Star Wars: The Old Republic cracks down on RMT ring

    
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Classic.
In the MMO community, shady websites selling game currency for real currency are considered especially heinous. In Star Wars: The Old Republic, these operations are shut down by an elite squad known as the Creditseller Destroyers. OK, not really; we don’t know what it’s called. We just know that it’s been active because we’ve been informed that it just busted up a nice big credit-selling ring.

It might not even be a squad at all, but that doesn’t play into a Law & Order joke.

A post on the official SWTOR forums reveals that the team had been watching a large ring that spanned hundreds of accounts and took action to shut the whole thing down at once. The net result was hundreds of accounts banned and over nine billion credits removed from the circle. You can probably make your own jokes about whether or not the sellers in question would have made the Hutts proud.

[Source: Official forums; thanks to Tibi and Khalith for the tip!]
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Morreion
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Morreion

breetoplay Spacejesus3k mmonerd 
Bank robbers find ‘work’ a grind.  Until the crappy grind of work is gone, they will rob banks I guess.

I always thought ‘go play a MOBA or FPS’ would be a better answer to all of this complaining about having to level up.  MMOs almost by definition take time and effort to get to the end, that’s their niche :)

seventhbeacon
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seventhbeacon

Awesome victory, SWTOR! Way to stick it to these lowlifes.

zackman2k12
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zackman2k12

I do not see what the goddamn big deal with RMT is. you should NOT fuck with people’s incomes. it shoiuldnt be considered a black market at all! just because some people are uppity about it doesnt mean the majority want rmt to not exist.

paragonlostinspace
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paragonlostinspace

Nine Billion credits. Damn.

jonny_sage
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jonny_sage

Budukahn mmonerd I have a China IP block on my PC. And it blocks tens of thousands of IPs a day. So at least it works a little.

jonny_sage
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jonny_sage

Why would anyone use SWTOR to try and make money off of? Not that many customers.

Budukahn
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Budukahn

mmonerd Budukahn Don’t worry, it’s not an unreasonal suggestion.  It just doesn’t work sadly.  It was something I wondered about back when I worked as a GM many moons ago – why we didn’t just ban Chinese IP’s.  Turned out that, not only did we hit legitimate players when banning by region since people were playing from China for plenty of legitimate reasons), but when we did try it they just did what I said.  First it was to other Asian country IPs like Vietnam and then they just started routing through Swiss IP’s. 
Sadly as I discovered in my two-three years on the job, they’re a pretty wily lot.  And thanks to the exchange rate, even a few hundred dollars is huge incentive for these groups.

chriskovo
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chriskovo

Uhuh but what about the account they block erroneously and then do not respond to tickets opened about the accounts? My friend had his blocked tried to contact ea about having it resolved or at least finding out why it was blacklisted and not one damn response from EA in 2 months of emails and phone calls to customer service. That is just bullshit.  He had recently just purchased the new expansion and was about to get back into the game and they did that.  After 2 months of no response from their internal team that handles these, he cancelled the charges on his card and im out a friend to play with on the game.   Haven’t played it since, since I would not be fun without him.   Its just dumb you do not ignore your player base especially one that just gave you more money for the new expansion.   Regular customer service could not even help him, its completely un professional that you do not respond to people one these cases.

cromahr
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cromahr

breetoplay Spacejesus3k mmonerd I totally get where you are coming from, and of course, it’s usually quicker to buy gold than earn it.. there are many people reporting easily earning millions in SWTOR or hundreds of thousands in WOW, but I think the majority struggles a lot (I think that last year or the year before, some site reported that the average WOW player has what, 8-12K gold? Or less?)
However, that doesnt make buying it right. It also makes it questionable how much fun the game or whether you should be playing it if you “cheat” like that, and I think it’s a safe thing to say that RMT ruined the economy in quite a few games, and so those players who want better gear easily and quickly often make it worse by buying into that already messed up economy by blowing way too much gold (bought with RM) for gear or whatever.
What would be a good way to fix this? Not sure? Maybe make it so that you can’t buy stuff from other players (or vendors for gold), hence take away the motivation to buy ingame currency, but then again, I think a lot of players rely on such items to gear up their main or alts, to get into, say, raiding, or because they don’t have the time to grind for them. And even those players, most companies don’t wanna get rid off or chase away by cutting off a chance to get around the grind.

AdeptusEnginus
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AdeptusEnginus

breetoplay Spacejesus3k mmonerd That isn’t entirely a justification though. By now It is safe to assume that the average MMO player knows how shady that whole scene is, and how detrimental to the game they play’s economy it can be. The fact they do it regardless of that knowledge places a good portion of the blame directly at their feet, regardless of the mechanics behind it.

I would agree the solution really is that the mechanics should be tuned so that the grind is not so daunting as to make the alternative appealing, but that doesn’t make the folk who decide to go the RMT route blameless. It’s not really so clear cut; after all, we’ve seen what can happen when an MMO gives too much away for free just as much as we’ve seen what happens when they don’t give enough away, and that applies to any MMO regardless of pay model. There’s a fine line that is very difficult to narrow down, especially cause’ it varies from game to game. What works for one game may not work for another.