Dota 2 fans boycott ESL’s Facebook streaming platform over Twitch banwave

    
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lol, valve

In today’s edition of “who’s boycotting whom now,” it’s Dota 2 players’ turn in the spotlight!

According to Polygon, the community unrest began last week, when ESL announced that Facebook, not Twitch, would be the official platform for streaming the game’s pro tourneys. The first tournament under those rules, which happened to be in Malaysia, apparently caused numerous technical problems that prompted streamers to route the stream through Twitch so that people could actually watch it.

Of course, that also meant ESL’s advertisers weren’t being seen, and apparently Twitch was pressed into a major crackdown, copyright strike threats, and bans for players for hosting these “unauthorized” streams on its service – or more specifically, for those monetizing the content on Twitch, as explained by ESL.

That’s prompted the boycott of ESL’s streaming altogether; organizers on Reddit are urging Dota 2 fans to watch and stream on Twitch anyway to starve the ESL of eyeballs, arguing that the companies can’t possibly ban everyone. Which sounds like a challenge to me!

Dota was a custom mini-game that the players and viewers made into what it is today. Dota is nothing without all of us – they don’t get to tell us how and where we watch a game. ESL legally owns the casting and content, but Valve owns the games that you can view in their own client, and they permit streaming on Twitch. ESL does not own the pro players. ESL does not own Dota. Dota is so special because it grew out of the passion of players and fans, and we need to carry that legacy forward to keep the integrity of the game and community.”

Source: Polygon, Reddit
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Sorenthaz

ESL is honestly a pretty jokey organization as-is. Also you’d think that this stuff is viewable in-game through DotA 2’s services… if it isn’t, then that’s pretty screwed up.

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Arsin Halfmoon

Thats a really sexy Crystal Maiden

Veldan
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Veldan

The funny thing is that gamers probably did this to themselves. If you don’t want stuff to go via Facebook, don’t visit their Facebook page. If the Dota 2 page had 57 followers and 204 likes, they would not have made this decision. First there’s high traffic, and then decisions like this get made.

It’s the same, to a certain extent, as official forums vs reddit. People whine all the time about how official forums aren’t the main source of info anymore because devs post stuff on reddit, but if you look at the amount of activity in subreddits of games, you realize devs simply can’t ignore it anymore. Devs and companies really follow in this regard. If the masses flock to a certain site / platform, don’t be surprised to see expanded official use of that site / platforum.

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Armsbend

No it was because of an exclusive deal.

Veldan
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Veldan

Which probably wouldn’t have been signed if there wasn’t a significant Facebook presence of dota fans. From the AMA linked below:

“We believe in the long term value of this because Facebook is a platform which reaches more users than any other platform, and lots of players and teams have presence there already.”

“… the Dota 2 page on Facebook as 4.5 million fans – and they could all be watching the streams in theory. We believe that we can make more general fans of the game fans of its esports component.”

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Armsbend

Sure – FB is all pervasive. And they want a piece of the streaming pie.

Zulika Mi-Nam
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Zulika Mi-Nam

The big issue is that ESL was issuing DCMA takedowns for people who were not re-streaming their content. They were streaming using the in-game client known as DotaTV. 2 of those that received takedowns were well followed pros – BSJ & Admiral Bulldog.

… and then Valve came down and pimpslapped some reality into the situation.

DotaTV Streaming
January 25, 2018 – Dota Team

We’ve been seeing a bunch of discussion regarding DotaTV and want to expand on what we’ve said before.

The first issue we’ve been seeing discussed is regarding DMCA notices. This one is very simple: No one besides Valve is allowed to send DMCA notices for games streamed off of DotaTV that aren’t using the broadcasters’ unique content (camera movements, voice, etc).

The second issue is regarding who is permitted to cast off of DotaTV. We designed the DotaTV guidelines to be flexible in order to allow for up and coming casters, or community figures like BSJ or Bulldog that occasionally watch tournament games on their channel, to be able to stream off of DotaTV. It is not to allow commercial organizations like BTS to compete with the primary stream. It’ll be our judgment alone on who violates this guideline and not any other third party’s.

http://blog.dota2.com/2018/01/dotatv-streaming/

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Sorenthaz

Okay that’s screwed up. ESL is pretty much a joke of an esports organizer in the first place, but actually trying to send DMCAs is pathetic.

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Darthbawl

Interesting header pic, she is looking a bit cheeky in it! :P

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Zora

This is why games deserve to be promoted to the dignity of real sports!

Squabbles over advertisement and streaming rights, soon possibly legal gambling over games why not… some day, perhaps collectible stickers and T-shirts with the faces of team members?

The guy was right, future isn’t what it used to be anymore… :P

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Siphaed
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Rumm

Whatever moron at ESL decided to go with Facebook over Twitch for streaming a gaming tourney probably shouldn’t be in a position to ever make that decision again. There’s no way they could get the same viewer numbers on Facebook, and therefore are costing both their advertisers money, and their own brand recognition/sales from exposure. I really dislike Twitch’s content claims (you can only live stream through Twitch, can’t do YouTube simultaneously), but it’s still by far the leading platform for gaming. E3 manages to skirt those rules, I’m sure ESL could figure it out.

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Armsbend

FB probably paid ESL to do it.

Zulika Mi-Nam
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Zulika Mi-Nam

yes ESL was paid by FB to be the exclusive streamer of their content.

Zulika Mi-Nam
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Zulika Mi-Nam
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Bruno Brito

He didn’t knew that Twitch doesn’t require an account to view the stream.

“15 years in e-sports”, this guy is a joke.

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Sorenthaz

ESL is a joke in general. Their streams almost always have technical issues and they regularly run 5-10 minute ad breaks.

They’re pretty much the tournament organizers that games rely on when they don’t have a better option or can’t afford a better option.

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kgptzac

“I want to apologize for not hitting the right tone”

Lines like these are major bullshit, and reading the post is only open the door to more bullshit. Very irritating.

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McGuffn

I’m boycotting the superbowl until it is on Comedy Central. Get Mystery Science Theater to provide color commentary.

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Armsbend

Not the same and you know it brother. Facebook sucks a bag of rotten potatos and gamers like Twitch.

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Schmidt.Capela

This is why I really dislike exclusivity deals. One of the few things that can make me pirate a piece of content nowadays is exclusivity deals gone awry.

(And yeah, watching it on Twitch when there’s an exclusivity deal to only transmit it on Facebook is technically pirating content.)

Zulika Mi-Nam
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Zulika Mi-Nam

look at this quality stream.

8qb7opc437c01.jpg
Zulika Mi-Nam
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Zulika Mi-Nam

still better than the mobile version

RUPZlXB.jpg
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Armsbend

I like the wood in your home.