Fan video covers the rise and fall of the EverQuest franchise

    
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Power whelming. Power with just the right amount of whelm.

If you read MJ’s recent column covering the history of the EverQuest franchise, you may find yourself quite nostalgic for Norrath. In that case, we have another trip through the past for you to enjoy, this one from YouTuber Nerd Slayer.

As part of his “Death of a Game” series, Nerd Slayer looks at the rise and fall of the EverQuest franchise as a whole. He starts with the amazing success of the initial game, the attempt of EverQuest II to compete with World of Warcraft, and the ultimate demise of Landmark and EverQuest Next.

Despite the title, this video does treat the franchise from an affectionate and well-informed angle. It’s an interesting watch, and it’s all yours after the break. What do you think? Will Daybreak ever revive the EverQuest franchise or have we seen the definitive end of this era? Let us know in the comments!

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Jokerchyld

I found Everquest after it was past its prime and it still stands as the most impressive online experience that I’ve ever had. Unfortunately its mechanics have become archaic due to age and no set of polish can bring that back. I still have a sub and secretly believe if someone were to ever re-create that vision people would play it.

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rufty

Regret not playing Landmark before it shutdown! I wonder if there’s a Emu for it out there? Lol! :-)

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Weilan

I played it when it was still active, for about 20 minutes then deleted it. It was essentially a Minecraft clone with a fantasy theme. You can now play Minecraft, imagine it’s Landmark and you won’t know the difference.

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Castagere Shaikura

I think that guys does some great video’s. Man i remember when EQ2 launched. It did feel rushed out because of Wow. It had so many bugs and mob placement was horrible. Compared to Wow the combat felt slow and clunky. The world was beautiful though. I wish someone else could grab up the Everquest IP though. It would be a shame to see it go away.

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Neurotic

Whenever I think about EQ I flash on the 56k modem I bought to play it. Man, did I ever feel like I was living in the future! :D

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Brown Jenkin

I mean, I gave up on it long ago but did people ever get their KS money back for EQNext/Landmark? Or was Landmark considered a product delivered?

Pepperzine
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Pepperzine

People did not get their money back (at least from the company, some may have done charge-backs). Landmark was officially “launched” which help protect them possible refund requests as it was considered complete even though the shut it down shortly after.

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Brown Jenkin

Yeah, I figured this was the case. I didn’t even bother to try for a refund on mine, despite having played Landmark like five to ten times ever. I think for a long time I just refused to recognize how hardcore hoodwinked I’d been in buying a copy of Landmark, a game I had limited interest in, for theoretical benefits and the opportunity to contribute to EQNext .

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Arsin Halfmoon

When he started talking about EQN, it opened old wounds.

Like I literally forgot about that game, and i no lie had that thing in the back of my head, “man, this game would probably be out by now.”

And seriously, why would yhey think the game isnt fun? They never even had the player base decide that shit, just some suits.

See? Old wounds, wide open

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Tim Johnson

And seriously, why would yhey think the game isnt fun? They never even had the player base decide that shit, just some suits.

Why would they give it to the player base? We are ravenous and unforgiving. It should say something that the devs pulled the plug do to lack of fun instead of trying to release an Early Access Beta type thing for EQN like they did EQL. They were too focused on build a game that was monetizable in small granular methods instead of building a working game and then figuring out how to monetize it. it was imo one of the biggest faults of landmark.

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Arsin Halfmoon

The players could have given the feedback, a closed beta or something would have helped.

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Tim Johnson

Yeah, but if the devs hit a point where they were like “This is utter shit we need to scrap this” Why would they want feedback at that point?

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Bruno Brito

Because…they paid?

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Tim Johnson

That’s why it sucks that the game failed before it was made. The players made an investment in a potential game, unfortunately, this investment failed because the dev team they gave money too didn’t deliver. EQL shows they had an engine, but i’m getting the sense based on what they released that they had an idea at the core of the game, and that core idea ultimately turned out to not be fun and they had spent so much money reaching that point that it wasn’t financially viable to start over so they scrapped the project. It blows so hard, but, the people who bought in early were taking a risk by buying into an idea for a product and this risk failed because well.. Daybreak dropped the ball all over the place. I think them dropping what they had on the community would likely have hurt their reputation even more then what they did. They burned their hardcore followers who were willing to invest hard, but I think that if they had released a product so bad they didn’t want to make it, just to appease people, it would have also burned potential future customers of other products AND the hardcore followers.

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Jokerchyld

Or simply put… they f’d up. It was brave and honest and killed any remaining credibility the IP might have had.

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Steven Williams

Now if NerdSlayer could sound less like a tech-to-speech program…

But seriously, EQN was the straw that broke the camel’s back. I have 0 interest in upcoming MMOs anymore. Whatever function in my mind that made hype happen when an MMO is announced, or during various presentations and videos about its development before release… is gone now. It’s just gone. I’m hyped about Kingdom Hearts III, I’m hyped for FFXIV’s continual success, but show a trailer for a new MMO game and I feel nothing. I put the last shreds of my (now-misguided) faith into the continuation of my once-favorite hobby into EQN, and this is what I got for it.

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holyavengerone

That made me tear up, man.

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Tim Johnson

I feel ya man, Let me give you some grey beard perspective, What you experienced sucked but i think you’ll start to find more joy from the hobby as a whole now. The MMO industry thrives on overselling a product without actually having any substance to back up the idea, almost like the entire industry went to the Peter Molyneux school of game marketing. I mean just look at the Pre-release stuff for Warhammer: Age of Reckoning. That was the title that broke me a decade ago. I was following all the hype pre-launch from when it was announced, right up until they announced they weren’t going to launch with everything they had said. Made me take a step back, and second guess. Add in that I did buy into Age of Conan and you can see how i could be disappointed. I still find a lot of fun in MMOs, but i completely ignore the pre-release chatter and make my choice after the game is out for a month or 2 so i can see what kind of game it is, and see if i want to buy in.

For me, It’s helped me enjoy a game for what it actually is, and not judge it based on what the developers had hyped it to be. Rather then letting a spectre of what could be ruin the fun that is there.

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Steven Williams

Great advice! I found that, while EQN’s cancellation removed any hype for new MMOs, It’s strengthened my love for existing ones. I think everyone who’s into MMOs have kinda adapted this way. That’s why we’re talking a lot less about Crowfall/Pantheon/Insert Korean Port here/Shroud of the Avatar/that one stupidly expensive space game, and more about FFXIV, Guild Wars 2, The Elder Scrolls Online, and WoW.

I’ve played FFXIV for over 8 years (1.0 alpha), and I’ve been casually playing TESO every now and then. I even picked up Mabinogi again for the social, event-based aspect (prob not gonna play it even remotely as much, but it’s nice that it’s there). And my love for those games – especially FFXIV – have increased stupendously. There’s no new game looming overhead anymore, so I can delve deeper than I ever have.

So I have to sort of thank Daybreak Games for being a morally repugnant a$%hole of a company funded by what may or may not be a Russian money laundering corporation that helped toward ruining the 2016 US election (not trying to cause a political side-discussion, but ya gotta admit it’s quite the massive s$%t-show). How does anyone come back from that?

So I completely get where you’re coming from. :-)

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Jokerchyld

I can second that. I’ve definitely developed a stronger attachment to Elder Scrolls Online. The more I play the more it feels like an EQ spiritual successor. Definitely the closest in experience due to One Tamriel.

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rafael12104

Good vid overall. BUT, I don’t view EQ and EQII as failures. In fact I argue that they are standard bearers. The fact that they are still in production and continue to drop content and attract players is indicative of that.

The EQN debacle deserves it’s own video, to be honest. This vid covers it, but there is much more detail that is cringe worthy and fascinating with regard to how a great promise can turn into a great failure.

Still, this video made it’s points well. And it does leave me thinking about everything that a future MMO has the potential to accomplish.

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Bruno Brito

I don’t think he does either. He only mentions that both EQ and EQ2, while vastly different, were successful games because they outlived, and just kept trodding under the shadow of WoW. They wouldn’t kill WoW, but they worked, they were fun, and each had it’s own merits.

The games just got old, just passed their time. They didn’t fail, they just weren’t WoW, so they would live in that shadow, and still do.

xpsync
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xpsync

They tried to make EQ2 and i guess EQ as well; easy like wow. Problem was they were not built to be that way and you feel it when you play them. I love challenge and is allot of what kept me in EQ2, it’s not like wow was a complete turn off, it was simply built to be forgiving and casual and nothing wrong with that.

What becomes wrong is when every game studio tried to make and or morph their games to be that way too. It really started to come down to may as well just play wow then for allot of people.

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Bruno Brito

My problem with EQ2 is how convoluted it is. It’s meant to be forgiving, but you have 40 skills. It’s meant to be simple, but you have talent xp untied with normal xp. It’s meant to be casual, but the game is just too huge and unexplained.

I would keep the ungodly ammount of content, but the classes could use some pruning while keeping some downtime. Also, the combat could be less clunky. If they wanna copy WoW, at least go Vanilla.

xpsync
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xpsync

What a time. I was there at launch for EQ2 and really started to dig the game, it was very challenging, and yes frustrating as it was so brutally hard and punishing when you died.

Then i was there at launch for Wow, like a few weeks later from what i can remember. The difference between the two games was night and day. Wow was so forgiving, and compared to EQ2 easy going, so casual.

I ended up playing EQ2 mainly due to the servers never being up for Wow, i could not compare them, came down to i can play EQ2 as the servers were up, could not even log into wow for like 3 days at one point. So i gave up even trying was far too frustrating.

Long story short met some great peeps in EQ2 and rocked the game hard for about 4 years. Amazing time, and it’s not like i never played wow ever again.

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nobleeinherjar

This video was really informative and fun, but also made me sad about a lot of MMO-related things beyond just EQ and WoW.

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Bruno Brito

Will Daybreak…

No. /thread