Chronicles of Elyria embraces ‘earn-to-play’ model

    
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Chronicles of Elyria understands that not everyone can game around the clock, and through a couple of systems the team is striving to make sure “people with different amounts of free time are still able to play together in an equitable and rewarding way.”

The first way that the upcoming MMO will do this is through a stat bolstering system. When grouped up with a “family member” who is more advanced, the game will boost the lesser character’s stats to a similar level. Skill selection for the bolstered character will remain the same.

The second method is paying players in “story points” for participating in the game. Story points can be used to purchase sparks of life and other in-game advantages. These sparks of life are essentially tokens for a new character that will live a mortal and finite life in the game. Thus, sparks can be both earned through gameplay and purchased with real-world cash.

“In Chronicles of Elyria, the story points you earn while playing can be traded in between lifetimes in order to buy sparks of life,” the devs explained. “This is what we call the ‘earn-to-play’ model of funding. Now, we’re not the first to do this. There’s been a couple other games that have done something similar. But, as far as we know we’re the first to use a currency that rewards people for participating in the story, and as far as we know we’re the first do this that doesn’t use a subscription model.”

The game is launching a Kickstarter campaign on May 3rd.

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IndigoSalma
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IndigoSalma

Francis courant everything.

mysecretid
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mysecretid

PaganRites 
Aye. One of the things which failed a recent Kickstarter I backed wasn’t that there weren’t a solid number of people who truly wanted to see the game get made, but that the amount of money the developers genuinely felt they needed to make the game properly was simply beyond what could reasonably be expected — especially with Kickstarter’s one-month limit.

I knew as soon as they posted their target amount, “This is not gonna go — that’s too much money to expect from this many fans, even under perfect circumstances”.

It makes me wonder if good games are getting legitimately too expensive to crowdfund under the standard Kickstarter model? I don’t know.

I wish Chronicles of Elyria better luck; I’ll take a look at their Kickstarter, since you mentioned it, and see how they’re faring.

Cheers,

PaganRites
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PaganRites

I’ve been reading everything I can about CoE. I’m backing it. I love what the devs are trying to accomplish. Everything they have released so far is impressive. I do hope they have an ace up their sleeve to make sure this Kickstarter is successful.

mysecretid
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mysecretid

PaganRites 
As an aside, Pagan, I’m interested in characters who can age in Chronicles of Elyria  — at least in part — because permadeath seems not to be some sort of “punishment” for failing an in-game objective here, as it is in most permadeath game scenarios I’ve seen.
As you suggest, most death penalties in games are stale, at best, and at worst (permadeath) they’re Nelson Muntz from The Simpsons shouting, “Ha! Ha!” at your corpse after you’ve already failed. :-)
 I’ve always said that failing is its own punishment; we don’t generally need a game stomping on us while we’re down to “remind” us that we’ve failed.

So, yeah, I agree that the old models are stale, and with the naturally-aging characters in Chronicles of Elyria, I could see an interesting sort of “multi-generational saga” sort of gameplay emerging — where you’re not simply playing your character, but all the characters of your in-game legacy, over time.

The generational effect makes for interesting developments in games such as The Sims, or Crusader Kings II, and players do get pretty attached to their “dynasties”. It would be interesting to see how that sort of “generational gameplay” might play out in an online game.

Cheers,

PaganRites
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PaganRites

Astald Other than permadeath, I don’t see much in common actually.  And the way the two games were/are approaching permadeath is totally different.

 The biggest draw to Revival was live storytelling and dev run dynamic events.  There’s nothing like that here.  CoE has an aging mechanic to set it apart.. The only thing they really have in common is both are trying to break from the stale mold that most every MMORPG suffers from.

karmamule
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karmamule

Armsbend At least they don’t call their players ‘luminaries’….

Francis courant
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Francis courant

IndigoSalma What do you believe is wrong with this pricing model?

Craywulf
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Craywulf

h4 You say pandering, I’ll say marketing 101. They are not trying pull one over with you, and they are very much entitled to create a marketing catchphrase.

Francis courant
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Francis courant

h4 It seems pretty different than how it works in EVE Online with the PLEX system. In EVE afaik players can trade monthly sub tokens in-game for items or resources (players to players) while in CoE if I understood correctly they’re putting a system in place that rewards players directly for their participation, and this reward can be exchanged for sparks of life.

deekay_zero
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deekay_zero

h4 deekay_zero Armsbend like a sub guild. in wildstar it’d be akin to “circles” for example.