Chronicles of Elyria is dropping virtual world platform SpatialOS

Chronicles of Elyria’s latest dev blog is out, and it’s more than just a recap of 2017 and look ahead to 2018, although it has that too: It makes the announcement that the game will no longer be utilizing SpatialOS.

“In January of 2017 we began the long process of taking what was mostly an offline, single-player game – designed primarily to validate user experience and gameplay feel – and turn it into a MEOW [Multiplayer Evolving Online World],” says Soulbound Studios. That meant integration with SpatialOS and Unreal Engine 4. But as development progressed, Soulbound explains, it ran into game elements (non spatial systems) that didn’t quite fit the architecture. What’s more, Soulbound argues, the studio was concerned that the game’s large size would make SpatialOS too expensive for it (and therefore for players) long-term.

“Of course, we brought our concerns to Improbable, and over the last eight months they’ve done a fantastic job working with us to try and bring the price down. Unfortunately, it remains an expensive solution for us. To make sure we were prepared, we began looking for alternative technology that could fill any gaps left behind if we were unable to use SpatialOS for any reason.”

Ultimately, the studio has dropped SpatialOS entirely “and is entirely built in the Soulborn Engine.”

“Their technology is still an extremely powerful solution for virtually all distributed simulations out there,” Elyria’s Jeromy “Caspian” Walsh concludes. “But for our particular technology choices and game mechanics, it just wasn’t the ideal solution.”

SpatialOS is billed by Google-partnered company Improbable as a “distributed computing platform for building large virtual worlds for gaming,” which made waves last year by picking up MMORPG veteran Bill Roper and half a billion dollars in venture capital from Japanese telecom SoftBank. The platform is being used for multiple MMOs and online games currently in production, including Worlds Adrift, Seed, IdentityFractured, and the secret thing Jagex is building. Improbable CEO Herman Narula captured the attention of MMO players last year as well when he declared in an interview that the genre has suffered a “nuclear winter.”

“I want the industry to believe in online games again,” he wrote. “We went through a bit of a nuclear winter, with MMOs in particular, and part of that was technological, part of that was gameplay and part of that was consumer expectation. But now the time is right to revitalise the notion of worlds where actions can be meaningful and where we can create these experiences that we’ve dreamed of. I am hoping that with us having this cash and having this stability, it’s going to make people excited about investing in that.”

Source: Official site. With thanks to Dro!
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Code of Conduct | Edit Your Profile | Commenting FAQ | Badge Reclamation | Badge Key

LEAVE A COMMENT

22 Comments on "Chronicles of Elyria is dropping virtual world platform SpatialOS"

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
socontrariwise

I have no technical background there so it would be great to have someone chime in who does. My main questions after reading their post are:

1) is it a good idea to write a MMO client of that graphical fidelity in javascript? I understand Java can be fast and efficient and is compiled, but javaSCRIPT??
2) I can’t imagine that things like AI etc which are essential to a MMO would drive the price up so much for hosting by SpatialOS. I understand that they have an offline-life-thing going but that isn’t bandwidth as this happens while player are offline – and you pay hosting based on bandwidth don’t you? Why would Spatial be so much more expensive than others? They should have discounts due to buying power?
3) Is it reasonable to assume that a bank-messaging system is fast enough for what a game needs? I only recall the Wish disaster when the network communication layer killed it all …

Reader
Sally Bowls

I understand Java can be fast and efficient and is compiled, but javaSCRIPT??

OMG, we have enough gaming religious wars without you poking the techies. :-)
A couple of decades ago, java was pretty slow and javascript was very slow. Now both have improved greatly and in particular have just-in-time compilers to speed things up a lot. Theoretically, javascript is at a real disadvantage. Practically, javascript is so important that a huge amount of work has gone into improving and optimizing it.

Reader
Dro Gul

How many games successfully have 100-200k characters/players simultaneously logged in to the same server? Of those how many have territory control with sieging and PvP? The only one that pops into my mind is EvE which is quite a different animal, but no true matches that I can think of. So what theoretically made this semi-believable was that this SpatialOS was going to bring new tech to the industry which would enable this.
Now instead they are relying on home made systems, from a tiny development team.

People bought because of the SpatialOS concept. If they really believe that their solution is equal or better then they should have no problem standing by that statement and allowing people to get their money back.

Reader
Tom316

There is NO possible way there small team built something that is comparable to SpatialOS. Improbable has a team of over 300 people with more then half of them dedicated to supporting and working on SpatialOS. These are some really smart people working on SpatialOS that spend long hours refining the system and making it the best it can be. There is NO chance that this small dev team created anything remotely close to being able to pull of networking and processing wise what they want to do.

And they are just now starting to work on the networking side of things. Something that devs with way more know how spend years and years working on. When was this game going to come out? last year? this year? 4 years from now?

I fully expect by the end of the year to hear that they are out of money and shutting up shop cause it was too hard for them.

Reader
Melissa McDonald

Asian MMOs seem to be developing amazing-looking games without these problems (cough cough)

Reader
Sally Bowls

Because they are making them for Asia

Take-Two Interactive: “We’re actively investing in online MMOs; we’re not doing it in the US. Why? Because MMOs don’t work here,” the company’s CEO Strauss Zelnick said on a conference in New York.

However, Take-Two sees Asia as a totally different market.

But there does not seem to be anything special here: a crowdfunded group lacks the money and expertise to make something as large as an MMO.

Reader
2Ton Gamer

They need to change their refund policy because this is straight up BS.

Reader
Dro Gul

I think we should see if they will offer refunds to people who pledged because they were told the game was using SpatialOS.

Reader
Kevin McCaughey

They would be shooting themselves in the foot if they do that. At least give them some time to explain and justify the replacement. They really need to do that for people to keep faith in the game. If you are one of the devs reading this, I hope you can come to us soon with a bit more detail to assuage our fears.

Reader
Dro Gul

They sold a game based on certain technology. Now all this time passes and they decide it was too expensive. They better offer refunds or I see even worse publicity coming soon.

Reader
Kevin McCaughey

What I am about to say I am not meaning for this MMO, but more a generalisation and a growing awareness for me for Kickstarters. If you wanted to just have a really well-paying job for a few years, all it takes is some decent looking mockups, some smoke and mirrors, plus some convincing bullshit on a regular basis.

Given the millions SC has, that’s the high life right there, plus the possibility of getting housing, cars etc as payment. I am starting to think the whole crowd finding gig is at best unrealistic expectations or at worst fraud? And to be clear I don’t mean this game. I think they are genuinely trying to make it and have convinced themselves they can, but we all know that building their own engine to take the place of SpacialOS is just totally unrealistic. I’m a backer, but I now don’t think it will be made.

What I am really not hoping to hear about this title is “Yaaay! We now switched to a partnership with Hero Engine!” (which I suspect may happen here) at which point I will cry and consider my money lost again. I should just play shot machines. In fact, fuck it, that’s what I am going to do right now and stop reading depressing news. Flashing lights, things spinning really quick, lots of happy noises and a balance that I only choose to spend £20 a month on. And when all is said and done it’s the same thing really – well right next to burning money.

Reader
Sally Bowls

We now switched to a partnership with Hero Engine!

As a bitter Repop backer, I certainly am not a fan of Hero Engine. at all. But as bad of an idea that HE would be, is it really worse than a small group, especially this group, trying to do their own engine?

Slot machines have better odds than crowdfunded games and you get free drinks. But Depressing in the game world can’t touch the real world.

    Luckily, this missile alert was a mistake.
icbmhi.JPG
Reader
Kevin McCaughey

SpatialOS was the hook for me backing it. This is almost like the disappointment I felt when The Revolution got put back on Hero engine. I think it’s a nail in the coffin for sure. The other games don’t have big budgets and they can afford it.

This is a bad sign to me and removes a lot of confidence in the game.

Loyheta
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Loyheta

Wait… no spatialOS? That is not cool. That was the main reason I backed… crap…

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Kickstarter Donor
Paragon Lost

MEOW [Multiplayer Evolving Online World]

Ugh, no. Just no. Stop with the damn acronyms.

Reader
Rolan Storm

:D :D :D

Reader
Scree

Yup, Vaporware. No way they have the experience to program an engine from scratch. Cashgrab call I made during its KS was spot on. GG.

Veldan
Reader
Patreon Donor
Veldan

Read the source instead of jumping to conclusions.

Mr. Bigglesworth
Reader
Mr. Bigglesworth

MEOW!