Chris Roberts says Star Citizen is ‘not a pipe dream’ in spite of taking longer than planned

    
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Chris Roberts says Star Citizen is ‘not a pipe dream’ in spite of taking longer than planned

It’s been some time since we’ve heard a peep from Star Citizen’s Chris Roberts — the 10 for the Chairman video series has ended, and we haven’t had a roundtable Pillar Talk since April, though that’s likely more due to the pandemic than anything else. However, CIG’s big boss has recently emerged in a couple of forum replies to a thread about the game’s planned room atmosphere system.

In the first, Roberts explains that the system that determines room atmosphere has been in the game for quite some time, accounting for players suffocating in vaccuum, the game’s atmospheric flight model, and weather among other things. Furthermore, atmospheres are either mutable (able to shift from one state to another, as in opening a sealed spaceship to the vaccuum and suddenly having no atmosphere) and immutable (space has not atmosphere everywhere, planets do). The team is working on ways to refine that further for ships, but that will take some effort as they need to introduce some literal plumbing components.

The second post, however, is where things get zesty: Roberts responded to a reply from the OP in that same thread where he railed against issues with how people offer their complaints about Star Citizen’s dev cycle.

“My biggest disappointment with modern internet discourse is that there’s a significant amount of cynicism, especially in forum or Reddit debates, and a portion of people assume the worst. If a feature is missing, late or buggy it’s because the company or the developer lied and or / is incompetent as opposed to the fact that it just took longer and had more problems than the team thought it would when they originally set out to build it. Developers by their very nature are optimistic. You have to be to build things that haven’t ever been built before. Otherwise the sheer weight of what is needed to be done can crush you. But being optimistic or not foreseeing issues isn’t the same as lying or deliberately misleading people. Everyone at CIG is incredibly passionate about making Star Citizen the most immersive massively multiplayer first person universe sandbox, and everyone works very hard to deliver that. If we could deliver harder, faster, better we would. We get just as frustrated with the time things take.

“I sense from your reply to me that it’s the time taken and priorities that you’re frustrated with, as you feel like we’re focusing on the wrong things. I can see that point of view, but you’re looking at it from the outside without the full knowledge of exactly what it will take, and the order it needs to be done in to deliver the gameplay that will set Star Citizen above everything else. This is the game I’ve dreamed of my whole life. Now I am in a position to realize it, I am not willing to compromise it’s potential because it is taking longer than I originally envisioned.

“I can promise you the gameplay I described is not a pipe dream, nor will it take 10 to 20 years to deliver.”

source: offocial forums (1, 2), thanks to Zippy for the tip(py)!

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Ernost
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Ernost

My biggest disappointment with modern internet discourse is that there’s a significant amount of cynicism, especially in forum or Reddit debates, and a portion of people assume the worst.

Ironically enough, that is exactly what a scammer or conman would say.

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Schlag Sweetleaf

No mega-epic SC thread would be complete without the apologetics of the Apostle Joe,

Well done, thou good and faithful servant….

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Armsman

As a huge Fantastic Four fan, I love the above. ;)

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Schlag Sweetleaf

Galachris is a bit cringe, but shillver surfer, ..that’s the ticket:)

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Joe Blobers

Here is my up-vote… for free :)

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Bryan Turner

Well played, easily earns a spot on your greatest hits album I think since it works on many levels.

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Rob Hagaman

Really, why waste money on this game, when you have two great options in Elite Dangerous and EVE Online, that are solid and work right now, and which you could play, both, for the money you would waste supporting this brick. Especially is you want to “pilot” a ship and do surface exploration, ED is a great option. EVE gives interaction with other players in a sandbox unequaled in the genre. Both prove you don’t need bleeding edge graphics or endlessly reskinned expensive ships to have fun. Players make the game. The game doesn’t make the players.

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Joe Blobers

Really why pretending ED and EVE do offer what SC do provide in current Alpha while their released and patch version after years is providing experience which is totally different.
Those games, and you can include NMS, are not competitors and it is a waste of time to pretend they are.

ED players stats since Sep. 2019:
– per day peak players: 7K
– maximum peak players: 22K

EVE players stats since Sep. 2019:
– per day peak players: 6K
– maximum peak players: 9K

SC Alpha individual players:
– per day peak players: 30K
– maximum peak players: 100K (during free events)

Quote: “Both prove you don’t need bleeding edge graphics or endlessly reskinned expensive ships to have fun. Players make the game. The game doesn’t make the players.
Both prove you don’t need providing false reality to enjoy each individual game for what they are, even in Alpha, and that SC ships are everything but reskinned ships. Anyone just a bit honest would recognize there is a substantial difference between an Aurora and an Idris, Constellation or Reclaimer…

The players make the game… assuming they can compare. Have another look to stats: best players vote :)

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Nosy Gamer

I don’t know where you got the stats for EVE Online, but they are way off according to the player-run EVE-Offine.net website. While EVE hasn’t come close to its record of 65,303 concurrent players set back in 2013 for years, it did hit 41,562 concurrent players on the Tranquility server (all the world except China) back on May 10, 2020. Over the past month, Tranquility has averaged 25K players online.

Just looking at the statistics over the last 24 hours, the peak number of users on Tranquility was 33,917 and on the Serenity server (China) it was 17,721. The average number of players logged in during the period is 22K on Tranquility and 8500 on Serenity.

I don’t have the average concurrent users for Sunday, EVE’s busiest day of the week, but the peak concurrent user number for Sunday were 35,801 on Tranquility and 18,112 on Serenity. Both numbers far exceed the numbers you list as the peak for EVE. And we are currently in the slowest part of the year for EVE.

Now, I would celebrate that, at least according to you, EVE Online is more popular than Star Citizen. But as we know, Star Citizen pulls in more money than EVE. Plus, I can’t trust your statistics.

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Joe Blobers

All data from Steam charts not mine.
I am not the one shooting at others games space just because I don’t play them. Good to know numbers are higher based on EVE online data.

Still SC is doing pretty well being an Alpha with bugs, crash and not all gameplay loop.
long life to ED, NMS, EVE… and SC :)

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ichi sakari

both Eve and ED have issues, just like SC has issues

I don’t know if you have ever loaded up SC and found some people to play with but currently the ‘players make the game’ is a pretty good description of SC

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KGBphotos

Looks like that cynicism is alive and well in these comments.

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PanagiotisLial1

MMOs are normally developed and expanded through all their lifetime. The important is to deliver something fun and playable at first and go from there expanding. This project seems like its development is handled more like a single player game where they try to include everything they ever dreamt of on day 1 as if releasing a finalised game.

The better approach would had been to go design the basic gameplay and visuals along with a big enough world and make sure its fun enough and expand with expansions and patches like all mmos do. The longer they delay by adding more features before releasing the more they run into the danger of simply running out of funds – especially if their backers say “enough” and close their wallets on future ship sales

John Artemus
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John Artemus

This is why you need a publisher pushing you with deadlines and telling you what you can and cannot do. I know a lot of people hate big publishers because they are so corporate, and yes, they deserve a lot of the hate they get, but they also deliver games in a timely manner.

Now, whether those games are good or not is a completely different discussion. But whenever you leave stuff up to just the creators, or in this case the developers, it takes forever. For various reasons.

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Jim Bergevin Jr

I guess he means another 10 to 20 years, because the first decade is already up and all they have to show for it is a tech demo with one paltry system.

The AAA studios have their own issues, but at least they are able to produce full and satisfying games in less time, despite what Blobs wants to believe.

This is a pipe dream and will always be a pipe dream until we have a fully integrated and functional game on an official launch day.

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Crowe

If we count the earliest announcements, then that was like October 2012 or so. (and my hangar dates support that) Obviously, it was in a limited development state for some time prior to that though. But still, if I hold him to the October 2012 date as the start, he’s got about 2 years left and I don’t think he can do it.

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Sean Barfoot

In this week in which it was announced that Kotaku UK is closing, fondly remembering the reaction of Citizens to their amazing piece of investigate journalism on the games troubled development.

Suffice to say they thought everything was dead on track, and this painstakingly researched article (perhaps the only real investigate journalism anyone has actually done on this game) was denounced thoroughly as a hit piece.

That was four and a half years ago.

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PhoenixDfire

After backing the project 8 years ago, I finally upgraded my machine to the point where SC runs reasonable smoothly and had a walk around for the first time. I’ll admit from the quick ten minutes of walking around, it’s quite impressive. However, I’ll not be putting any more money into the project, mostly because of some of the misteps I’ve seen in it’s development.

I really hope they manage to get it right (or a lot better than Freelancer anyway), but I’ll continue to happily play ED for the moment.

Dantos
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Dantos

I don’t blame the developers for any of this, they’re doing what they’re told by their employer. Management/leadership needs to lock down the scope and features of the game and build that and save other fanciful ideas for post-launch content, which is a thing that happens now I’ve heard, games can get things added to them AFTER they release. I’m sure they’re going to have a cosmetic cash shop at least to fund this stuff.

I’ve noticed that the discourse around this game has grown steadily more cynical recently. Where before I saw an equal amount of mudslinging and defending, there doesn’t seem to be much defending anymore, a bit, but not much. Maybe everyone is happily playing the game, or maybe they’ve played and moved on, but it does feel like the attitude tide is changing on this.

I only have minor skin in this game, hopefully, one day I can enjoy it, I cant now because I mentally can’t invest in a game that is going to be wiped at some point. That’s why I can’t play betas or previews.

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Ozzie

I think it started to turn with the lack of updates and communication around Squadron 42. It was always a carrot-on-a-stick for SC backers and it appeared to be moving forward. Now I think it totally stalled and no one knows why. Theoretically, SQ42 should be easier to complete than the whole Star Citizen universe experience, so it’s alarming when there’s no progress there. Backers seemed to think SQ42 was a lynch pin in propelling SC forward, and releasing a solid Freelancer follow-up would destroy all criticism and validate the project, but that doesn’t seem to be happening.