Leaderboard: Are you sick of MMORPG quests?

When World of Warcraft was in beta and I first gave it a go, I remember being absolutely captivated by questing. It wasn’t as if no MMORPGs before hadn’t included quests. Most of them had, in some way or another, be they Ultima Online’s escort quests, EverQuest’s epics, or Star Wars Galaxies’ missions. The thing that made all the games prior to Blizzard’s 2004 spectacle so different was that questing wasn’t the primary thing to do to advance your character to the cap — it wasn’t the core gameplay element at all. So those of us who were tired of grinding out mobs to level up welcomed a different paradigm, not quite realizing that we were seeing a huge shift in the way MMORPGs were going to be designed from then on out in terms of what players were expected to do — and what we would no longer be able to do at all.

Fast-forward to today: Now when an MMORPG is announced and looks to be primarily quest-driven, at least to the cap, players moan and groan about boring and tedious quest grinds. Just another themepark, people say. I’d rather log out than do one more pointless quest.

Are you also sick of MMORPG questing?

Are you tired of MMORPG questing?

  • Yep, I'm so over MMORPG questing and really want something else instead. (19%, 87 Votes)
  • I'm tired of some questing in some MMOs, but not in all MMOs. (16%, 77 Votes)
  • I'm tired of the currently available MMORPG questing, but I think questing as a concept still has potential. (33%, 155 Votes)
  • I'm only mildly tired of questing, but hey at least we're not grinding kobolds! (13%, 61 Votes)
  • Nope, I love quests, moar quests please, nothing could ever be better. (15%, 72 Votes)
  • Something else (tell us in the comments!) (2%, 10 Votes)
  • No opinion / just want to see the polls. (2%, 8 Votes)

Total Voters: 470

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82 Comments on "Leaderboard: Are you sick of MMORPG quests?"

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Apollymi

I like some questing. SWG missions are the best mix IMO. Do some grinding, grab a few missions. Stuff like that.

Crow
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Crow

When you dev a game based on your audience having a max attention span of 15 minutes… we need to talk about this?

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Truman Barney

I think the biggest problem with MMO’s these days is not the questing but the fact they simply are not challenging at all. I would say over 95% of all the content these days is completely solo-able to the point where you could close your eyes and press 1-9 and win (even though sadly you usually don’t even have that many skills anymore to fill 1-9)

I’m banking on Pantheon to scratch that itch for me I just want a modern yet old school MMO that forces socialization with crafting, challenging content and bringing back the trinity class system. Hopefully they stay humble and don’t get too ambitious so they can cater to the niche and still maintain a healthy income for their staff.

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Ken from Chicago

I like main quests that tell epic stories within an mmo and side quests that flesh out details of the world. Quests can also be fun tutorials of how the mmo’s work in general and how a particular mmo works in specific.

That was one of the nice things about Guild Wars original recipe, the low level 20 max level meant the questing was more about telling a story and exploring the world, not merely for leveling up. Prophecies and subsequent editions were well-designed so learned about how to play the game from levels 1-10 and then went from the starter zone (Pre-Searing in Prophecies) and went into the wider world from levels 11-20 at which point you arrived at Lion’s Arch or the port city that let you travel to another continent.

Yes, it would be nice to do stuff in addition to just questing: crafting, exploring, resource collecting, trading, defending a realm, and even “(bounty) hunting” for those with that particular bent. Guild Wars 2 idea of going into an area and discovering things to do, are Star Citizen’s plan of the economy generating missions (a planet needs food so will pay players to import food or if not enough players do so, then NPCs will do so, meaning pirates might prey on them, and if the pirates are successful enough, NPCs will offer jobs to escort trade ships and/or put out bounties on pirates, etc.) which I think is akin to a more blend of sandbox / theme park, “sandpark” style of play that might be interesting.

Does Eve Online have “quests”? Isn’t it all sandbox? Also Arche Age? I wouldn’t mind trying out sandboxes if you could shut off PVP so they aren’t just gankfests (which is what they have a bad reputation for being).

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Wolfyseyes

The idea of a quest as an epic undertaking has to be brought back to the fore instead of a honey-do list of limited slaughter. Leave that for the mercenary notice board if players want to pick those up for extra credits or reputation.

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Zen Dadaist

Inevitable “no elf butts option” complaint here.

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Godson69

A lot of this has to do with the player… are you playing the game or are you playing your character.

Some players don’t care about the story or lore, others do. Well written quest that give lore and background to players can make a game feel rich and immersive. To some players those same quests are just walls of text with meaningless garbage, all they want to know is what the objective is.

I’ve been both, even though a lot of it has to do with how well written the dialogue is. It can be easy to see in some games if a quest was just some kind of filler or if the devs spent time figuring out how they wanted a quest to fit into the overall story.

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Veldan

True. I’ve had great fun in some MMOs reading all the quests, but I’ve also seen plenty with only “filler” text, where the devs clearly wanted people to rush and didn’t bother with a good dialogue or story.

cambruin
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cambruin

Having played LotRO for 10+ years I got tired of what I consider the ‘current generation’ of quest design. I used to love going to hubs, pick up a dozen quests, complete them all -even if 9 out of 10 were lazy design ‘fetch’ quests- and port back to receive massive xp.

Ever since Cataclysm however, games seemed to follow suit; get 1-2 quests at point A, complete them so you can be sent to point B, where you get 2-3 new ones, which you have to complete before opening up point C, … You were on a beaten path, an extremely linear form of questing removing all sense of exploration, restricting you in so many ways -don’t like this quest? Sh*t outa luck, you’ll complete it or you’ll not open up the next ‘point of interest’-.
LotRO had the good old-fashioned quest hub mechanic ’till lvl 65 or so, once you hit… whatever it’s called it’s the same lazy linear questing. Rift? Taking things a little further even. WoW? I feel like they started this nonsense. SWtOR? Same old story. Wildstar? Oh boy. Linear² with a bad game built around it.

The only game to actually grant me the freedom I like -or should that be crave?-, from character design to skill setups, from crafting to questing; ESO. Quests are ‘out there’. You stick to the beaten path? No problem, you’ll get there, but you’ll miss a lot of quests hidden left and right.
With the exception of LotRO and WoW, I never played the same MMO for 2-3 months. ESO? I’ve been playing for over a year, still very much in love with it. I haven’t even considered going back to my true love LotRO anymore.

So no, when done ‘right’, I love them. When done… well, the way most MMOs do them? No, it’s a very good reason for me to not even finish the free month.

kjempff
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kjempff

That is the wrong question to ask.
It is not quests as a concept that people are sick of, it is the way mmos use them to push story content on to players, aka on rails themepark story driven. WoW invented this kind of mmorpg (earlier mmorpgs suc as everquest were not story driven), and every mmo since have just followed this concept (even sandboxish mmos).
So yeah the question should not be for or against quests, but if you like to be spoonfed content as quests or would rather want open ended questing where the player has freedom to choose their content and thereby create their own stories (how everquest worked fyi).

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rafael12104

So, quests, the very word is getting a bad wrap. The problem isn’t that there are quests required to progress or that leveling is a part of that. The problem is that quests aren’t really quests. There is little skill, and often tedium in these tasks that amount to nothing more than a time suck.

The innovation in questing is not in removing them or finding new ways to level. The innovation is in making them compelling and worthwhile to such an extent that they are part of the larger narrative and not a to do list.

Easy to say, but hard to do? Yeah, sure. But there are games that do correctly out there right that now.

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Teala Te'Jir

Use to have a love/hate relationship with quest in MMORPG’s. WoW was the first one that really made me learn to hate the go fetch me [x]# of these or go kill [x] # of these, and don’t get me started on their lame escort quest with horrible pathing abilities. All the bad quest that are in most MMO’s are just poorly done with a lazy level designers that refuse to use their imaginations. Which MMORPG has decent quest if not fun ones? I have to say ESO(Elder Scrolls Online) is really one of the only MMORPG’s that has gotten away from go fetch me 10 of these or kill 10 of those. In fact I cannot recall ever doing one of these in ESO yet.

As for their escort quest in ESO – the person/s your escorting are better scripted than anything I ever encountered in WoW – by a huge margin! I can actually get on my horse and race to the location I am escorting the NPC to and it’s amazing there they are walking up to where we were going. To bad WoW’s escort quest are poorly done. On top of that the NPC’s your escorting actually move like they have a purpose! In one quest I was escorting a pair of Wood Elves when the one piped up and told me to stop dilly dallying around and pick up the pace! How cool is that?!

If you want to see good questing done right – try ESO, many of its quest have great stories and lore attached to them and some are half a dozen chapters(have multiple steps) or more in length.

One last thing – there are no real quest hubs in ESO – because quest can be found all over the place, scattered around. Seriously, it’s like playing Skyrim in that sense because you’ll be walking along on a nice warm day and suddenly you’re saving a kingdom. :)

So am I tired of quest in MMORPG’s – not as long as they are done like the ones in ESO! In fact I want the developers to put more in the game and so do most of the people playing it. Recently asked this very question on Reddit and got an overwhelming response of “hell yes”!

kjempff
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kjempff

Teala been missing your awesome wickedly cool blog.
I am not sure I can agree with your ESO example though, I have rarely felt more on the quest rails than in ESO, feeling boxed and fed quest stories.. and they were most of them of the type “X number of”.

cambruin
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cambruin

With the exception of the main story, I don’t quite see how we could ever be seen as ‘on rails’. You can basically skip any and every quest. You can run halfway through the map to pick up that one quest you really love and do so. No lvl requirements, no reputation requirements, no prereqs whatsoever.

I’d like to know what zone you have in mind, so I can avoid it, since I absolutely loathe on-rails questing.

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Giles Linnear

If the alternative is survival sandboxes, well, I recently bought into Conan Exiles, ARK: Survival Evolved and No Man’s Sky, and after playing 10-12 hours in each of them, find myself logging right back in to Elder Scrolls Online for more conversation with NPCs.

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Rottenrotny

Conan Exiles was pretty cool at first, but I too wish there were some quests and NPCs. I need something to do other than Farm, Build, PVP and Grind.

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Jokerchyld

As an avid MMO player I’d have to say Elder Scrolls Online is the best MMORPG for old school PvE players right now. Not that its in the best form, but that its team is dedicated to getting it there, with actual gameplay affected improvements with each update. Honestly impressed.

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Jokerchyld

Mmmm I’m not sick of questing, I’m sick of the existing quest model. Even under great drama or lore its skeleton still breaks down to “go do this for that”. I just feel that over time there has to be a more immersive way to do that. To me quests need to evoke a feeling (as best you can) and need to be moderate.

I mean I can’t remember the last time I had a truly epic quest that took me across different lands to reach that next achievement. Letting me figure out if I can do it by myself or if I need help.
Not some invisible barrier or limitation. THAT is something I would do for this.

I sit here as I play Zelda Breath of the Wild and I had to pause and say “Wow, Nintendo does what MMOs don’t” (couldn’t resist). Seriously though Nintendo achieved a level of immersion and truly dynamic gameplay that I wouldnt be the least bit surprised if a smart developer emulated that as an MMO system.

dixa
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dixa

Um what’s the alternative? grinding a-la 1999? nobody else has come up with a working, different way to advance your character other than questing. Questing is nothing more than directed grinding.

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Zen Dadaist

Well I have to hand it to Rift – Instant Adventures are a pretty nice way of making quesitng and grinding meet in a dynamic kind of way. Sure they get old after a while too but the way it switches up and changes the zones helps to add some variety.

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Veldan

Grinding still works though. Look at RuneScape, it’s more active than ever. I’m not sure about total player numbers, but you can find trackers online that indicate peak concurrency over 100k. And the main progression in RS is to simply grind. There’s no fundamental reason why that’s a bad thing, other than people’s negative association with the word “grind”. Even that might not be a valid reason, because for many “questing” has an equally negative meaning.

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Kathy Davis

I love quest, go fetch this, go kill that and all that jazz. I find these type of quest relaxing.
I Know, I know, I wonder about me too…..

styopa
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styopa

I think the operative question isn’t “are you sick of questing?” but “what can you realistically replace questing with?”

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thalendor

I’m not sick of quests so much as I am sick of certain ways of implementing them, with two specific things in particular.

The first thing I’m sick of, which unfortunately for me has quite become common in MMO’s recently, is a sort of “main story” quest that leads you around by the nose from zone to zone. Though as long as it’s not mandatory, or nearly so, the presence of such a quest line doesn’t bother me so much. As a decent example, pre-GW2’s main story was entirely ignorable in that I didn’t feel particularly penalized for not doing it (I didn’t complete it a single time until a couple weeks before HoT) so I felt free to explore the zones as I saw fit, given that there were multiple level appropriate zones available at every level (and that’s not taking into account level scaling) and that made pre-HoT GW2 a much more enjoyable experience for me than being told where to go and when.

The next thing, which fortunately there seems to be some movement away from, are the mindnumbing same dozen or so daily quests, day after day. With things like GW2’s events and Legion’s world quests, I’m hoping to never run into that sort of daily questing pattern ever again. Just having such a variety of things to do, and different things available at different times, is an improvement, IMO, even if what you’re asked to do is usually just as trite as traditional dailies.

Line
Reader
Line

If you consider quests to be a mean to an end, and that is levelling up, then yes, it’s quite bad.
Grinding mobs is significantly worse, and it would be crazy to go for that in this day and age (not that crappy “sandparks” don’t do it, and we’ve seen how well it goes).

But quests are not a bad thing at all.
Having a quest for your character is a great thing; of course if it’s save the world from evil by showing me your strength killing wolves it’s kinda stupid.
They just need to be engaging, decently long and not a coat of paint on monster killing/looting. Plenty of games do that fairly well, but the catch is that even in quest focused MMOs it’s only aspect of the questing, bogged down by countless others along awful elements to pad out the main quest (attunements anyone?).

So, no I’m not sick of MMO quests.
I just want them to be a relevant and engaging part of the game, without extremely tedious time/luck requirements… and I don’t want to slough through thousands of bog standard kill and fetch quests only to reach an endgame that just ignores them entirely.

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Veldan

I don’t find grinding mobs worse at all. The same for gathering / harvesting. I actually much prefer having the freedom of doing it where I want, for as long as I want, over having to go where the quest sends me and do the required amount.

It’s one of the reasons I quit BDO. I would likely have quit anyway because of the graphics popping, but I got really sick of having to move to town every 3 minutes to hand in another bunch of logs or processed wood. It would have been much more fun to stay out in the land for, say, 30 mins, and actually get some proper harvesting done.

Implementing quests for the sake of it is a very bad idea imo. Grind, or I’d rather call it “Freedom”, is preferable.

Line
Reader
Line

My problem with that mob grind, is why do you have to do it?
If it was for some specifics or something… sure, why not. It still exists in modern MMOs.

But in the case of BDO, and pretty much everything before… you don’t have freedom. You go to those grind spots, and you grind because you need to.
And don’t forget to make friends with the people owing the spots, else you won’t even be able to progress.

That’s plain worse than quests, because MMOs were made to waste your time not even looking at the screen, instead focusing on requiring contant play time in the bext XP/gold per hour spot. There was no gameplay, no lore, nothing. Just grind and give me your money. Oh, and chat with players, because you have time to do that when you only autoattack.

camren_rooke
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camren_rooke

Tera’s quests are awful.

Literally, NPC1 tells you to talk to NPC2 who is standing right next to them. There are also a few escort quests but it is otherwise, go talk to X, deliver X, or kill X number of woozles.

Ugh.

It is soul destroying.

It doesn’t help the main quest is awful too.

dixa
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dixa

have you done the pre-heavensward quests in ffxiv? they are a LOT worse. i swear 80% of them are walking back from npc1 to npc2 and watching a cut scene. that’s it.

django857
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django857

The only quest i’m sick of are the kill x amount kind of quest. Its not bad if they keep it under 5 mobs but the 15 and up range is stupid.

quark1020
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quark1020

Nah, I’ll take that over having to collect hooves from zebras that, for some reason, have 4 legs but have no hooves.

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Bryan Gregory

Dear Lord Jesus YES I am extremely sick of these completely uncreative “quests.” Although to be honest I’m pretty sick of post-WoW MMOs in general. They can hardly be called MMOs anymore. Solo questing to max level and maybe grouping for the dungeons on the way (if it’s worth it, it’s sometimes not) is a design I do not care for. You may even experience some group related quests along the way, but they seem to be rare or not worth the time. Not to mention, you decide to do the dungeon after all, and the last boss ACTUALLY drops your new weapon. Then a bit later you do a kill 10 pigs quests and get a better weapon. Wut.

I really hated in WoW back in the day when you’d go to a new camp and get upwards of 15-20 quests all at once. I didn’t mind questing in FFXIV as much because when you went to a new camp you would only have 2-3 quests at a time.

So what’s the solution? I certainly don’t like having my quest log full of quests, especially when there’s an oh-so-easy to reach limit to the amount of quests you can have active at one time. So I think less quests definitely helps. BDO was another game I didn’t mind questing in – the first thing I did was grind to level 56, and THEN I went back and did all the quests. But quests in BDO don’t give you combat experience, they advance your character in a different way with contribution points and energy. That’s another thing that could make quest grinds more interesting.

Personally I’ve always wanted to see what the quest grind would be like in a game like old school EQ or FFXI where leveling solo is mostly not an option.

But then we’re still running into one of the quest grind’s biggest problems – too much reward for too little effort. No, I don’t think every quest needs to be like EQ’s epic quests. But I also think it’s insulting for there to be hundreds and even thousands of these simple minded no thought brainless zombie mode quests.

As time goes on, I find myself spending more time playing games like FFXI and EQ, because some how, some way, grinding the same mobs over and over with a group of people is more fun to me than solo quest grinding.

camren_rooke
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camren_rooke

Honestly I’d like to see a quest you decide upon at character creation. One that takes a while to do. You know, a REAL quest.

1. You seek the demon who slew your father.
2. You wish to join the Emerald Regents, paladins who only accept a select few.
3. You wish to forge the Ugrajesh, a weapon of power revered by your people.
4. You wish to uncover the secrets of eternal life.
5. You want to become king of the bandits and a terror to all the surrounding lands.
6. You want to find out what this odd half-lidded eye trinket is. You have had it since birth.
7. You want to form an adventuring band and explore the ruins of the Black Citadel which sits outside your city.
8. You want to settle in the wilds and carve out a small piece of the land for you and your promising family.
9. You have been cursed and you want to know how to be free of it.
10. Your temple is failing and you want to bring new glory to it.

There’s ten in like two minutes that could lead a character through level one all the way to max level.

And write the quests with failing forward as an option. You try out for the Emerald Regents but fail. Is your quest over? Nope. You might have a chance to redeem yourself OR you might decide to join a mercenary band instead who actually run up against the Regents.

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Dreema

I’ve played WoW since the end of vanilla and honestly can’t remember a single instance where I’ve been able to pick up 15-20 quests in one place. Exaggerating much?

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Bryan Gregory

Uh this was the case all through TBC and WOTLK… Maybe you just never counted?

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Dreema

I certainly have counted and I’ve played TBC and Wrath on private servers recently and it definitely isn’t the case. 5-6 quests at a time, sure, but 15-20? Hardly.

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Bryan Correll

I’d rather log out than do one more pointless quest.

I can agree with that, pointless being the key word. You want me to bring you five frog livers? No thanks, get your own damn frog livers. Need me to enter a nightmare dreamscape as part of an effort to find out what happened to Tyler Freeborn? That I’m up for.

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thickenergy

Could you bring back five nightmare frog livers while you’re there? That’d be great.

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Oleg Chebeneev

Quests are the core of any theme park MMORPG. But many developers dont understand that quests evolved quite abit since vanilla WoW times. Look at Wildstar, RIFT, LoTRO, FF14. Their quests are tedious and outdated. Now look at WoW: Legion. Thats how you should do quests in modern MMOs.
In other words, Im not tired of quests. Im tired of archaic quests that just pop a window with description and thats it.

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Manastu Utakata

Moar quests puleez and /Elf butts! <3

purplecopper
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purplecopper

Theoretically ANYTHING can be a quest.

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Melissa McDonald

Maybe what we are really tired of is quest trackers/helpers/arrows. Back when NPCs would just sort of say “Yeah, away yonder lies (something). Bring some back if you can.” And you would have to literally explore half a zone looking for what you were only fuzzily pointed-towards by the NPC.
Now THAT was questing. I remember LOTRO before the quest helper arrow. I guess nobody wants to take that kind of time in a game anymore.

dixa
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dixa

i’m sorry but the average western worker puts in more hours per week now than they did in 2004. ain’t nobody got time for figuring out vague location clues.

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Robert Mann

It isn’t really the trackers/helpers/arrows alone that is the problem. It’s the entire design of the game pushing speed above anything and everything else, with combat to get to max level and gear up as the only real content that sees any care.

As others noted, given the current design you will just see what came before that… spoilers online for it all.

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Mick the Barbarian

Quest trackers would quickly be replaced (again) by internet browsers, maps and “spoilers”. The quest trackers are the “official” response.

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Schmidt.Capela

Nobody needed to take that kind of time back then either, at least for the games with a larger player base; with WoW, for example, there were comprehensive quest guides since early Vanilla at least.

The true loss with quest trackers/helpers/arrows is that many devs got lazy to the point they don’t supply other ways of figuring what to do; the player either blindly follows the arrow or else must stumble on what he is supposed to do by chance. Before quest helpers became integrated into the game devs always made sure you could figure out what you had to do and where you had to go from just the quest text.

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Pandalulz

I don’t really mind the quest trackers. It would be like my wife telling me to drop my daughter off at her friend’s house, and then refusing to give me the address, to just drive up and down the road until I accidentally found it. The problem is that what’s at the end of the quest tracker isn’t meaningful in any kind of way.
So I’m just now playing Destiny, you know, now that it’s pretty much in maintenance mode, and what I love is that every single mission is a fully scripted, instanced event. I’ll see people on the landscape on the way to the instance, just rolling their patrols, but then it seamlessly drops me into my own area so I can get immersed in the story. The storytelling is refreshing because they focus so hard on it.

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Robert Mann

The point was that there are other and better ways of indicating where to go (addresses, for example, being a good idea.)

camren_rooke
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camren_rooke

Agreed.

Your character wants to know how to find the ruins of the Black Citadel.
You could ask around the bar and find a grizzled veteran who says he saw a black spire once. Was lost in Emberflare Marsh and had climbed a giant black oak to try to find his way out. When he looked east he saw a black tower way to the west, the sun just setting behind it.

You could ask the mages for access to their library. Once there you find mention of the last adventuring group who came back in a tattered journal. In it it mentions the group set our north from Gillemore and came upon a massive black stone wall three days from town. They had been beset by trolls and were too beat up to explore further.

You could talk to the priests of Undine, goddess of the sea and mysteries. They will perform a divination for you…for a price.

None of these require a quest marker but would give someone willing to sit and read for a few moments a notice for where they might need to go.

Or IF the player searches out all three methods, they can get a general area on their map for where they might want to look.

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Pandalulz

Ok, I’ll admit, if they put that much work into it, I would get behind that sort of thing.

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Pandalulz

I don’t know about you, but I use an address to put a point on a map that I navigate to, just like a quest tracker does.
Destiny also leads you by the nose to where you need to go, but it still manages to make it interesting along the way.

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Robert Mann

Well then, if we are going with relevant technology for a fantasy MMO, I guess you are going to need a lot of maps to mark up! I mean, the tracking options do kinda make sense, even the glowing line on the ground stuff, in sci-fi themed games. They just don’t really in those with lower tech in the game world.

Of course, some people do like the convenience… which is fine. It’s just not needed (actually, is annoying that it exists) in every game. Mixing options for different players makes the games more fun for all those players, and leaves us with more interest in the games we actually enjoy the mechanics of (in turn helping those developers!)

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MesaSage

I’m not sick of quests, but I do prefer they actually be imaginative and challenging. EQ II does a better job in the landscape than Lotro, but there’s still a lot of back and forth and kill 10. What I despise is quests that are structured entirely to get you to buy a convenience item, like fast travel to the destination, (which happens to be very far away) – and then back again.

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ogged451

Somewhat tired. Now that TSW is functionally dead, I’m playing FF14 and the quests there are so shallow.

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Wanda Clamshuckr

I gave FFXIV a 2nd go this winter and left for the same reason. I spent most of my time travelling long distances to say a one liner to someone, then run back the same distance to do it again. And again, and again. Toss in the generic kill X of this (again and again) to spice it up, and I was done.

I went back to ESO. At least there, quest dialogue is clever and engaging. I actually want to read how the story progresses, for their originality and (often) bitter little twists.

I’m over the quest design from 2004 that some studios seem to copy/paste. I’m embracing the next gen version created by writers, that draw me into the world, rather than smothering me with boredom laced with the desire to clickclickclick to simply get it over with.

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kidwithknife

Nope. I like questing. Obviously sucky quests aren’t much fun, but then the problem isn’t questing, the problem is that the quests you’re playing suck. I generally don’t play games where I think the quests overall suck.

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

quests just go hand in hand with the overly dictatorial control freak behaviour of mmo devs.

they want you to play the game how they want you to play it and no other way. and if you don’t like it they’ll ban you and nerf the fun thing you found to do just in case someone else tries it.

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Veldan

Questing can still be great, it all depends on how and where it’s used. Even a “kill 10 of x” quest can be awesome if it asks you to kill something difficult and has an appropriate reward for the challenge. Sadly, words like “difficult” and “challenge” seem to not be present in the vocabulary of today’s open world content designers…

Reader
Giannis Papadopoulos

MMO quests lost their magic by trying to be convenient…

The MMO worlds also lost their magic for the same reason.. convenience.

I cant decide if quests are boring or the game worlds are boring… 1 shot mobs, fast travels, no real nights were mobs become stronger, no weather effects that impact gameplay…

In current game worlds, everything is boring, not just questing

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Robert Mann

The answer is both. Quests are boring as designed. Game worlds are boring as designed. Well, outside the occasional bit of mindless fun that is equally well served by any game with some button mashing of combat.

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Arktouros

I can “deal with” quests in their current state, but if they’re the primary character advancement I find it pretty hard to stand going through them multiple times these days.

The root issue, though, is not that quests are bad but rather that the MMO industry seems to feel the ONLY other alternative is grinding. Quest or Grind, that’s your two options of character advancement and it’s been that way for the last 20!!! years. GW2 came close to shaking that up but otherwise there’s just no innovation these days.

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Schlag Sweetleaf

!

groundhog's  day questing.jpg
camren_rooke
Reader
camren_rooke

I see yur lil exclamation point link.

:P

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Schlag Sweetleaf

your quest, should you choose to accept it…;p

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Robert Mann

This groundhog will self destruct in 15 seconds?

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Robert Mann

Phil says “Help, I’ve been kidnapped by this crazy dude… again! Get me out of this mess!”

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TheDonDude

For theme park games, questing is the very best way to deliver plot. Can’t see why we’d want it gone.

Not to say questing can’t be improved, though.

Reader
Rottenrotny

So you’d rather grind?
Dungeons? (See: Grind)
PVP?
What else is there?

Sure it can get monotonous after playing MMOs for a decade+, it kinda feels like I’ve been doing the same -Kill 10 mobs and bring me their hearts, oh but they actually all don’t have hearts so you’ll prob need to kill 20ish- but quests in one form or another are integral to video games and RPGs in general.

Sandboxes can be fun… for a while, but every time I play one that has no quests I always wish there were.

Reader
Robert Mann

No levels. Levels but with advancement via skill uses ala ES single player games. Levels based off combat, but with a ton of other relevant stuff to do, and combat not being the sole and only focus of development. ETC.

There’s a ton of possibilities, not just the time based systems others are talking about in response.

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Giannis Papadopoulos

What about have no levels at all? What about you can access all the world from the start and progress your character in a different way?

Take age of wushu for example… it was similar to EVE, you put some skill on que to learn them and it just takes time.. in the meanwhile you can accelerate the skill learning (hopefully not by cash shop but from in game acticity).

Not saying this is the best system, but we need to think out of the box. By removing quests does not mean that everything else will remain the same..

Reader
Greaterdivinity

I’m lucky in that I’m finding great joy in doing what, in most RPG’s (MMO or not), is considered “busywork”. All that “Go Kill X mobs” or “Go collect poop!” side-missions? Enjoying the hell outta them.

They don’t require much thought, most games make completing them feel relatively rewarding, and it’s something that’s easy to monitor progress on and work towards completing in checklist form. Just ticking each box off as you complete the busywork quests until it’s all done and you have that sense of accomplishment, and then moving on.

It’s like, my own personal little meditation. Put on something on Netflix or some music, bring myself to a slightly less than sober state, and let the relaxing in-game grinding begin.

camren_rooke
Reader
camren_rooke

quest
/kwest/

noun noun: quest, plural noun: quests

1. a long or arduous search for something: “the quest for a reliable vaccine has intensified” synonyms: search, hunt
▪ (in medieval romance) an expedition made by a knight to accomplish a prescribed task. synonyms: expedition, journey, voyage, trek, travels,

Delivering a pig to the guy thirty feet away is not a quest. This is busywork.
Delivering it to a neighbor across town is not a quest. This is a job.
If delivering the pig to another kingdom involves fighting through hordes of bacon loving troglodytes, wading through a swamp, and eventually solving the puzzle which free the kingdom from the magical stasis it has been ensorcelled in, then yes, it may indeed be a quest.

capt_north
Reader
capt_north

I don’t mind quests, but I hate repeating quests, even on a different character. It just reinforces that the story is on rails and you can’t really change it… just advance it or not advance it or maybe take a different path to the same end. Sometimes it just feels like I’m watching a movie and I’m pressing an inordinate number of buttons to get to the next scene.

It’s a perfectly valid way of telling a story, but if I want to watch somebody else’s stories, I have an array of media choices to do that. In my virtual world games, I’d like to be able to tell my story, and have it be different than any other player’s story.

Reader
McGuffn

Perhaps quests should be account based. You do them once and you get the XP for all characters.

Reader
Daniel Miller

No, but the MMO games have not developed. A few games have done it right and so few mmos have done similar.

Some games quest are needed to help you get through the world, and auto lvling mobs to your level, while cool, makes gear progression useless. But back on point. FFXIV did a great job on gathering crafts. They put resources all over the world and made gathering more then just press one button.

On the other hand no MMO has done like FFXI, blue mage job. Either straight up blue mage type job. Explore the world, learn spells, and make them like skill decks like Bless online. Or something else, but similar way to explore the world. .

Or make it like Atelier, for crafting and magic users. You kill mobs to gain resources and knowledge to make the weapons, armor, food, potions and so on. Do not gather things n open world. Both would be a fresh breath and fun.

I really wish a mmo would tap into the blue mage concept. Or make mage more interesting. Again ffxi scholar was far more then a mage casting a fireball, twisting, turning magic, and meleeing a staff. Why is it every game my mage stands still to cast? Evolve damm it!

Reader
Loopy

I like clever quests. I like quests that promote a good storyline, with multiple phases and an actual meaningful progression. Quests that ask to kill x number of rats or have you run around the world without purpose can die out.

Reader
Nordavind

Something else.

Quests have their place in the games I enjoy. I mean, don’t make quests for the sake of quest. Make meaningful quests. Make quest that drive the game world forward. Make quests that tell a story. Make quests that bring the community together. Or that drives a wedge between them. Make quests with choices. Make quests for the brain as well as the arm.

Don’t litter the world with fetch and deliver and hunt/gather quests. Also, quests do not need to be the main/only way to move forward, but they should be one way to accomplish this if people want it.

I am Nord, and I am Pro Quests. (Good quests).

Reader
Melissa McDonald

Well, you have to take some of them as more of a why. I’m tired of “kill 10x” quests. I’m tired of “go see mom. go see dad. go back to mom. go back to dad” quests. But games have these for a reason.

I realize that one helps you hone your fighting skills, so early on, cool.

I realize the 2nd example is a way of tricking you into exploring more of the map and revealing the next big quest hub. I just don’t like when they send me back again.

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