Tencent will host a cloud version of Blade & Soul in China soon

    
3
Tencent will host a cloud version of Blade & Soul in China soon

It’s possible that the hacking cough that was Google Stadia’s launch has turned you off from the notion that cloud gaming is the future, but Tencent still believes in it. It believes in it so thoroughly that it’s planning to launch a cloud version of Blade & Soul sometime in the near future. The game is doing well in China, so it makes sense to launch a cloud version of the game in China, allowing players with lower-end machines or away from their main computers to still experience the game.

Unlike the aforementioned wheezing rattle of a launch, Tencent’s announced plans require a high-speed broadband service and low latency to make use of the cloud service, as well as only launching in six cities. Hebei, Anhui, Tianjing, Beijing, Jiangsu, and Shanghai will have access to the cloud version of the game, but other major cities including Shenzhen (the headquarters of Tencent) will not be getting in on the cloud-based goodness for the moment. So cloud gaming is indeed the future… if you’re in the right parts of the country, and you have good Internet, and you want the future to include Blade & Soul.

Source: MMO Culture

No posts to display

newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Rodrigo Dias Costa

It’s possible that the hacking cough that was Google Stadia’s launch has turned you off from the notion that cloud gaming is the future, but Tencent still believes in it.

To be fair, even the Switch has some streaming-only games that worked. The problem is those games are Japan-only, which ensure some kind of quality on the network’s infrastucture side. That’s probably what Tencent is targeting, and is actually a good idea.

Mewmew
Reader
Mewmew

“It’s possible that the hacking cough that was Google Stadia’s launch has turned you off from the notion that cloud gaming is the future, but Tencent still believes in it.”

A lot of companies and people still think it’s the future of gaming, and maybe it is. It’s just that we’re not really ready for it now, overall.

Reader
rafael12104

Hmm. Putting aside my BnS bias, it seems to me that Tencent is doing it right. They are making sure that the infrastructure is there to support the service instead of issuing blanket statements, like Stadia, that it will work as advertised.

And of course being a Chinese company, they can manage government concerns as well as ensure the effort is positioned to succeed.

BnS, while well chosen with the new UE4 servers that will up at the end of this month, is a test run with many more games to follow IF it succeeds.

And this really brings into relief the obvious question for Google. Why the rush for global launch of a system that never demonstrated that, in its current form, it would deliver? Why not stage the roll out to better manage the service and deliver the service promised?

First to market doesn’t mean shit if the tech isn’t in place, customers don’t have the means, and software isn’t proven.