Tamriel Infinium: Am I playing Elder Scrolls Online wrong?

Elder Scrolls Online and I have had an on-again-off-again relationship for the last several years. A lot of that relationship stemmed from my being steeped in another online community in another game, and the other part comes from the game just not being what I had hoped it would be. Despite my low-key participation in the community for the last couple of years, ESO‘s community has thrived, and the game itself has received a lot of praise after adding some much-needed features.

However, some of my friends, who have been playing consistently, are complaining that there isn’t anything left to do in the game. That doesn’t mean that they have done everything. I don’t see them walking around with the Dro-m’Athra skin or the Emperor title. However, I do understand what they mean: Anything else they can do in game would be boring or unachievable.

But I’m sitting here with only one high-level character and a bunch of alts around 25. I have plenty to do, and I’m still finding a lot of the game very interesting. I’m still finding intriguing niches in the community, not to mention that I still find stealing things from people and places a lot of fun despite having run through all of the Thieves Guild content twice now. (By the way, if anyone wants to run that again, let me know. It’s still my favorite content in game.)

With so many other people starting to get bored with the game and there are still number of things that I just haven’t done yet, I’ve begun to wonder if I’m just playing the game wrong.

My recent activity

Currently, I’m playing a Dunmer thief. I made her a Nightblade because I figured that the stealth skills would be very helpful (and so far they have been). I started the character in Ahab’s Landing, doing the Thieves Guild content first, bypassing all the Ebonheart Pact stuff. When I did start it, thanks to the One Tamriel update, I was actually able to start my Pact quests in Mournhold, bypassing all the Bleakrock and Stonefalls quests. I’m kind of glad that I did skip all that because the Ebonheart Pact questline, in general, is uninteresting to me, and with Morrowind around the corner, the Deshaan questline was much more appealing.

When you step into Mournhold, you are asked to immediately speak with the Dunmer god Almalexia. She asks you to investigate the Maulborn infestation. The Maulborn are Daedra worshipers who have been causing trouble in southern Morrowind. It’s no big spoiler to find out that there is an actual Daedric Prince behind the cult and the attack on Morrowind. I found this revelation particularly interesting because the Prince was Boethiah, the Daedra whom the Dunmer worshiped before turning their focus on the Tribunal.

Most of my time in game has been spent in the Daggerfall Covenant and the Aldemiri Dominion, so I had actually never played through that questline before. The last time I had actually touched the Ebonheart Pact was during beta. But currently, I’m doing a bit of backtracking and running through quests that seem interesting to me at the time. It tends to make leveling slow, but it’s super relaxing to just do whatever I want.

The day-to-day

From a daily perspective, I log in and run crafting writs. Those are super fast, and it helps me gather woodworking supplies, which is what I’ve decided my most recent character is going to be good at. From there, I do some thieving, which is the other thing my character is going to be good at. Then I look for quests that might be interesting or that I believe fit the character I want to play. Most of them revolve around Morrowind lore.

I don’t really have a guild. I mean, I’m in one, but it’s inactive. But that doesn’t exactly bother me because my interaction with other players is minimal. However, that overall concept is kind of strange to me because I’m kind of a social person in MMORPGs and soloing in MMOs always seemed weird to me in the first place. In fact, there was a time when I couldn’t understand playing an MMORPG solo at all. I had always thought, why not just play a single-player RPG? But I’ve come to find out that even passive interaction with people is still interaction, and in its own way, I enjoy it.

So what am I missing?

However, in having some discussions with my friends — remember the ones who are now bored with the game — I’ve begun to question how I’m playing the game. Am I playing it wrong? I feel there is so much that I’m missing because I’m not interacting with anyone on a direct and regular basis. I’ve not done a Trial because that requires a large group of coordinated people. I’ve done a few dungeons in PUGs and a couple with friends. Although the ones with friends were fun enough, the ones in PUGs were not fun at all, mostly because of the lack of communication. It’s like everyone knew what they were doing or perhaps they just didn’t want to talk to anyone — maybe there was no reason to communicate in the first place. Is that a design flaw or perk?

There is also a thriving roleplay community that I knew about only peripherally. I know where to find them out of game, and I’ve seen the advertisements in zone chat, but I couldn’t tell you where they normally hang out. In fact, there are regular events that I’m aware of, but I’m unsure when and where they happen. Clearly, I’m doing roleplay in ESO wrong because I’m really not doing it at all, despite being the kind of player who writes backstories for my characters and roleplays heavily in other games.

Leading up to the launch of the Morrowind expansion (using the term Morrowind is getting really confusing now), I will be in heavy research mode. I’m going to try all of the parts of the game I haven’t tried for the longest time: PvP, Trials, dungeons, roleplay, and anything else that I can find. I know that I might not be playing the game wrong because I’m playing it how I enjoy it, but I want to ensure I’m not poorly serving those of you who read this column by making my scope so narrow.

So your homework in the comments is to let me know what I’m missing. What should I be playing? What has been your favorite content? Solo or in a group? I look forward to reading about them, and in the coming weeks, I will give them a try. Thank you in advance.

Traverse the troubled land of Tamriel in the Elder Scrolls Online. Larry Everett will be your guide here in Tamriel Infinium every other week as you explore together the land created by ZeniMax and Bethesda. If you have any burning questions, send them his way via email or via Twitter.
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74 Comments on "Tamriel Infinium: Am I playing Elder Scrolls Online wrong?"

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Godson69

I like to think where ESO shines is the great stories, and how certain NPC’s have a history that you get to see unfold. This is also a downside, especially if you are a completionist, because once you have done everything once, you get to do it again on an alt, and again on another alt….

The best way, in my opinion, to play the game is to take your time, play it as you get to it. Don’t make a checklist for each zone, save all that for when you start to get bored. Then go after achievements, or just find another game to juggle back and forth between. I usually play ESO as my main game, STO whenever a new episode comes out, and Warframe when I just want to mindlessly kill crap. Someday I might even go back to SWtoR, if they ever figure out what game they are supposed to be producing…

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Ryan Brown

I’ve been playing ESO for a few years now. I’d have to say mostly non-stop. I have lots of kids so I’m limited to about 3 hrs a day. I find it difficult to make gold and I grind exploring all the time. I run around solo most of the time, unless somebody in my guild is actually interested in pairing up for a while. I am not very impressed with the gear I have found in the time I’ve played. It seems like at cp 211 I can’t find any equipment better than what I’ve had since cp 100. I’ve built myself a dragonknight tank as my main. I would like to do more group instances but it seems like no matter who I am with we get our assess kicked in dungeons.
Saying all this, I will put in that I love this game and am still consumed by it every day.
I would love any advice on the gold situation. I see people trying to sell things for 50k or more. I think in the few years I’ve been playing I’ve made a total of 150k. Where are people getting the gold to buy these items and also some of these houses?

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Jokerchyld

Thought I was the only one who felt this way :) I came back after One Tamriel and it was great. ESO had everything that I wanted. Sandbox gameplay (do whatever I want, go where I want). Housing. Strong character customization. Justice system. Dungeons. Explorations. Collectibles. Fully-voiced quests. What else could I want?

But after I play for a few hours I lose interest and want to play something else. Now I always come back to ESO I’m level 28 now. But I definitely haven’t been able to do the long type gaming sessions that I would do in say WoW or Everquest.

At first I thought it was my crazy restrictions (like not doing Thieves guild or Dark Brotherhood before finishing AD quests). Thats part of it, I need to stop “forcing” myself to play linearly and just run around doing whatever content I think is cool at the moment. That hasnt worked out for me in the past which is I stopped it, but maybe for ESO it will work.

I do also tend to agree with others here about the combat. While I do enjoy it, it IS engaging. I have to dodge, block, strong attack, skill, light attack dodge! After a few hours it does get tiring especially since the enemies scale with you (it never gets easier).

But I think the thing in the back of my mind that bugs me is the pacing. I haven’t found any over the top epic content to complete. I noticed that was what I liked about wow. For all of its faults it made fighting and progressing fun.

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Hazel Pendley

What I’ve always loved about the ES game line is there is no “wrong.” It’s massively open map, diverse quest lines and varied themes allow for a lot of individuality. The inclusion of zenimax and mom RPG traded some of the depth traditionally found in Bethesda titles for broader range of interaction. That being said, do what intrigues you and you won’t ever be bored. I love the trial content and teaching. So, I run a Trials training guild. I teach all 4 trials and do a loop of them every Saturday. I teach vet progression as well. I have support chats for members interested in refining builds for specific roles, and when player skill exceeds the level needed for my guild, I connect them to other guilds that do harder content. In theory, I do the same content over and over every week. In reality, that content is enjoyed through the lens of people who ate new to it and find it exciting. Find what you like and enjoy it how you want to. The game offers a lot for those willing to look into it. That being said, I am on PS4 and if anyone is interested in or intimidated by trial content and wants an Intro, feel free to message me. Lady_Ramoth GM of Trait Research

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Scott

“However, some of my friends, who have been playing consistently, are complaining that there isn’t anything left to do in the game.”

Isn’t this what those same people, who probably play one game for 4 hrs a day will say for ANY MMO?

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MrSaxon

My friends and I currently spend our weeks in ESO doing solo activity and then meeting up every Saturday for a few hours of dungeon running. It’s a lot of fun because you spend the preceding five or six days playing around with your character build (and maybe even getting new skills) and then you get to test them out together.

hurbster
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hurbster

My main is about cp 250, and is coming to the end of the Daggerfall campaign (started out in EHP). I have just maxed out Mages Guild so I now have the last Ultimate for my build.

I have a bunch of low level ALTs from back when we needed them as mules.

I am in two guilds, both social/trading ones. One of them may involve Llamas, the other Wulves. I can sell all my stuff with those two but I’m mainly there for the chat.

I have zero interest in group dungeons, arenas, trials or PvP. I realise that I’m never going to have best in slot, quite happy running in julianos/mother’s sorrow. If I really want to go that route I can just visit the various Guild shops and buy them.

Not bored yet 😎

Your friends should take a break and come back when Morrowind drops, that’s what most people do.

My main in the same guy I have played since beta, I took a break for a year and came back for One Tamriel.

Also​, never forgot all the crap I took for liking ESO from certain forum posters.

dixa
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dixa

i see a few comments about getting to cp200+ etc and stopping because the combat is boring.

that is not why you stopped.

I too find myself stopping around this point, or when I’ve taken an alt to 50 and started on cadwell’s.

The problem is that the combat is tiring. It’s not braindead hotkey mashing, you have to pay attention. A lot. for long stretches.

I love ESO and i have no MAIN mmorpg that i play as I play several, but this is a game i can only do a few times a year because the combat wears me the hell out after only a couple of hours of play.

good thing? bad thing? nah, i’m just getting old.

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Mr Poolaty

I got very board with the game after learning at the recipes and weapon armor types… The provisioning/cooking skill was so vanilla besides collecting recipes with level 1 recipes being the hardest to obtain…
As a crafter I find this game to be shit!

Also there is no epic relic mythic legendary armor weapons to chase or grind for….

And getting to max level is an easy ass walkthrough… I mean I don’t think my 5 year old nephew would have a hard time getting there…

Overall I just think there is to much for me not to like about this game for me to come back…

hurbster
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hurbster

My main is a crafter and I like the crafting system. It’s all about the rare styles you can find.

And why chase mythic stuff when I can make my own ?

django857
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django857

I got a character to CP 254 and i just couldn’t play it anymore. The combat is so boring with only limited hot keys. If the combat is boring then people will leave the game. I just got so sick of it. And with group content in control by elitist well that doesn’t help the game much.

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Jeff

You know I have been playing since beta and it blows my mind that anyone has ran out of things to do, unless they absolutely live in the game and then we need to discuss health issues.

What I have noticed is people running out of their favorite thing to do in game which is usually Dungeons and Trials.

ESO simply isn’t a raid centric game, it never will be, and that isn’t a bad thing. Raiders in WoW, Wildstar FFXIV and every other raid centric MMo have been screaming for non raiders to go somewhere else…well now they have a place to go. /shrug.

I don’t think your doing anything wrong per se Larry, maybe it’s just not your cup o tea.

smuggler-in-a-yt
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smuggler-in-a-yt

Out of curiosity – Steam has the One Tamriel basic on sale for less than ten bucks this week. With Morrowind being out now, are there big things you’ll miss out on if you drop the cash on OT in order to see the game? (And yes, I know it’s free this week, but I’ve been meaning to buy OT for a long time now, and figured I should do it while I was thinking about it)

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Alex Willis

One Tamriel ESO is very much an open-ended proposition. It’s certainly no sandbox — not even close — but it does leave open a lot of possibilities for travel, activity, and achievement. Frankly, it’s exactly the kind of MMO I’m looking for right now: lots of channels to opt-in, low barriers to entry, high replayability, and immersive exploration and PvE.

Frankly, I’m a little baffled people have run out of things to do. Not *completely* surprised — GW2 remains the only MMO I have ever successfully run at “endgame” for more than a few months, and I know that lots of people pound their way to endgame fast and then sit there. Alternately, it has been a few years since the game came out and it’s possible someone has just done…well, everything.

I don’t have that problem and I don’t think many people do have that problem. With Morrowind coming out and more content likely on the horizon, the game is in a very good spot right now for things to do. So…I’m not seeing the “so many other people starting to get bored with the game” you’re observing.

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A Dad Supreme

Stopped playing ESO for three reasons:

1. Game is far too “add on” dependent. Trying to do anything is irritating unless you conform to that idea.

2, Guild system/Auction store system sucks. No, I don’t want t join 5 guilds just to get the best chance to find gear and items, and check to see what items I put where for sale in which guild.

3. Dungeons were okay but queue still broken.

These are my reasons for not playing, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a great game… which it is. It just means I can’t be bothered to deal with that irritation on a daily basis, and the reasons above limit my activities to ‘single player’ status.

aYates
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aYates

I think ESO is one of the best MMO’s on the market BUT I personally don’t like the multi-guild system, because I think it’s harder to build a personal connection with fellow guildies if you’re not even sure if they’re reading your guild’s chat or some others.
And, I really, really don’t like seeing my account name instead of my char’s name in guild chat.
Small things, I know, but it affects my overall feelings about the game.

I am intrigued by the new housing system, though, so I could go back someday…

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Melissa McDonald

I had the exact same experience with ESO. I felt like I was missing something, surely. The game looked good. it seemed deep. But I was disconnected, disengaged, disembodied, and otherwise just didn’t click with it. It was like hearing a language you don’t understand. it might as well be the chattering of monkeys.

xpsync
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xpsync

I love exploring so update saved the day for me there, and I’m not going to pretend i never felt the way you do either. I know exactly how you feel, in fact your post is word for word of the way i once felt. I couldn’t have been more disappointed in this mmo up until update 12 tbh.
Update 12 not only opened me up to explore anywhere but it also allowed me to be selective in the zones i like to play in and only invest in the quest lines i find interesting.
Having the Thieves guild and Dark Brotherhood are essentially must have’s, without them the game isn’t nearly as good, it’s really too bad they aren’t part of the core.
Bottom line though if there isn’t a spark of interest, don’t force it.

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Roger Melly

I enjoy the social side of mmos too and I think that is part of what is lacking in ESO . The problem might be because people join multiple guild it’s hard to find one that players feel invested in . There probably are a few of them about but I’ve never managed to find one .

I also have quite a negative view of the community after seeing one antisocial player after another in dungeons mouthing off at someone because they didn’t know the tactics (rather than helping them) . It got to the point that I ended up turning off all chat apart from general and guild channels . This only served to make me feel like I was playing a single player game even more than I had when I was questing .

I don’t think I will rush out and buy the expansion though but if I see it on offer at some point I’ll get it .

The questing was fun but beyond that I found it to be ultimately a bit soulless .

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jay

Currently ESO is the most open ended MMORPG type game on the market IMHO, with GW2 being a close 2nd. While most MMO’s have a structured path, which slowly funnels players to end game. ESO is 100% open from the conception. At any point you can go anywhere, and do anything.

Yes there are vet dungeons, trials, etc at end game you can participate in. But what about that cave over there you never explored? Yes, at some point, you will have experienced everything the game has to offer. By the time you have reached that point though, you will have spent a year or more of enjoyment in the game. How often does it take you to finish most MMO’s content? A month or two?

The MMORPG genre could learn a lot from ESO.

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odin valhalla

You are 100% correct. With one notable cavaet, its only recently that this is the case. The players the author is talking about seem to have been in the game for some time. If you are starting today or a month ago, you really lucked out as ESO has been vetted and is top notch.

If you started playing say after craglorn, or IC? You’ve probably seen the cave.

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jay

It’s impossible to make a PVE mmorpg with endless content. Eventually, if you play it long enough, you are going to see every nook and cranny. There is no way that a team of dev’s can keep up with the rate at which players devour content. ESO does the best job of this by far, by offering a myriad of non-exploration activities to keep players in engaged as well, but even their pool will run dry eventually.

The only way around this is by using player generated content. A lot of other games have tried this route, but it never works out with PVE games. Too many players abuse the systems, find loopholes and exploits, and generally just ruin the games.

Player created content works real well in a pvp game on the other hand, as they are ever evolving, and each engagement is different. So you rarely ever see the same fight twice. Unfortunately there’s a huge market that doesn’t like PVP in MMORPG’s.

Maybe, some day in the future, tech will eventually catch up to the point where the games can develop massive procedurally generated quality content on their own, without developer micromanagement. But, we’re not there yet.

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Giannis Papadopoulos

If you play one character yes.. but if the MMO have interesting class builds you wanna try…

I cannot count how many different builds i wanna try/play in ESO. There is lot of replayability in that.

Polyanna
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Polyanna

I think what you’re finding is that ESO is a different kind of game; maybe a lot more different than you thought it was, if you actually let yourself play it the way you obviously are enjoying.

I was playing this game the other day and I finally realized that the times when I feel like I get the most out of my time in a new zone in ESO is actually when I just wander around aimlessly and do whatever thing I happen to find, rather than trying to “clear” things in any order.

It feels like a very odd way to play through when you’re used to games that try to put everything on rails. But it made me realize, when you can go anywhere, and do anything, usually the most rewarding thing to do is whatever is nearest at the time. Find a quest, do it. Find a skyshard, grab it. Find a dungeon, clear it. Dark Anchor is up while you’re wandering by on your way to something else? Go ahead and join in. At the end of an hour or two, you’ve done a lot; actually a lot more than I feel like I do when I’m trying to do anything specific.

I think all you’re finding is that, to really get ESO, in its current form, after One Tamriel, you have to unlearn some things that you probably have been heavily conditioned to do and think and assume when playing the sort of level-gated, on-rails game worlds that are so pervasive, even in games that pretend to encourage exploration. And there isn’t a single thing wrong with that. In fact it’s amazing if you let it be.

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Schmidt.Capela

That is very much how I play every ESO and Fallout game. The wide open world is a bane if you just want to go straight through the main story, but a great boon if you enjoy losing yourself in it and doing whatever piques your interest.

In fact, I rarely finish a playthrough of one such single-player, but open ended, game in less than a few dozen to few hundred hours, despite it usually being possible to finish the main story in just a couple hours.

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David Spake

To each his/her own. I know many players who love the incredibly deep content in ESO and have little-to-no interest in Vet dungeons, “that last piece of dungeon armor” or anything along those lines. Some of them are working hard at their housing, others are working on zone completions, or Master Angler. Do what you enjoy, the let those who are bored with ESO move on to something else. Frankly (from personal experience), the two hours or so a day I get to play, there’s enough PvE content currently in the game to keep me interested for some time. If I get 3 years out of ESO (like I did with GW2), I’ll be quite happy and to heck with those who require “a something new” fix constantly.

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Robert Mann

Enjoy the story, that’s where ESO is best imo. Relax, craft, and just take it slow.

Dungeons, especially with pug-friendly being a basic requirement anymore, are designed so that no communication is required. It’s a flaw to some of us, and a perk to others. Sadly, AAA all went the same way, so there’s no real variety of options there right now.

AvAvA is… still problematic. Although they addressed many imbalances, the base mode is really more of A+AvA. Which tends to make for a less than interesting dynamic quite frequently. Add to that problems with zerging (they even purposefully nerfed aoe helping zerging.)

ESO remains an odd mix of casual aimed play for the most part, combined with not-so-casual aimed systems including gold sinks and bag space restrictions (for non-subscribers.) It’s solid overall, if you can deal with that and the load screens (or in my case optimization problems that apply only to this game.)

xpsync
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xpsync

It’s rather quite simple: Are you having fun enjoying your time, Yes or No?
If Yes: Keep playing.
If No: Stop playing.

Not to be disrespectful as yes i know it’s an activity in itself to debate and talk about games, it’s a big part of it. However the endless analyzing the chit out of of them is becoming a sickness almost.

I’ve been staying off sites due to this reason and… being totally hooked into Andromeda fearful of spoilers has helped allot, but it’s the same whining about every game, and to be perfectly honest staying away from this disease i found my enjoyment of games has literally skyrocketed.

The biggest problem i have now is finding sites to discus games with other people whom enjoy them and want to talk shop, not constantly whine and reevaluate, talk about story lines, quests, discoveries, combat mechanics, you know game stuff, not wishy washy cry baby feeling chit and hate.

Games have never been better, yet the shear volume of blubbering has only grown exponentially. It’s a whole new world of gaming without the perpetual influx of baggage of others whom feel it’s their duty to constantly dump their garbage on us whom only want to enjoy the world of gaming.

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Wanda Clamshuckr

^^ Amen.

The biggest problem i have now is finding sites to discus games with other people whom enjoy them and want to talk shop, not constantly whine and reevaluate, talk about story lines, quests, discoveries, combat mechanics, you know game stuff, not wishy washy cry baby feeling chit and hate.

I go here. It’s a good place to discuss things with a generally helpful community. Yes, you will get the occasional asshat, but it’s light-years beyond the cesspool that is the official forums.

Games have never been better, yet the shear volume of blubbering has only grown exponentially.

And there is the blubbering simply to blubber, when nothing of real importance is happening. It’s cancerous. That needs to stop as well. Fabrication simply to glean clicks.

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kidwithknife

I knew I wasn’t the only one feeling this way, but it’s still really good to hear someone else say it. It seems to me that it’s become intensely unfashionable to actually enjoy playing a game that actually exists; people would rather piss and moan about the games they play, insult players who actually enjoy gaming, and obsess over upcoming games that we all know couldn’t possibly live up to their own hype. Having fun? Then you’re a noob or a sucker or a fanboy/girl. It sucks, and it seems like that’s the state of MMO culture in general these days and for the foreseeable future.

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Ben Stone

Not really. The end game / progression is bad so casual gameplay is exactly how you should play ESO.

hurbster
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hurbster

How is it bad ?

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Bryan

This is funny I burned out on Legion before January and was just entertaining myself with Marvel Heroes and the BUE but was getting bored with that. So I was wondering what to do and decided I’d try ESO though I’ve never been a big fan of Elder Scrolls(the last one I played was Morrowind and I stopped playing after maybe 10 hours). Thus I’m a bit leary so a week or so ago(before this weeks free play trial offer) I bit the bullet but couldn’t remember their pay scheme went to the website and after much poking around finally concluded it was buy to play(it doesn’t really say on website). Ok great couldn’t decide to go basic or deluxe to start at as wasn’t sure how I’d like the game…

Finally realized either way I need to make an account. First issue made account but it had to confirm my email said they sent the confirmation email, 15 minutes later no email after another 10 minutes of checking spam folders and then having them resend confirmation email still nothing. Did something else for an hour checked email and behold there is the confirmation email. Confirmed email go to log into account doesn’t work(turns out it was my fault I managed to misspell my long standing account name(left out a letter) however to fix this had to wait for an email…. another hour plus later got email. By this time I no longer was interested and took it as a sign not bother:).

Seriously would have downloaded the free trial this week but realized I hadn’t played LOTRO in 4 years and I’m a lifetime subscriber and have been having fun there. So thanks to the fact that they use the slowest auto email system in the world no money from me!

If not for that I’d suggest you start your own guild for new players and I’d have been happy to join!

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Arktouros

Like go to any inn in the game and you’re going to trip over large groups of people emoting all over each other in an orgy of “role playing.” I had turn emotes off in chat because, quite frankly, the spam was atrocious going into any Inn to cook my daily writ in just about any town.

Otherwise ESO has a lot of “stuff” to do but none of it is overly exciting. It’s like world completion in GW2. It’s there. You should probably do it. It’s a nice and neat list of things to do. But man, terribly exciting it is not. It’s the same thing with ESO. That Lower Craglorn or Wrothgar maps aren’t going to complete themselves but each time I’ve set out to do them I’ve logged out after the first quest or POI.

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Dug From The Earth

From a typical “Got to max level, and did the loot grind” aspect, ESO is very lacking. (thats not the type of game it was designed to be, although it does support aspects of that gameplay).

Here is an example of how its lacking:

(terminology key for the new ESO player: Trial = Raid, Pledge = Daily dungeon quest, Vet/Veteran = hard mode.)

1. Daily pledges quickly become pointless after you get the Armor piece you need for your build. You only do pledge for keys, that open a chest, that has a chance to randomly drop 1 of several specific set items for a specific armor part (shoulders only). Once you get the shoulder set you want, there is no reason to open these chests anymore, making pledges moot.

2. Vet Trials – Aside from “Our guild likes to challenge itself with the hardest content out there”, the ONLY reason to do Veteran Trials is for the chance of Legendary Jewelry. Jewelry pieces are the ONLY items that you cant “Craft up” to legendary status, and thus the only way to get them as legendary quality, is from Veteran Trials. This poses one of two problems. 1. You do vet trials and get the 3 items you need, which means you never need to do vet trials again, or 2. You realize that Purple quality jewelry is good enough, since all the rest of your gear is legendary, so you dont care about doing vet trials.

3. Vet Dungeons – If you arent needing to farm keys for pledges, the only reason to do Vet Dungeons is to get the 2nd piece of your Monster set (the helmet). Once you have gotten that, there really isnt a point to doing Vet dungeons.

A lot of the problem stems from how relevant they made the crafting system in ESO. You can take ANY piece of armor, or weapon, and upgrade the quality of it. So it means you can run a normal difficulty dungeon, get that specific set item shield you want in blue quality, take it to a woodworking table, and upgrade it to purple, and then to legendary quality (providing you have the materials to do so – which isnt hard).

This means you can have a complete set of legendary gear (minus the jewelry) without EVER having to do a Veteran dungeon or Trial. Because of this, it removes the need and often any desire to take part in content that the devs have put in the game to give players something to do.

There simply isnt a reason or incentive to do a lot of this content at end game because it quickly becomes moot… IF you are an mmorpg player who is in it for the loot grind.

… HOWEVER… if you are a gamer who enjoys exploring, story lines, gathering materials, role playing, or socializing, then ESO has a LOT of longevity and things to do for you. If your hardware is beefy enough, even PvP can be entertaining for a lengthy time due to the sheer size of cyrodiil, and the addition of the Imperial City DLC.

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odin valhalla

I’ve been playing ESO since beta and will be leaving it in June or around when TSW goes f2p.

I’d like to put this out there first, that the best players in any MMO regardless of playstyle are the ones that are having fun. ESO has evolved to a very easy game. On the plus side that has attracted (according to them) millions more players. On the down side it’s easy so you bore faster. A few examples:

1. VR ranks were hard to come by (before Craglorn)

2. There were fewer sets and they were harder to get. The game is literally flooded with gear sets and they are easy to farm.

3. The game initially was designed to require skill. Addons for buff and debuff trackers came later. In the beginning you had to use visual cues to time skill rotations (like console does).

4. One tamriel: Acclaimed for its seamless play style possibilities it destroyed the faction story line system. Prior, if you wanted to do AD story you had to Caldwell’s, which I might add was hard the VR mobs hit very hard.

5. Champion points: This one system is the heart of the progression game now as everything scales (the scaling is a mistake IMHO). CP now has made powerful characters off the charts. Resource management? Remember that? Because of CP and scaling there is literally no point in the PVE questing/leveling experience where you are threatened to die, unless you make a sloppy mob pull or attempt to solo group content.

So I understand they are bored, a lot of people are. However ESO has a wealth of content that honestly I don’t see matched in any other game out now. It may be better to say they need a break from the game, but I’ve never met anyone who’s completed all the content.
If they want a challenge have them find Miaq the liar in all zones. I mean on and on it goes for things to do. You aren’t playing wrong if you are having fun.

Reader
Robert Mann

I played beta. I loved that things were difficult. Nerfs came. Game felt just mind-numbingly easy. I played a little more. Got bored. Yep.

I mean, it still does some things very well, but I’d agree the difficulty curve went from maybe a little too high to WAY too low.

Reader
Dug From The Earth

PvE questing/leveling is non-threatening even to a non-CP character. It has to do with the rather generic and mundane scaling that is done for all enemies across the board (except for world bosses).

They should have made many more tiers of difficulty. Example

Enemies in Group A – These scale at a 100% ratio
Enemies in Group B – Still common, but more challenging – these have a 120% scale modifier
Enemies in Group C – Minor champions – these will make you watch your health bar – 150% modifier
Enemies in Group D – Minor Bosses – Bring a friend – 200% mod
Enemies in Group E – Bosses – Bring a group – 250% mod

Things could still scale as they do now, but there would be a lot more variety in challenge level. Right now its either “I can 3 shot 15 enemies at once” or “I need a friend to kill this world boss”

There is no inbetween.

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odin valhalla

Scaling damaged the pve/leveling experience IMHO. It doesnt negate the fact that there is absolutely stellar story lines and sub stories within the PVE leveling. Its a face roll and its not even mildly challenging now. Not to mention the XP you get.

They have adjusted the XP so many times its ridiculous to the point it looks like they just threw up their hands and said “get em to 50 ASAP”

Reader
Robert Mann

Except they got feedback mostly from people wanting the stupidly easy level of difficulty all through beta. They had more challenge then, and they nerfed it to pieces. The only change with OT was that if you had previously out-leveled or under-leveled stuff that was no longer true.

As an aside, scaling has always been off in favor of the player. Taking a 16 into Cyrodil and you had more of every stat than you would at high levels since, well, launch.

Reader
Loyal Patron
imayb1

Is there are ‘wrong’ way to play any MMO? Take the parts you like, leave the parts you don’t. If it’s mostly don’t– then don’t play.

Reader
MeltWithYou

You’ve done better than I could ever do Larry – I’ve been playing since beta and have yet to get a single character past 41 or 42. Most of the time, I’ll pick up the controller and play….and literally fall asleep, controller in hand. I don’t know if its the music…I don’t know if its the combat…ESO is like melatonin to me.

Not saying its a bad game…its not…it just makes me pass out

Reader
Bannex

Ah the old “who is responsible for my fun in this mmo?” debate…

I’ll agree with the writer that after a few glorious moments eso settles in to a relatively pedestrian experience.

Much like the Witcher 3, the game is nestled into a gorgeous, deep game world with a boring and repetitive gameplay experience.

That being said, the writer is playing a mmo, not in an active guild and is mostly doing dailies that pertain to crafting.

Yeah buddy, I’d be bored too…

Reader
Robert Mann

Yeah, he didn’t say he was bored, but I agree that one could get there easily.

Bree Royce
Staff
Bree Royce

He didn’t say he was bored, and he didn’t say he thought it was a pedestrian experience either. He said his friends and guildies were bored and it made him wonder whether he was doing something wrong since he was just fine.

Reader
Bannex

Look I read the article, he says I’m not bored my friends are but I don’t do anything I regularly enjoy in mmos am I playing the game wrong?

I’m not sure what stance he’s taking… is he enjoying the game and questioning his friends while saying he doesn’t really play the game consistently or do anything he typically enjoys so he must be doing it wrong?

Forgive me for not fully understanding the point of the article but it really reads like he’s saying he’s bored without saying he himself is bored.

No I’m not trolling, I’m genuinely confused at the point.

Reader
Frank White

I feel compelled to ask, since you postulate a problem that you seem to already know the solution to, but for some reason haven’t yet tried: join a guild. Join more than one guild. If you have friends who play the game, why not join one of their guilds, or form a guild yourselves? You can even join a RP guild. One gets the impression from reading this that you and your friends are all just meandering around in the game solo or occasionally hooking up together, but that NONE of you are in a guild – and then afterward you console each other over the lack of social interaction.

http://tamrielfoundry.com/groups/

((Post edited by mod.))

Bree Royce
Staff
Bree Royce

As the article says, he’s in a guild, and his friends are in a guild that does high-end content. He also wasn’t lamenting a lack of social interaction or complaining about his status, and the “consoling” stuff is not only off the mark but rude.

Reader
Frank White

What I actually read was, “I don’t really have a guild. I mean, I’m in one, but it’s inactive. ” So maybe he needs to join a couple that are, you know, active…? And I don’t recall anything about his friends being in guilds and doing high-end content. Maybe you need to go BACK to school and brush up on your reading comprehension skills.

Reader
Bannex

While I don’t agree with personally attacking the author I must say you’re not the only one confused by the issue (or lack thereof) stated in the article.

Either he is enjoying the game or not, I’m not really getting the whole point of bringing up the fact that he normally enjoys social interaction but is in an inactive guild.

Reader
Frank White

Well, that’s just it, I guess – I didn’t see it as an “attack.” While I can understand that he might not have liked the suggestion that the article was maybe click-bait, I was polite enough about it, and I certainly didn’t use profanities or call anyone names – or suggest that they should “stay in school,” as one person on staff said to me. ;)

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Katriana

If you’re having fun that’s what’s important. Don’t try to push yourself to rush to the top to see all the things just because you think you”should”. Take time to look around and smell the roses so to speak. Perhaps it’ll lead you to some cool out of the way stuff you can share with us.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

However, I do understand what they mean: Anything else they can do in game would be boring or unachievable.

That is very much how I think nowadays. I play through content I find fun; if it isn’t fun then I’m not playing it, regardless of rewards or which other content is gated by it, and thus said content and everything beyond it might as well not exist as far as I’m concerned.

Or, in other words, I’m done playing through content I don’t enjoy.

Reader
McGuffn

No you’re not playing wrong, its just that its possible to see everything the game has to offer and from then on you’re just treading water.

Reader
Bannex

Boring, samey quests and simplistic console style combat does this game no favors

hurbster
Reader
hurbster

Imo, the quests are neither boring or samey.

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