New World cleared 200,000 concurrent beta players over the weekend

    
38

You have to imagine that there are some Amazon Game Studios executives and producers who are breathing a little easier this week after seeing the phenomenal response to New World’s closed beta test. Not only is the beta itself getting great reviews and word-of-mouth, but it’s absolutely packed with players eager for a good, new MMORPG to play.

In fact, SteamDB clocked 200,856 concurrent players yesterday, making a new high-water mark for New World since its beta started on July 20th. We shouldn’t have to tell you, but those are really, really good numbers that bode quite well for the game’s release on August 31st.

Thanks to the lack of an NDA on the test, we’ve been able to report our own experiences, including Sam’s look at a battleground and dungeon. Sam said of the test, “It’s evident the team behind New World has been really plugging away and putting together a game that feels like a real MMO.”

Source: SteamDB
Advertisement

No posts to display

38
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
John Mclain

I went into it expecting a total pile of garbage, which is all that Amazon is known for so far. It was better than I expected, not garbafge, but not a “good” game either. Still that makes this the first game from Amazon to not be utter and complete garbage, so thats high praise I suppose. Not sure I’ll play it after launch, depends if I have anything else to play next month or not.

Reader
Zedness

Servers down post:

The game is far from perfect… all are, especially in beta after a complete rewrite, etc.

The question is: is there a solid, long-term MMO here that a community can build itself around and have fun?

Possibly. I’m excited to see what happens.

New World plays a lot like Archeage without the labor, property issues & cash shop sinks that ruined that otherwise great, community-driven, PvP sandbox game. There isn’t as yet a “caravan delivery” dynamic to force big fights the way Archeage had, but it sounds like that kind of thing is coming down the pike, and fights abound right now so it’s isn’t exactly lacking.

Territories are controlled by the factions, there is a constant war over those territories (always monitored on your map). Once pushed into war status an actual instanced fight happens between them with a roster you can sign up for at a set time, winner takes all. Territory owners (guilds) determine different tax rates that have big consequences for the territory and the guild holding it. If the enemy is winning too much favor in the territory, the owning faction can work to stop them completing PvP quests in the region.

So the big server-wide gameplay loop is to group up in PvP roaming groups/solo, complete quests and kill other parties trying to complete largely the same quests.

Everyone in your faction wants the same thing. In the first hours people were happily sending gold off to strangers in their faction to help buy a territory or accomplish other goals – everyone wins so there’s no reason not to – and there’s lots in the game to foster that cooperation.

This action gets the server factions actually working together and fighting each other as intended. This is what Warhammer Online did so well that I’m hoping will see similar success here.

Having said all that… I’ve gotten to level 28 without a single bit of PvP and I’ve still loved every moment. I’ve completed quests I actually enjoy (because they are mostly combat oriented, often breaking camps), the first dungeon is no worse than any other first dungeon I’ve been in, the PvE rewards are great, the levelling is extremely varied and you can change things up as you go along.

There’s also a lot of polish here that is going unnoticed me thinks. This game looks and feels very good.

It sounds amazing. Walking through a canyon near a town you’ll see people working on harvesting all the surrounding resources, but you’ll also hear them. You can hear combat over the hill you’re climbing before you get there. You can actually use sound in the context of PvP here the way you can in Overwatch or an fps.

If Amazon turns on a cash shop in this environment like Archeage did, then this will tank immediately. I don’t think Amazon really wants to try and nickel and dime their new audience… I’ve always suspected they are using New World as a way to cultivate a much larger gaming userbase they can market to over the coming years. Not sure they even care if they make money yet.

The other game this feels like to me is SWG.

The open ended crafting, the ease and simplicity of the crafting, the need for crafting… all feel very similar to SWG except for things like the extractors we used, etc.

But the constant PvP struggles happening all around, the territory claims and intrigue this sets up… all similar feels to SWG and Archeage.

I can see why people think the combat is weird, buggy, etc (and it is still rough for sure), but there’s a bit of twitch going on here with some real accuracy required when clicked that I actually really enjoy. You even have to skill shot some heals, and skill shots really pay off in this game.

I see a rudimentary combat system that is rough around the edges but is a good platform they can build on, not something that needs a complete rethink.

I think the combat is really quite fun and I know a lot of players agree.

I think this has some real legs (completely the opposite of what I expected), especially knowing the deep pockets behind it. That they did what they did in the last two years is evidence they can not only produce that kind of money, they have no trouble spending it.

If you’re an RvR fan of any description, I have to imagine this game is a “must play” for you. Warhammer Online, DAoC, SWG, if you liked the WvW/RvR nature of those games you’ll probably dig this.

Reader
Vanquesse V

I thought it was pretty clever to have the forts not only apply a 20% increase to the effect the owner has on the territory control aspect of pvp for the zone, but also apply a 5% exp bonus AND a faction wide bonus unique to each fort.

Reader
Zedness

i keep seeing all kinds of clever stuff in here the more it opens up to me.

Reader
Bereman99

The one thing with the combat is I can’t figure if I’m the one that is missing something, or if it’s just the current iteration.

So I do really like how the projectiles you’d expect to be physical items to dodge actually are – thrown hatchets, thrown spears, arrows. You can get out of the way after it starts its traversal if you’re quick enough, and the hit boxes on these feels really tight. Muskets, on the other hand, have bullets – and you’re not really gonna be dodging that once it goes off, so it’s more a “bait if you can so that they miss the shot entirely” kind of feel to it.

The sound effects sound good and animations of each weapon I’ve tried look good and overall detailed. Damage doesn’t feel too high or too low for “on level” enemies when keeping your gear up to date.

So I look at all that…and then in the combat, it feels like I’m sometimes just clicking left-mouse button to do the same basic 3-part attack combo over and over and trading blows with whatever I’m fighting, and depending on the weapon using a bigger damage attack when it’s ready or holding a counter/dodge ability…

And those dodge/counter abilities feel really underwhelming. Like the Riposte on Rapier – it normally stuns the enemy for 1 second, with a talent to boost it to 2 seconds. Except the stun ends as soon as you hit the mob.

Which – rapier, a fast attack weapon. You’re going to be hitting it *right* after you stun it. So what should be a 2 second stun for a relatively tight window of timing (I believe it’s a second or so) needed to successfully riposte turns into one that is less than a second. I even ended up recording me using it to test, and sure enough – knocked off immediately upon attacking, lasts the full 2 seconds if I do nothing.

Same with the Evade ability on that same weapon – it seems to work and give you the brief immunity when dodging the bigger heavy attacks where the enemy glows before attacking. As much as I’ve tried, I’ve not had it actually make me immune to normal attacks from creatures. It even whips me around to the back of an enemy if I’m close enough and I’m pressing left or right on my keyboard…and I still see the red number pop-up from taking a normal attack. Not sure if it’s meant to work that way, or just isn’t working properly yet.

So as a result, those abilities are just underwhelming – and there’s others in other weapon lines that suffer from the same kind of “that’s it?” feeling.

But I don’t know if that’s cause I’m missing something with how we’re meant to approach combat (outside of PvP at least) or if it really does have this lackluster loop to it that undercuts the parts that are really good. Maybe it’s from the game restricting us to 3 abilities, instead of a slightly more open 4 or 5. Maybe it’s from my decision to use a bow/spear or musket/rapier combo, instead of two complimentary (attribute-wise) melee weapons, where I’d be able to cycle through the abilities of two weapons up close.

It feels like it’s almost there for me, but I can’t figure out what is missing and why the combat isn’t pulling me in the way the atmosphere and aesthetic and gathering and crafting have.

Reader
Bhagpuss Bhagpuss

It was good in the original alpha. It was good in last year’s preview. It’s always been good. The whole “surprise” thing baffles me. It’s like people want these games to fail.

Stefan
Reader
Stefan

I -think-,

When people look at a new MMO they compare it to their best MMO experience, what is generally their first MMO experience they had, what made them overlook a a lot of the flaws that game had as they look back with rose tinted glasses.

Or they also assume it is reasonable to think a new MMO launches with the same amount of content of a MMO that has been out 5 to 10 years and beyond.

Reader
Ravven

Speaking just for myself, I didn’t expect a lot after knowing they tried a full-on PvP game, found that it wasn’t a great experience for a lot of people, and then added more PvE elements after the fact. I fully expected a complete mess, and it so very much wasn’t. I loved it. Sure it could do with more story and lore, but I know it’s probably difficult to add that after you have a full game. Even without it, though, it’s still satisfying. And such a gorgeous world.

Reader
styopa

200k people so completely bored with the games they’ve been playing for more or less 10 years straight that they’re willing to try literally any AAA game that strolls down the path isn’t much to be proud of.

The number of people that log on FOR THE NEXT one, that’s going to determine whether they can breathe easier.

Reader
Phil Webb

Are you the anointed representative of 200 thousand people? Speak for yourself.

Reader
styopa

comment image
Settle down there Francis.

My point is that getting people in a stagnant marketplace to ‘give a look’ to something new isn’t a huge challenge.
The bigger challenge – and the really interesting metric – is going to be whether that number goes up or down for the next run. If word of mouth is good, and I think it was, you’re going to get those people PLUS the people they got interested with their comments/opinions.

THAT’S the number that matters to things like investors and C-suite bosses.

Reader
Anthony Clark

I had a great time

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Richard de Leon III

Sigh, much as I would love to dive into a new mmo…I just cant. My new work has been working me ragged to the point I know I wont have the time to play any mmo serious enough to be able to keep up, new or old.

Cant wait til i retire and play more in a couple of decades…

Stefan
Reader
Stefan

I am also rather busy in real life and with work, the upside to this game is it is B2P game so you can play it in short bursts and while you will miss out on a lot of the more dedicated faction and guild warfare, you would still be able to do things on your own speed.

Depending how the community evolves of course if they start adding certain absurd gear and what not requirements.

Reader
Rob Hagaman

I’ve been pleasantly surprised, so far. They make the grind fun, and I love the fight animations. The simplicity of the combat lends itself well to action combat. The NPCs will move and dodge about as well as a player, at times; and they are just hard enough to not just be a walk-through. There have already been some nice company battles on our server(Antillia).

What I enjoy most is the world itself. The magic of the world explains respawns and even why we don’t die. I’m sure other games have; but this game fits it better into the lore. The tie in to an Atlantean/North American theme is unique, as well. While it follows many of the mechanics of your typical fantasy MMO, the package is nice enough to make it fresh.

This is the best beta I’ve played in a while; and I can’t wait for the end of August.

Reader
angrakhan

Just to be clear, though, Sam’s linked article above isn’t exactly glowing. If I were to boil his essay-length article down to a single word it would be ‘meh’.

Reader
John Mclain

And that perfectly sums up the game in my opinion. “meh”

Reader
Ravven

I loved it a LOT more than I thought I would. I just hope they fix server stability, as it was difficult spending more than 15/20 minutes at a time logged in this weekend (it was a lot more stable during the week).

Reader
Rob Hagaman

Sounds like a local problem. I haven’t had any drops since I started playing, and I was on 5 hours at one point. Or maybe it’s that particular server.

Reader
Ravven

It seemed to be mainly the EU servers, I think. We had maintenance each morning until noonish, and then the servers would start lagging and going down again. Plus the server that I’d landed on (Kamma) seemed to be the worst one, sigh… :D

Reader
Arktouros

Yea not at all unexpected. First major NA themepark MMO release in a long time was going to be super popular and have a lot of pop for the first 2-3 months after release.

The bigger question mark the game is going to have is what does it look like a month or two after when games like Lost Ark hit or Final Fantasy launches it’s next expansion. How good will they be at continuously updating content post release as PvE players chew through the existing content and run out of things to do? I mean they created an entire PvE game in the span of a year from basically nothing which was crazy impressive but will they keep that kinda staff on hand post release? Time going to tell.

Reader
bobfish

Most of the content was there prior to the preview, they added a couple of new zones for high levels and five expeditions. The rest is just a rework of the existing content (faction/settlement quests are useful now for example).

I’m looking forward to launch and will definitely enjoy myself on the way to max level and participating in everything that is there. But the concern from last year of a lack of content still exists and we’ll have to see how frequently they can release things. Two zones and five dungeons a year would be very nice (ESO levels of content releases).

Reader
Arktouros

You’re thinking of wrong versions of the game.

The original PvP version of New World that was Alpha tested originally was completely bare bones. It had like 7 different mob types (zombie, ghost, bear, boar, bison, wolf etc). It had no quests. It had no NPCs. It was entirely sandbox style game with T3 workstation outposts and a marketplace. That was it. There were no combat skills, it was all LMB/RMB power style attacks via a Dark Souls style combat system.

So for them to take the whole game down and basically use all those assets and create a somewhat functional themepark game that you mostly know today with character skills, quests and otherwise is extremely impressive for a year. The fact it took them another year for 5 more dungeons and an end game area….ehhhh…we’ll see.

Reader
bobfish

I’m not thinking of the wrong version, I’ve only played the preview and this CBT. There is no new variety in mobs between then and now, except maybe in those higher level zones they added, but nothing up to 40 is new, just readjusted to give more to do in each area.

Reader
Arktouros

You literally just admitted you’re thinking of the wrong version of the game than what I was talking about.

Why even bother responding if you can’t be bothered to read what it is I’m actually saying to give a coherent and relevant response?

Reader
bobfish

No I’m not, I said “most of the content was there prior to the preview” because it was IN the preview.

I don’t know if they added it one month before the preview or one year before the preview, but it was there during the preview. Therefore it had to have been added before it.

So my point is valid, in the last twelve months they added a couple of zone and five dungeons. Everything else is a rework of existing content that was already in the game.

Reader
Arktouros

To which again you are: I was never talking about the preview. Why are you using the preview to disqualify my statement when it is not relevant to my statement?

From the original PvP alpha of the game, where there was nothing, a year later they created the majority of the content you see in the preview. Saying the content in the game a year later from said preview hadn’t significantly changed does not refute or invalidate my original statement that in that year time they created an entire game where there was none.

Your point is invalid, incoherent and irrelevant.

Reader
bobfish

You’re the one that assumed I was talking about the same time period as you. I wasn’t, I was talking about the last twelve months and I thought that was pretty obvious from what I wrote.

I wasn’t trying to contradict you or say anything you said was false, I was adding additional commentary about the game’s development.

Reader
Arktouros

If that’s the case then I would have thought you’d have clarified that in your first response but alright, guess it took 4.

Reader
Bruno Brito

This game gives me ESO vibes. It’ll suffer a lot early, and IF Amazon is actively paying attention to the industry, instead of trashing it, they’ll invest in it to become a solid experience.

But Amazon is not Zenimax. They might as well just crush it all if they don’t see the money entering.

Reader
Simon Gördén

The money is being spent and more and more are buying the game. Lets Imagine that 200k (peak concurrent) spent the lowest amount, that would equal to 8m$. Not everyone that bought the game was online during the weekend, me included, and some bought the deluxe edition. They are Rolling in money. All they gotta do is understand that People believe in thier game flaws or not.

Betakeys are not really being handed out either. Fextralife (time of writing theres 27k People watching) on Twitch have given out a grand total of 90 Keys. So the majority of players actually bought the game..

Reader
Bruno Brito

I mention ESO not financially, but design-wise. ESO had issues with direction and design earlier. I see the same happening with NW. It’ll take a while for it to become it’s own thing.

Reader
Arktouros

Again the issue isn’t really initial sales. They’re going to or have sell a fuckload of the game for sure. You can also tell with things like fewer abilities on the combat system and very console friendly UI that this game will most likely end up on consoles to rake in even more initial cash.

However the big goal for any kind of “live service” style product is the subscriptions/cash shop “upsells” that really justify the whole thing long term. Once the initial sales offset years of development costs you start veering into profit territory.

However all that only works if you have a paying customer base long term and people only stay with games if they have reasons to do so. That means having to re-invest into creating more content to keep people there or at the very least to come back to the game later.

Reader
Arktouros

Yea we do know that Amazon has been really, really quick to drop projects that start failing. As a themepark game they are entirely reliant on a steady supply of content drip (same as ESO, FF14, WOW, etc) to keep people there or coming back. If they’re unwilling to invest in all that it’ll end poorly.