Inside Star Citizen talks about upcoming survival mechanics and releases the Anvil Carrack

    
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There’s a whole lot to talk about this week if you’re a Star Citizen fan, but one of the big topics is easily the release of the hotly anticipated Anvil Carrack ship, which is finally in-game and flyable now. There’s also the weekly video that details work on incoming survival mechanics, a traveler’s guide post that looks at microTech’s moons, and a little infographic with trivia about mining in the ‘Verse. In other words, lots to cover, so let’s get started.

In this week’s Inside Star Citizen video, we get a look at the Actor Status System, which is a five-dollar description for survival mechanics like hunger, thirst, and body temperature. The devs at CIG are trying to toe the line between making the needs of player avatars something to consider when traveling different worlds without making them the primary chore like in a typical survival sandbox. That said, players will soon need to pay attention to things like planet temperature, wind chill, and humidity, and bring the right kit unless they want to experience hyperthermia, hypothermia, and other physical maladies, all of which are demonstrated in the video.

On the much more fun side of things, the Anvil Carrack can now be flown. This exploration craft comes with a variety of features that were toured previously and looks built for a multiplayer crew. Purchasing the ship for real-world money will set you back between $500 – $650 depending on whether you get one with extras like a CBX Pisces shuttle or in-game shirt and plushie, while the ship should presumably also be available for in-game credits via the rental system.

In other Star Citizen news, the Traveler’s Guide post series has offered a look at Clio, Euterpe, and Calliope, providing a much more focused look at the environments of each moon, while the miners of the ‘Verse have been busy according to a new infographic, with over 200,000 hours spent crunching on space rocks.

And finally, furbish up your clients, testers: Long-term persistence is enabled in the latest build.

sources: YouTube, Spectrum, official site (1, 2, 3). Thanks Tazuras!
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Benjamin Sinnamon

I had been interested in playing Star Citizen when it launches, but the addition of survival mechanics pushes it into “I’ll pass” territory.

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Robert Mann

… There’s some bad jokes that come to mind here, but the best ones won’t be available until S.C. decides to make a vessel named after the Junk class of ship…

Godnaz
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Godnaz

Why should they stop developing and refining the project when people keep spending money to fund it? They made well over a million dollars over the past 2 days with the Carrack sales and it just keeps coming in. I havent pledged a penny in 4 years and it doesn’t change a thing.

@DeeKay: Remember when I said to come back around the release of Alpha 4.0 because there would be a few introduced gameplay loops? The roadmap changes, pushes all of that into 2021-22 provided Bind Culling/Server Meshing/Object Container Streaming blends well together in 2020. I understand why it’s taking so long but there is no need to play until 2022. (Alpha 6)

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Joe Blobers

Quote: “The roadmap changes, pushes all of that into 2021-22 provided Bind Culling/Server Meshing/Object Container Streaming blends well together in 2020. I understand why it’s taking so long but there is no need to play until 2022”

The reason to play as never been to enjoy a fully released and polished game but to help test new patch, with or without brand new gameplay.
Also not everything is on roadmap. Theater of War alone will be a reason to play for many and is not planned for 2021 but for the first half of this year.

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Jim Bergevin Jr

Sorry, but having to pay to test a game when a dev company should have a QA team on staff that gets paid to do just that has always been a bunch of BS. I know it’s been the trend in gaming the last half decade, but it doesn’t make it any less sleazy than the lockbox controversy.

And if you think that there will be any playable content in the “game” this year, let alone in the next 3 months, well … crazy pretty much sums up the mental state of the whales in this thing.

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ichi sakari

there’s mining, hauling, lots of combat, caving, and of course PvP, so you’ve over-reached a little when you imply there’s not ‘any playable content’

I also don’t understand the need to use perjoratives when describing the backers, yeah CIG is def whaling – but your basic assumption that anyone who supports this or has hope for it is crazy is simply you thinking you’re smarter and less crazy than some people you don’t know, all because they disagree with you about something

SC is an interesting project, trying it sometime will either confirm your pre-conceived ideas or change them, but at least you’ll have first hand knowledge about what your commenting on

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Jim Bergevin Jr

I have, it did, and I do.

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angrakhan

Well, while I agree the ‘good ol days’ of having a free invite-only closed beta was the best for gamers (which for most who got the invites it amounted to a free, extended demo… they don’t actually test much) it does make a lot of business sense to charge for the privilege if you have a bunch of willing fans available to do it. If you can get the same level of testing as a free closed beta while charging for the game, I’m pretty sure you would do the same if you were in the captains chair at a dev studio. It’s real easy to sit back in your armchair and impugn the developers when it’s not your ass on the line either to your publisher or your crowd-funding backers while you have to make payroll. I mean no one is forcing people to back SC and test it (or any other game). They’re doing it willingly. As long as people are willing, studios are going to do it. It’s easy to lay blame at the studio, but I think the gamers at a minimum share in the responsibility here since they’re the ones clawing their way to the front of the line cash in hand.

As far as having a QA team goes, there’s limits to that. Even if a studio had an army of 50 or 100 QA personnel putting in 10 hour days, they still wouldn’t be able to touch the man hours of testing having 2.5 million volunteer testers banging on the game. It’s just not anywhere close to feasible. You would bankrupt a company trying to hire that many testers. 100 QA testers aren’t nearly enough to test a game as vast as Star Citizen with every combination and permutation of possible actions the gamers will take once the game is live. Relying solely on internal QA to test any game is a recipe for disaster come launch.

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Jim Bergevin Jr

And you can put those same overarching themes right on top of the lockbox argument. It still doesn’t make either one right or any less sleazy.

For many, many years I played many, many alphas and betas for games. Never once (until recent history) did I ever have to pay for the “privilege.” QA is part of the cost of doing business in game (heck, software development). There is no legit excuse to not have it as a developer. Yes there are limits, but again that’s why we have (or used to have) those public
test beds during the course of development.

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Kickstarter Donor
NeoWolf

Hmm $350 for a ship in a game that hasn’t even completed a single entire solar system… yeah, but no. I’ll wait until its out and earn on in game via PLAYING, but thanks anyway lol

I mean we’re not actually buying the ship anyway per se, all your really buying is lifetime insurance for that ship…and the way I see it is if by the time you have enough in game cash to buy that ship, your likely also going to have enough to insure it so why bother, you know.. :) If we buy all the ships before the game starts then what is the point of playing the game…one huge incentive will alreayd be gone.

I think they should focus on using the 241 million dollars they already have and like finish the game already… which is many years overdue already.

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ichi sakari

having an ASS will eventually be necessary for all types of gameplay

Carrack jumped way up in price the kids are wigging out about the $25 cosmetics, but of course there’s quite a few systems in it that don’t work – the chart/map room, the extending antennae, the pool table (literally unplayable) – and some design issues like the only ground access is the big ramp (needs an elevator that opens to the ground in addition)

the big news is a form of long term persistence, we’ll keep our earned cash and most of the in-game purchases (like weapons and armor and ship components) through some patching, although wipes are still certain to occur they should be less frequent, which is a significant QoL improvement and should increase player-tester numbers

the whaling has hit a fever pitch

“Call me Ishmael, dummy” – The Dummies Guide to Moby Dick

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Bereman
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Bereman

So…what I’m getting is that Inside Star Citizen wanted to talk about A.S.S. – the Actor Status System.

:D

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Natalyia

Call it madness or genius, years ago I threw some mad-money at a Carrack – and she’s finally here. Gotta say it’s every bit the ship I was hoping it would be.

First star on the right, straight on ’till morning. Or maybe “we aim to misbehave.” But in any case, adventure awaits. :)

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angrakhan

Yes, beautiful ship. Congratulations on that beauty. It’s not really my bag, personally, as I like things that go pew pew boom, but I can still appreciate a really nice ship. Looks like lots of adventures are in your future.

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Hikari Kenzaki

Chris, if you want a tour, I’m sure that can be arranged. :)

It really is all the best parts of your favorite sci-fi movies worked into one big ship.

And when we were flying around with a shuttle, cyclone, and hoverbike stored inside as we blasted a few dozen enemies out of the sky, it really did feel like a ‘home’ ship.

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micedicetwice
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micedicetwice

“Adventures” lol.

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Solaris

You must need friends.

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Natalyia

Shrug Star Citizen is in no way a polished, released game. And it is certainly not in a state where people who are expecting that will have fun with it.

But yes, we have adventures in Star Citizen. We explore places in ships, vehicles or speeder-bikes, find caves (and get lost in caves) mine rocks (and occasionally get killed by exploding rocks carelessly mined) we fight claim-jumpers, hunt bounties, deliver cargo, investigate derelicts & downed satellites, and clean out hostiles from bunkers.

And yeah, sometimes the adventure is “oh – time to rescue my friend who’s fallen out of the spaceship in flight” or “huh. you don’t see a ship dance like that everyday.” or “Why won’t they take our credits to fix the ship here?” or “Hmm. I thought the bridge was supposed to have atmosphere.”

But it’s still an adventure, and it’s still a story to remember, and opportunities to take gorgeous pictures. If it’s not for you (or anyone) yet, that’s cool. If you think the game’s a boondoggle and will never be finished you’re entitled to that opinion, and time will tell. But adventures are to be had in Star Citizen, even in its current state.

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Jim Bergevin Jr

And all those exact same adventures can be easily had in one form or another in dozens of other games that are fully featured and fun right now, and were made that way for a fraction of the cost and development time. Some may not look as pretty, but as the old adages go: Looks aren’t everything; and you can put lipstick on a pig, but at the end of the day, it’s still a pig.

Where are we at now? 7, 8, maybe 9 years now of development. It’s been so long I really have lost count. How many millions of dollars? And what is there to show for it? I think it was Arktouros who said in the comments on another article that this is nothing more than a Tech Demo. And he’s right. All SC amounts to is really nothing more than an interactive cinematic trailer. For the time of development and the amount of money raked in to make a GAME, that is a travesty of gaming industry development. If people enjoy what they have for the money they spent, that’s fine, that’s on them and their value for the dollar. But to pretend that this is the way things should be done, that is as much BS as that original $10 Horse Armor was.

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Joe Blobers

Quote:”And all those exact same adventures can be easily had in one form or another in dozens of other games

SC never intended to be the first to create ships, fps or caves.

The beauty is to have (at release with all gameplay) x others games packed in one universe full of social, economic or military interactions, together with features no others games have (dynamic weather on planet 1/6th the size of real one) in addition of cool features, you may use or not like FOIP, which by the way can also simulate Track-ir to fly/drive your vehicle with your own webcam.

All for 45$ or so.

About “the time of development and the amount of money raked in to make a GAME, that is a travesty of gaming industry development
You probably missed the concept of starting from scratch (12 guys, no pipelines, 6m$) to develop two ambitious triple-A’s.
Diablo3 took +10 years and BG&E2 announced +10 years ago is not even in sight, both from multi-billionaire companies with thousands of devs and up-to-date pipelines at day one… Anthem have to be re-worked from ground… talk about how thing have to be done in gaming industry…

Factually this project is delivering on short term (playing Alpha) and long term (proving more can be done with less) more to the gamer community than dozens of shallow copy/paste sequels done by publishers.
And if you are not the type of guy able to handle true Alpha, which is fine, you can just wait on the fence and test from time to time one of the multiple free weeks per year. Another strike to the gaming industry good practice to release games without review or in “beta” a month before official release.

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Jim Bergevin Jr

A lot of those other things you mentioned are travesties as well. I can name more – Day 1 DLC, Launch Day Bug Fix Patches. The list goes on and on. Still doesn’t excuse not make any less of a tragedy what we have with SC. Obsolescense is the name of the game in this business, and regardless if what they dream to accomplish, there are others out there who are dreaming and doing the same things.

I’m used to Alphas and Betas. I know exactly what to expect. CIG is a chef in the kitchen who has dreamed of a super fantastic recipe, and charged a premium price for the good seats in the restaurant. Problem is, the food has been cooking for far too long, and is mostly starch with very little protein for the price. Sorry if I expect at lot more meat with my potatoes by this time and for the amount raked in by the cover charge.

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Joe Blobers

Quote:” there are others out there who are dreaming and doing the same things
Sure, so many I can play released games offering what SC have in Alpha… in fact no. There is no space game remotely close to what offer SC.
For sure many do enjoy ED (I back it as well), NMS or Eve, each one offering a different space game experience. The advantage vs SC? they are released with polished gameplay, nothing more… and I am not even playing NMS or Eve despite being released and patched since years.
The tragedy is not about having bugs in Alpha of such grand scope project but to have publishers not caring at all about gamer community.

Quote:” and charged a premium price for the good seats in the restaurant
Not correct. Only a starter package is needed, you can grab bigger ships with in game Credits, solo or with friends/Org. It could take hours, days or even month it does not matter. MMO goal is not to get all assets in hands in few days but to interact with others.

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Jim Bergevin Jr

MMO goal is not to get all assets in hands in few days

Unless you want to crack open the safe, then it’s OK!