Osiris: New Dawn’s Survival update doubles down on survival mechanics and improves performance

    
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If you prefer more “survival” in your survival sandbox gaming, then last week’s appropriately named Survival update to Osiris: New Dawn is likely going to be right up your alley, as the update has put a greater emphasis on survival mechanics: Environmental hazards are more brutal, tools will have to be repaired as they deteriorate, hunger and thirst will have to be more closely mitigated, and nighttime will be “intensely dark and excruciatingly cold.”

It’s not all scrabbling to get by in this new update, however. There’s also a host of improvements to performance thanks to an update to Unity along with improvements to framerate and memory usage, and multiplayer updates have been made, with public servers cycling to a new universe every two weeks, better multiplayer syncing, and better multiplayer balance and stability.

If Osiris: New Dawn has fallen off of your radar, there’s a rundown in The Survivalist to get you acclimated, while our own MJ has streamed her sojourn in the game back in February 2018. As for recent events, the devs at Fenix Fire Entertainment handed some employees their walking papers and posted a Trello board to alleviate player complaints of limited communication — complaints that still linger in the game’s Steam reviews.

source: Steam
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Dug From The Earth

The thing that turned me off to this game was one simple thing

You go exploring, find the remains of an old outpost…. and are 100% unable to salvage anything from it for your own use.

Whats the point of exploring?

EmberStar
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EmberStar

It depends on the game. It seemed a little more palatable in Subnautica, and even came with an in-game excuse for why. Visiting ruins and wrecks wasn’t a complete waste of time because you could often scan things and add them to your tech tree. There were also journal entries and often supplies that you were allowed to take in crates and lockers.

The excuse part was that your fabricator tool had a specific programing block against allowing you to damage anything of potential value to the company that made it. The crashed starship and bigger pieces of wreckage were both grave sites and company property. The other ruins you could find were of historical or forensic interest. But you were free to pick up random pieces of scrap, collect it and process it for survival needs. (The value of the scrap would be added to your bill. Everything you mined, found or salvaged was already company property because they said so.)

EmberStar
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EmberStar

I am not a fan of item decay in games like this. Especially one were we’re talking about picks and shovels made from modern materials. My uncle has had the same crowbar and shovel and wrenches for over 50 *years.* It’s frankly just insulting that games seem to consider it normal that tools would break after a single *afternoon.*

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Vanquesse V

if you *really* want some kind of upkeep, fuel or power fits so much better for modern/future tech and tools

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Sleepy

Yeah, subnautica does this via the fact that everything needs batteries or power cells, and discovering more advanced batteries means everything lasts longer. Don’t make the player work for their toys and then take them away.

MilitiaMasterV
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MilitiaMasterV

I agree. But, the other side of this being that since this is a game that can explore other worlds, and the various hazards involved there-in, your hab modules for example should not be ‘immune to the elements’ and depending on the harshness of the world, should require steady in-put to keep them in ship-shape, or to learn the environment’s dangers before they are destroyed. For example, for all we know, another planet could manifest organisms that eat plastic/metal and landing on them, we’d quickly have problems and would have to research a way around them. (TECH TREES!!)

For survival games, eventually learning how to get around the danger/creating something that provides a way to remove the need/danger if you work hard enough at it should be a challenge accepted thing, until that point, you should have to deal with it. (And they shouldn’t be allowed to just keep you from removing the need/figuring out a way to get ahead of it.)

I mean, for example, using food/thirst as a survival mechanism…why couldn’t you eventually research a tech that allows your body to just ‘absorb’ molecules from your environment that fill that need once you advance enough? I mean, it makes sense if you’ve just landed that you wouldn’t know what you needed to use there, but after having spent a long time there you would have adapted…or learned the local flora/fauna enough to know what you could/couldn’t grow to sustain yourself…as another example. I mean, when you’re first learning, if you just pop it in your mouth and die because it causes a heart attack, then someone’s learned something about your environment. (I don’t suggest just eating random ‘alien’ life…especially as it could be sentient and that would make you a murderer…)

These types of games leave so much potential but then don’t use it…

quark1020
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quark1020

You’re right, but games run on creative logic, not realism.

If it did, not only would survival tools last much MUCH longer than an afternoon, but it would also take much longer to build even a basic powered habitat.