plex

PLEX, short for pilot license extension, is EVE Online’s virtual currency.

EVE Online is adding smaller skill injectors for newer players

The changes to PLEX for EVE Online make it easier to buy small chunks, sell small chunks, and not have all of it get blown up when you stuff a cargo hold full of your money. Of course, part of what has made PLEX so vital is the need for newer players to be able to catch up with veterans, which ties into use of skill injectors… which are currently very expensive. So the game is introducing a cheaper way to get those, as well.

Existing skill injectors will be marked as large injectors, while the new smaller skill injectors will hold a maximum of 100,000 points and offer smaller and smaller rewards to players with more skill points. The hope is that newer players can buy the bite-sized injector and start to catch up before moving on to larger purchases, thus ensuring that everyone can more quickly take part in the sprawling wars of backstabbing that make the game tick along.

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The MOP Up: Neverwinter’s green beetle fiasco (May 21, 2017)

The MMO industry moves along at the speed of information, and sometimes we’re deluged with so much news here at Massively Overpowered that some of it gets backlogged. That’s why there’s The MOP Up: a weekly compilation of smaller MMO stories and videos that you won’t want to miss. Seen any good MMO news? Hit us up through our tips line!

This week we have stories and videos from TERARendTree of SaviorDragon NestNeverwinterArmored WarfareEVE OnlineOverwatchARKWakfuDestiny, and Pokemon Go, all waiting for you after the break!

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EVE Online’s patch today changes PLEX and adds new Blood Raider ships and shipyards

The bad news for EVE Online fans is that the game is going to require extended downtime today. There’s nothing to be done about it; it’s just a thing that has to happen. Why? Because the big 119.5 patch is going live. That means the game is rolling out PLEX changes to make PLEX into a currency while also no longer making PLEX a valuable physical item to blow up on a regular basis.

Of course, this patch contains more besides, as there’s the first iteration of new AI systems with Blood Raider shipyards and visual improvements to suns throughout the game. Players will also be able to display fleet emblems on station, enjoy new models for the Pacifier and Enforcer, and obtain new Blood Raider capital ships. You can check out the full patch notes to find out what you’ll be doing once the servers come back up; you’ll have plenty of time to think about it.

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EVE Online rolls out major PLEX changes on May 9

When EVE Online releases its next big patch on May 9th, PLEX is changing in a big way. For example, the old days of ships carrying around a huge number of PLEX packages and getting blown up will be a thing of the past; PLEX will now be stored in a central vault that can be accessed from anywhere, meaning that it’s no longer incredibly valuable (and volatile) cargo. It’s also being converted into currency in its own right, broken into 500 PLEX rather than a single PLEX item used to extend subscription time.

This makes the name “pilot license extension” rather inappropriate, but since everyone just calls it PLEX all of the time anyhow, the actual impact will be lessened.

All of the changes will also mean that PLEX will be the new go-to microtransaction currency while being less vulnerable to destruction in the game. A month of subscription will cost 500 PLEX, so that elemet of gameplay remains fundamentally the same, even though it’s possible to earn PLEX in smaller increments over time with the shift. So if you’ve got some vulnerable haulers full of PLEX… maybe just leave those in the dock until May 9th. Then you can have them haul something less expensive.

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EVE Online addresses PLEX overhaul Aurum conversion but not insider trading

Last week, we covered CCP’s new plan to change EVE Online’s 30-day sub currency, PLEX, by effectively breaking it into smaller chunks and turning it into more of a cash shop currency that’s more easily fungible and tradeable.

It was an announcement not without its detractors, as Massively OP’s EVE columnist Brendan Drain explained over the weekend: Some players were miffed that PLEX will be transportable without the risk of ship-to-ship movement, while others grumbled about the short-term effect on the market and poor conversion rates for the secondary currency, Aurum, and the lack of conversion for players with fewer than 1000 Aurum. And as is common with such in-game economies, still others are up in arms over apparent market corruption, as it appears that players with insider information began trading ahead of the announcement to manipulate the economy — as Brendan suggests, likely a CSM (player council) member privy to information ahead of the embargo lift.

Today, CCP posted an update meant to assuage some of the concerns about the new program.

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EVE Evolved: What’s the deal with EVE’s PLEX changes?

This week CCP Games announced that some big changes are on the way for PLEX in EVE Online. The PLEX or “30-day Pilot’s License EXtension” is a virtual item that represents 30 days of subscription time and can be bought for cash and then sold to other players for in-game ISK. This simple mechanic has proven to be one of the most important innovations in the subscription MMO business model over the years, allowing players with lots of in-game wealth to effectively play for free while permitting cash-rich players to buy in-game currency without funding dodgy farming operations that can disrupt the game world. Dozens of games now support some kind of player-mediated currency roughly like PLEX.

The proposed changes are intended to simplify EVE‘s business model by merging PLEX with the microtransaction currency Aurum. Players will also be able to put their PLEX into invulnerable account-wide PLEX Vaults that are accessible at all times rather than having to move the valuable items manually by ship. There’s been significant backlash from the EVE community over the newfound invulnerability of PLEX, plans to delete some microtransaction currency from the game without compensation, and the possibility that someone leaked the announcement to friends early in order to make a profit. So what’s the deal with these PLEX changes, and why are some EVE players going nuts over them?

In this edition of EVE Evolved, I look at the upcoming changes to the safety of PLEX, the opportunities that more granular PLEX could have for EVE, and why players are up in arms over plans to delete Aurum from thousands of accounts.

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EVE Online overhauls PLEX currency system, ending tales of PLEX-stuffed ship destruction

CCP announced this morning that it’s overhauling PLEX in EVE Online. As the currency works now, players buy the 30-day sub token known as PLEX with cash and then either use it or sell it to other players in exchange for in-game currency, isk.

“We really like PLEX because it lets you players in the in-game market decide what trade-offs you want to make between time, isk, and real money,” CCP Seagull explains in a new video today. “It also gives us at CCP a type of income that doesn’t mess with the integrity of the game design.” The overhaul won’t impact that philosophy, but here’s what is changing:

PLEX will be broken down into smaller chunks; one current PLEX, worth around $15 or 30 days of sub time, will now work out to 500 new PLEX, which is intended to allow players more flexibility in trade and allow CCP to effectively sell smaller sub lengths (although it has not announced its intention to do this) as well as smaller items in the cash shop using PLEX as currency.

Possibly of more interest to non-EVE players is the fact that the new PLEX Vault in the player inventory will allow players to move PLEX without actually putting it in their ships. No more wacky stories about people losing thousands of dollars’ worth of PLEX while dragging them in ships across the galaxy!

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EVE Online players lead $14,000 massacre in a busy trade hub

It’s said that you’re never truly safe in EVE Online unless you’re docked or logged off, and sometimes not even then. If someone wants you dead badly enough, he can get to you even in the heart of high-security space surrounded by legions of CONCORD police ships. The police in EVE will get revenge on anyone who attacks another player in high-security space, but they aren’t very big on crime prevention and take a few seconds to kick in. If you can get enough players together in high-damage ships, you have enough time to take out some pretty big prey before CONCORD comes to promptly turn your attack fleet into floating scrap.

That’s the premise behind suicide ganking, and it wouldn’t be EVE if someone didn’t turn this most heinous of crimes into a huge player-run event or even an annual tradition. Starting in 2012, the Burn Jita event sees hundreds of players in the Goonswarm Federation alliance flock to EVE‘s main trade hub system of Jita for a weekend to suicide gank as many industrial ships, freighters, and random passers-by as possible. Burn Jita 4 took place recently, and killboard records estimate the final damage total to be over 750 billion ISK (worth roughly $10,000 to $14,000 via PLEX conversion at current rates). According to the latest economic report, this impressive figure is actually only around 2% of the total ship value destroyed game-wide throughout February.

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EVE Evolved: 2016 EVE Online year in review

It’s been another busy year for sci-fi MMO EVE Online, and an absolute roller coaster ride for both players and developer CCP Games. On the development side, we’ve had two major expansions with Citadel and Ascension and a significant business model change with the introduction of a free-to-play account option. Fan events EVE Fanfest 2016 and EVE Vegas 2016 brought us some fantastic insights into the future development, including a peek at some amazing work on future PvE gameplay and an all-new EVE FPS codenamed Project Nova.

Proving once again that the players in EVE are the most engaging content, this year brought us the political twists and turns of the now-infamous World War Bee, which became the largest PvP war ever to happen in an online game. We also delved into some absolutely crazy sandbox stories, including one player using $28,000 worth of skill injectors to create a max skill character as a publicity stunt, and the controversial banning of the gambling kingpins behind World War Bee.

In this edition of EVE Evolved, I look back over all the biggest EVE stories of the year, from the political shenanigans of World War Bee to the surprise free-to-play option and how expansions have changed the face of the game this year.

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Massively OP’s Best of 2016 Awards: Best MMORPG Business Model of 2016

Massively Overpowered’s end-of-the-year 2016 awards continue today with our award for Best MMORPG Business Model of 2016, which is a new award we’re doling out for the first time this year thanks to a proposal from reader strangesands. This award is intended to recognize a live MMORPG of any age that has demonstrated an exemplary business model specifically in 2016, regardless of its past performance. Don’t forget to cast your own vote in the just-for-fun reader poll at the very end!

The Massively OP staff pick for Best MMORPG Business Model of 2016 is…

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EVE Evolved: The Siege of M-0EE8, the new largest battle in gaming history

In the political sandbox of EVE Online, colossal player-run military coalitions frequently war over territorial conflicts, in revenge for past transgressions or just for fun. Circle of Two alliance recently found itself the target of a massive war not long after it had built a colossal 300 billion ISK Keepstar citadel in the historically contested nullsec system of M-0EE8. Opposing alliances set up their own smaller citadels next to the Keepstar and used them as staging points in an all-out attack on the system. Following two intense battles over the Keepstar in which hundreds of billions of ISK was lost, the explosive final phase of the conflict took place last night in what has come to be known as The Siege of M-0EE8.

I arrived in M-0EE8 in a cloaked covert ops frigate at around 18:30 EVE time to watch the event unfold, and it wasn’t long before a world-record-breaking 5,300 pilots had poured into the star system. A cluster of anchorable warp disruption field generators hung like bright lanterns in space, with great swarms of Scorpions and shoals of Machariels swirling inside. A constant stream of weapons fire flowed from these blinding death bubbles to the Keepstar, whittling down its immense structure like a swarm of insects nipping at a Tyrannosauros Rex.

In this edition of EVE Evolved, I give a brief account of the Siege of M-0EE8, share some screenshots from the event, take a look at how the server coped with the enormous battle, and drill down into the battle stats to see just how record-breaking the siege was.

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How MMO economies have gotten smarter about fighting hyperinflation

If you’re anything like me, you don’t spend a great deal of time thinking about the large picture of MMO economies. It’s mostly just a selfish “how much money can I make?” and “what can I spend it on?” It’s probably a very good thing that there are devs who have put a good deal of thought and design into economies to keep these games enjoyable.

In a recent Extra Credits video, the crew discusses how MMORPGs used to suffer from hyperinflation due to players being infinite money-printing machines. You might have seen the solution to this but not quite understood what it was or how it works to keep that inflation down. The concept is called “reserve currency” and it has to do with those tokens, diamonds, and gems that are paid for with real-world money and can be traded for in-game gold.

It’s a fascinating watch that will make you appreciate all of the effort and complexities that go into MMO economies. Check it out below!

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RuneScape offers new subscription packages with ‘Premier Club’

The folks at Guinness World Records may have once counted RuneScape as the world’s most popular free MMORPG, but it’s had an optional subscription, albeit a relatively small one, for a very long time. What it hasn’t had consistently is an array of subscription packages with discounts and bonuses, and that’s what it’s getting today with what Jagex is calling “Premier Club.”

“Featuring subscription discounts and exclusive bonuses that support players of both the modern game and its hardcore 2007 version, Old School RuneScape, Premier Club readies the community both new and old for a busy and exciting year ahead, including three new expansions, and the introduction of a dynamic weather system. Available for purchase now through Feb. 5, 2017, the three tiers – Bronze, Silver, and Gold – will also feature limited edition content. Those buying the Gold tier will receive an exclusive in-game outfit, 30 percent membership discounts to both RuneScape and Old School RuneScape, entry into next season’s Deadman Tournaments, bonus amounts of loyalty points, and more.”

The packages range from $24.99 to $79.49, including three to 12 months of membership and comparable loyalty points and other perks. Do note that players can also buy packages with RuneScape bonds, which are akin to WoW Tokens or EVE Plex.

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