The Game Archaeologist: Anarchy Online, from launch to now

    
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July 27th 2001. On this date, Funcom pulled the trigger on Anarchy Online, launching it in North America with a planned release in Europe a couple of months later.

Don’t miss last week’s entry in this column when we covered Anarchy Online’s pre-launch development!
Almost instantly, the game and its support infrastructure buckled and broke under the demand of the 35,000 or so subscribers who ponied up money for this experience. Unfortuantely, players couldn’t make accounts, log in, or experience anything but a stuttering slide show. This wasn’t simply a Day One or Week One problem, either, as these issues persisted for months afterward.

Anarchy Online lived up to its name as an unreliable product that squandered a lot of initial goodwill by not being ready for release. Funcom begged game review sites to hold off on posting judgments, while sending out a newsletter during that first week with promises of improvements: “There have been some significant issues that our customers have been dealing with the last few days. It has been difficult to log on due to massive traffic, and the game is unfortunately still unstable. We apologize for all the inconvenience this has caused our customers and we are working around the clock to make things right.”

Around the clock wasn’t enough; it took Funcom a half-year to get all of these critical issues hammered out to the point where most anyone who wanted to could log in and play. During this time period, the MMO was slammed with bad reviews and word-of-mouth — but not enough to kill it entirely. Dedicated players stuck it out, and gradually the title started to function as intended.

For the game itself, Anarchy Online sent players to the far-flung future of 29,475 AD, where they became the latest adventurers to arrive at Rubi-Ka. They chose from an array of classes — such as Agent or Bureaucrat — and then set to completing tasks for the major factions of the game: Omni-Tek, the Clan, the Neturals, the Redeemed, and the Unredeemed.

If there wasn’t enough to do, players could always whip up their own generated quests with Anarchy Online’s patented dynamic missions. Basically, this system allowed players to whip up a randomized pocket dungeon to run for experience and other rewards.

There were plenty of other innovative features, such as apartments (customizable player housing) and a soundtrack that would shift and change depending on what was happening to the player at the time. Players also fell in love with Anarchy Online’s unofficial mascot: the leet, a little critter who spoke in “1337 speak.”

Funcom prided itself on putting out a game with graphics that looked far better than the super-chunky EverQuest or Dark Age of Camelot. Anarchy Online’s team felt that its characters had better dimensions and looked like proper people.

Its second year of operation went better, especially as Funcom released a “booster” — a content update — called Notum Wars that introduced territory control PvP to the game’s landscape. Funcom’s poor sales of Anarchy Online during 2001 started climbing up, with a subscriber count of 150,000 being announced during that time.

The entirety of Anarchy Online’s expansions happened thereafter from 2003 through 2006, as Shadowlands, Alien Invasion, and Lost Eden brought to the table more lands (such as Shadowlands‘ seven zones), two new classes (Shadowlands‘ Keeper and Shade), more systems (guild housing, alien XP), and vehicles that players could fly and drive. These were truly the glory years of Anarchy Online, with a peak subscription count rising to 700,000 shortly by late 2004. The last big content release came several years later in 2009 in the form of an endgame booster called Legacy of the Xan.

While we think of titles like Dungeons and Dragons Online and Runes of Magic bringing the free-to-play business model to MMORPGs, the truth is that older games such as RuneScape and Anarchy Online did it first. In 2004, Funcom announced a F2P option that would allow players to experience the game if they were willing to see virtual billboards (advertising real-world products) all over their game landscape. This proved successful, pulling in 400,000 additional players in the first half-year of operation.

By 2008 and the game’s 7th anniversary, Anarchy Online had racked up a total of two million free and subscribed players who had jumped into Rubi-Ka. The MMO was critically acclaimed, too, netting over two dozen awards.

However, by this time, the MMORPG was starting to look a little long in the tooth, especially compared to Funcom’s newest MMO, Age of Conan. Talk began about transitioning Anarchy Online’s older graphics engine over to the studio’s proprietary Dreamworld tech, but it wouldn’t be until seven years later, in 2015, that this visual upgrade would go live to a mostly indifferent gaming public.

By its second decade, Anarchy Online was well into the “long tail” of its operation, with a reduced community of loyalists. Funcom eventually merged all of the servers down to a single shard by 2013, bringing its entire playerbase into the same world.

While Funcom stopped busting out expansion packs, the studio continued to tinker with Anarchy Online over the next decade. Anniversaries were celebrated with wild abandon, a progression server was introduced, and the title came out on Steam in 2017.

And so we reach today, where Anarchy Online is celebrating its 20th anniversary. Sure, the game isn’t breaking headlines or looking at any significant development, but it’s a victory in and of itself to still be operating long, long after everyone in the world thought it was going to crater due to a botched launch. Cheers, Rubi-Ka!

Believe it or not, MMOs did exist prior to World of Warcraft! Every two weeks, The Game Archaeologist looks back at classic online games and their history to learn a thing or two about where the industry came from… and where it might be heading.
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ogged451

Let me list up my disappointments with this article (this list will be incomplete and biased 😆)

1) Neutrals aren’t a “major” faction. According to rubi-ka.net, only 13.35% of all characters are neutral. So it’s down to Clan (good guys) and Omni-Tek (bad guys).
2) Neither are Redeemed and Unredeemed. Those are just Shadowlands reputation grinds because land control in the Shadowlands never became a thing. Also, next time Justin speaks to Ergo, it will be even more incoherent because he left out the Guardians of Shadows.
3) Funcom’s first attempt to re-do the graphics engine was using something called “Ogre”. Their Dreamworld attempt came later and this “new client” is still beta.
4) No mention of the heavy tool usage that came with AO .. Clicksaver (good), chat bots (good), multi-boxing (brrrr), buying ammo with click.exe …
5) No mention of Gridstream Productions (or that other radio station I keep forgetting) ?
6) ARK could also receive some praise.
7) that “progression server” came out in 2019. Placing it in the sentence before the Steam launch of 2017 is awkward.

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Brazen Bondar

AO was my first MMO. I didn’t jump in when it started but came in later as a f2p or FROOB as we were called. The Shadowlands expansion was controversial. Many players believed it split off the fan base and made the original cities deserted. But, I always saw players running around in my neck of Newland (Neutral territory), and never had trouble grouping or doing RP. AO is a great example of what Funcom used to be able to do when it cared about building MMOs. The worlds they could build and the stories they told were amazing and had depth. It’s unfortunate that the company now is only a shadow of what it was.

Damon Anderson
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Damon Anderson

Thanks, I enjoyed reading about AO. Although their ideas may not have always worked, or perhaps from what I read here the technology may not have been what was needed, Funcom has made unique MMO’S, despite whatever, I think they deserve credit for that.

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Oleg Chebeneev

Eh, I thought the series would be several parts longer. Still was fun read

Stefan
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Stefan

I guess that depends how familiar the author is with the game mind you that after Shadowlands, i believe World of Warcraft started to really pull players from other MMO’s as well as it introducing a lot of players to the genre.

I guess the expansions could be elaborated a whole lot more especially Shadowlands what introduced something as of a raid, symbiants to replace implants and how Shadowlands was received with mixed feelings as it made a lot of the core game elements obsolete to a point.

Also Alien invasion was a big big thing, from crafting gear that was great for all around and for all levels, unlike other MMOs the best gear here was mostly crafted and you could craft it for all levels, so you could do invasions in your organization (think guild) city, that had an upkeep and invasions also required a resource you got from somewhere else in the AI content. But you could do these invasions at lower levels and thus get lower level craftables and make the best gear ingame at lower levels.

I think that was the beauty of Anarchy Online, there was more than just max level min maxing, part of the fun was creating twinks, characters at lower levels i believe 60, 100 and 150 were the most popular ranges as those were max level ranges for certain dungeons. Think instead of maxing out a character to get top DPS which was also done on max level think creating a character you could solo a group dungeon with.

Stefan
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Stefan

Great article,

I guess that is the downside with graphics of that nature, they do not age well.

I do feel there is more there but the game gets a few minor updates now and then and it is rather dated both in User Interface as gameplay, only for the old crowd that do not mind spending ages.

They were indeed one of the first F2P mmo’s and so both Anarchy Online and Runescape were my first MMO’s as getting a credit card as a 14 year old 20 years ago was not that common.

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Bruno Brito

Isn’t AO pet system entirely based around macros/textcommands?

Stefan
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Stefan

Depends what you mean by it to be honest, if i remember correctly having spend most my time as an engineer. Is that there was a pet menu with the basic commands such as attack and follow, where you could also macro them and turn those macros into hotkeys. Which was something that was often needed as Pets tend to chase off or got stuck in terrain.

Now there were extra items, like trimmers https://aoitems.com/item/154940/trimmer—increase-aggressiveness/ But they were also very passive much like buffs but instead in the form of an item, i do not recall that pets had special abilities, there was the healing pet from MPs but that is about it.

So yes if you mean that, then most of it was text based but you turned it into hotkey functions through hotkeys.

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Bruno Brito

Yeah i mean it was text based because it was necessary to macro it. A relic of old times.

This game is conceptually great, don’t get me wrong. But it could use a remake in more user-friendly engines.

Stefan
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Stefan

Oh for certain, even when i started playing shortly after i was using a custom UI to replace the standard one. But to be honest if you played WoW and know of the hunter bug, you were also macroing every ability to pet attack in WoW and that is as recent as BFA, not sure if it got fixed for SL.

A lot of time and energy went into increasing the visuals, i believe that doing something for the user interface and quality of life changes would have done more.