact) that if US government really cared about protecting data of US citizens, companies like Kaspersky Lab or My.com would not be allowed to sell their software or do any kind of business with US citizens. The naivety of some people is both sad and amusing.

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Armsbend

Have a burning fury that spurs one into action.
Find a fundamental weakness in the system.
Put a plan into motion.
Fulfill a singular destiny.
Be relentless – NEVER stop until it all lays upon your feet as conquered.

To see the fruition of action is something many will never see – it is so absolutely worth it when it does. Find that thing your are passionate about and destroy it – Shiva’s greatest of all gifts.

Never, ever stop until all of your goals are met.

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Schlag Sweetleaf

dont know what you’re saying, but i like how you’re saying it:) didnt want you to pass by here unheralded. /salute

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Schlag Sweetleaf

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Utakata

…lol, he looks so much like Winnie-the-Pooh, doesn’t he? o.O

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PanagiotisLial1

I guess it will have the same result as the GDPR had for us in EU:

Make players coming from these areas less desirable or booting them out fully (remember players were banned from warpportal that has games like Ragnarok due to GDRP ruleset and some were quite invested for many years). I suspect similarly a number of game providers will just ban US players or just raise prices on them(which happened too for us, EU players on those that kept the service for us, aka most)

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Bruno Brito

(remember players were banned from warpportal that has games like Ragnarok due to GDRP ruleset and some were quite invested for many years).

Honestly. They made them a favor. Warpportal is a garbage company and retail Ragnarok was godawful. It boomed OriginsRO server pop and they deserved it, great server.

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PanagiotisLial1

It doesnt change the fact that many had 5+ years account with a lot of cash shop purchases and just got that type of ban all of a sudden without being their fault

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Bruno Brito

It doesn’t.

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Bryan Turner

As I said regarding the upcoming ban this Sunday, use a VPN and make it look like you live in Canada tada!!!

Problems have solutions, you’ll still get to play what ever the hell you want.

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Leiloni

You would rather put your personal data at risk of potentially being used by the Chinese government just to play a game? Hopefully they are handling everyone’s data properly and it’s a non-issue, but it’s most certainly something to be concerned about. Tencent is not your friend.

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Bryan Turner

I don’t play any games that Tencent has an interest in other than Blizzard games, pretty sure our data has been sold for years to any one with money, have GMail odds are your data is for sale, have Facebook your data is for sale, watch Youtube google sold your watching habits, hell your streaming services probably sell what your watching as well, own a smart speaker that data is being sold, the government knows what porn you look at, nothing’s sacred regarding data and we were sold up that river at least a decade ago.

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Leiloni

There’s a major difference here that makes it a bigger security issue. The Chinese government has essentially espionage laws that force all Chinese companies to comply with them when asked as “agents of the government”. So Tencent would have to allow the Chinese government access to all of your personal data – full name, address, payment information, whatever data they have on your habits or computer information. When Chinese companies purchase American companies, the Chinese government could otherwise have free and unlimited access to tons of valuable data on American people and companies. I’m glad to see our government finally has started to care.

When Facebook is selling your data, they already allow you to limit what data you provide and if or how any of it is used. And when it’s used it’s mostly harmless stuff like demographics only used by advertisers to sell you stuff. It’s annoying, but not a major threat.

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Bryan Turner

Like I said I don’t play any of the games in the cross hairs so I guess I’m safe from the Chinese, even though they probably bought the information from Russian Hackers any way thanks to all the data breaches various companies have had over the past few years.

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Rndomuser

So Tencent would have to allow the Chinese government access to all of your personal data – full name, address, payment information, whatever data they have on your habits or computer information.

Oh no, Chinese government will know my address, my credit card and contents of my folders on D:/ drive, including a folder with thousands of Astolfo pictures! Whatever shall I do?

Seriously, though, if you are concerned about Chinese government finding out your address or name – you are free to not use mobile apps which belong to Chinese corporations. And you are free to not buy or play games that are sold by company with a major Chinese investor. This is your choice and you are always free to do that. But! And it’s a very big “but” – I should also have a CHOICE of downloading and using those apps regardless of what they do, same goes for games from Epic Store which I buy and use, and no government should tell me whether am I allowed doing this or not. If you personally like this kind of government which would tell you what you as a citizen are allowed to download on your own phone or your own PC – you are welcome to move to a country where such government already exist. Such as China ;-)

I’m glad to see our government finally has started to care.

Only thing current US government cares about is to decrease business opportunities for Chinese corporations by any means, even if it means restricting the choice of own citizens. They don’t actually care if your information will end up in hands of some foreign dictatorship, just like they don’t care if you, for example, will buy Kaspersky Internet Security from Amazon, which can search for specific files on your PC and submit “interesting” files as “potential malware” to Kaspersky’s own servers. If US government cared about your data not ending up in hands of foreign government – Kaspersky products would not be available for sale in US.

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Bruno Brito

including a folder with thousands of Astolfo pictures!

Share those please.

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PanagiotisLial1

Facebook, I remember there was a case about it selling data during the financial crisis but suddently the case “disappeared”

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Bruno Brito

You’re not wrong, but ocidental companies are as much dangerous as the CPP is.

I find that Equifax databreaches are way more concerning to the security of the US citizenry than whatever much cash Bob dropped on League of Legends for the Pulsefire Ezreal skin.

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Tuor of Gondolin

Lie down with the dogs and you get up with fleas.

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Rndomuser

Man, the sinophobia is strong with current administration. They keep wasting money on all those probes and writing all those laws. Meanwhile I still use TikTok and WeChat on my smartphone (there are no good alternatives to TikTok simply because other app developers are too lazy to make one and WeChat is basically the only app you can use to communicate with some people in a different country) and I don’t really care what those apps do as long as they do not significantly affect the battery life, I just don’t store any valuable information on my smartphone which has these apps. And Chinese government cannot do anything to me regardless of what information they might find because I don’t plan on visiting this country. And I will continue using those apps even if the current dictatorship regime in US will remove those from app stores – I can still download .apk file from any website and install those apps this way on my phone. Same goes for Epic Games.

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treehuggerhannah

I don’t question that there is probably a legit security issue involved on some level, but this approach is not going to solve it.

There is no coherent policy or coordinated method of inquiry evident here. The right hand doesn’t even seem to know what the left hand is doing regarding looking into the situation.

If there is a real problem to be solved, it needs to be treated like one and addressed in a comprehensive and planned manner that looks at a broad range of companies and their holdings, not just whatever the administration feels like doing today that’s totally the opposite of what they asserted about it last month.

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Utakata

I think Tik Tok and Tencent should be held in account too. But like with many things this administration has done, this is likely not the best way to deal with it…to put it mildly.

Instead, there should be a bipartisan approach that states that if these entities want to do business within the US jurisdiction, there’s certain rules and regulations they’ll need to be following. Severing their back channel ties to Beijing should be one of them.

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Brazen Bondar

Exactly right. Some coherent policy with “coherent” being the operative word. I’m no apologist for big business but, all businesses need clear, consistent, policy from the regulating authority. Congress is the authority that should be making these decisions, not a huckster conman whose main goal is to enrich his friends and relatives.

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silverlock

But competent regulatory authorities are the bane of conman hucksters! How will they ever afford their yachts, mansions, planes, and hush money payments!

Also deep state oh scary!!!