Life Beyond’s economy gets a boost, plus its studio snags an Epic Mega Grant

    
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MOP’s Bree once argued that the economy was the central core of MMOs, the one element that truly bound an online game together and made it a virtual world instead of a combat simulator. If that is indeed the case, then Darewise’s upcoming Life Beyond (formerly Project C) is setting its priorities right by focusing on the construction of a free-market economy.

The studio announced this week that it is partnering with DMarket, an in-game item trading platform, to bring its tech and services into the sci-fi MMORPG.

“DMarket’s plug-and-play solution has helped Darewise build and balance such an economy in just three weeks, with the support of only two engineers from the game team,” the devs said. “Based on the free-market model, Life Beyond’s economy is literally driven by the community. Players are the ones to determine the value of the assets they craft or farm in the game. With a vast variety of craftable and purchasable items, Darewise and DMarket have laid the foundation for a robust and engaging economy to flourish.”

This tech is already live due to Patch 0.6.2, which also introduced user interface improvements and fixing a bug that keeps resetting key bindings.

The company also announced that it’s received funding from Epic Games.

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tiltowait

Free market model… So they are announcing they have no economic model at all?

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cykelbud

Instead of assuming and guessing why not get informed here?:
https://www.unrealengine.com/en-US/megagrants
In short: granted to open source projects or projects using UE4.

They have given 1 mill to Blender.org(3D model software) and 250.000 to Godot, another game engine.
Both open source projects.

laelgon
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laelgon

For the other games they do business in, it’s all cosmetic, but this seems to be suggesting you can buy functional in-game items from other players for real money. Am I missing something? Sounds like it’s going to be like Entropia Universe where it’s basically impossible to make progress without putting in real money.

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Armsbend

The term ‘grant’ usually infers that no form of payback is required. Why would a game developer be giving money to another competitor?

I assume that they are in fact not grants at all – but debt.

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Robert Mann

It’s something Epic started for P.R. with unreal engine. This was due to trying to draw more interest to the engine, as opposed to competitors, at the time. Sort of like a lottery variant of their tactics with their store.

I’m not really a fan of the tactics involved in either case.

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cursedseishi

I don’t know… Maybe because Epic is also first and foremost an Engine Developer, perhaps? And that a majority of their games have always served as fun demonstrations of said engine on top of being generally good games? Aside from Fortnite, the royalties they receive on top of the payments to use said engine are one of Epic’s greatest sources of income.

They’re developing an Unreal game. Any game developed on the Unreal Engine will have royalties associated with it. This is a Grant, because regardless they’d still be paying Epic for the rights to use their engine. This helps a game reach fruition? The developers just continue to pay their royalties as they would have to do anyways, and Epic gets said royalties and further the name of their engine while generating good will with it.

A debt implies the amount in full needs to be returned in some form. And that said debt would be owed whether the game succeeds or burns out before release. They won’t have to pay that debt back. This is NOT a debt.

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Armsbend

even though Unreal has been a mainstay for so long the black hole that is fortnite has the ability to cloud my fading memory.