BlizzCon protests begin to officially organize in response to the Hong Kong controversy

    
80
Gotta go back in time.

In news that will come as no surprise to anyone, word has surfaced of an organized protest scheduled for the first day of BlizzCon. Mobilization efforts are being arranged by the non-profit organization Fight for the Future as well as by the organizers of a ProtestBlizzcon subreddit.

Fight for the Future has opened up a dedicated website to help those interested in joining in the protest, along with a Discord and with efforts organized via social media. The protest is set for November 1st outside of the Anaheim Convention Center.

Top heads of Fight for the Future have spoken up against Blizzard’s actions against Hearthstone player Ng “blitzchung” Wai Chung, which were recently walked back to a shorter suspension time for Wai Chung and the two Taiwanese casters caught in the splash damage, as well as a return of Wai Chung’s prize money. “This is not going away,” stated deputy director Evan Greer. “We’re going to make an example out of them to make sure that all companies know that throwing human rights and free expression under the bus to make some extra money will not be tolerated.”

The organization’s work is being helped by a recently opened ProtestBlizzcon subreddit, which is already gaining a large amount of active posts from visitors and subscribers to the sub. Other organizing efforts are being put together there like a GoFundMe page, an encouraging post about how action is starting to have an effect on China, and calls to keep things civil.

According to reporting from Kotaku, ensuring the ProtestBlizzcon subreddit and the protest itself doesn’t devolve into an extremist, harassing, or racist event is important to the mods. “We also don’t want this to become a subreddit of hate against Chinese people,” says Mel “Kazemel89″ Thomspon, one of the sub’s moderators. “So far this subreddit hasn’t become extremist, and I’m glad that most people who have joined support protesting Blizzard in legal and well thought-out plans to gain awareness.”

The Anaheim Convention Center staff are also in the loop and state that they are prepared. “As a major visitor city, we have significant experience hosting high-profile events,” reads an emailed statement from a spokesperson. “The Anaheim Convention Center works closely with event organizers and the Anaheim Police Department to ensure a safe experience for both attendees and those who may want to peacefully express themselves.”

Complete coverage of this Blizzard fiasco:

80
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Anthony Clark

Good.

Remember people, to make a difference to a company you have to hit their bottom line. If you want to make a real difference don’t buy anything from them. That’s the only way to get their attention, and the only way to make any real difference. Keep your money. Starve them.

Reader
aussie_eevee

With all due respect… Get over it.

When you are on someone else’s platform, your freedom of speech is limited. The rules on this very site are governed by a code of conduct.

The interview in question was hosted on a Blizzard platform. Therefore they make the rules on that platform.

Just as Massively OP has the right to delete my post and prevent me from commenting on their site if they want, Blizzard has the right to control what is said on their platform.

Infact, the only ones that do not… is the American government, as the first amendment says you can speak out against the American government if you wish. It doesn’t say that private companies can’t censor you, only that the government can’t.

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

No one means respect when they say ‘with all due respect’.

Smithwicks
Reader
Smithwicks

And just like the right all of these people and groups have to protest a company they feel is morally wrong.

Reader
Bruno Brito

With all due respect… Get over it.

With all due disrespect, no.

When you are on someone else’s platform, your freedom of speech is limited. The rules on this very site are governed by a code of conduct.

Irrelevant. Blizzard went back on it’s decision because of backlash. Not only that, this is a issue on inconsistency. They leave several instances of political showing with their games and yet they ban this kid for one against China, which is a market they’re trying for years to stick their dick into.

Just as Massively OP has the right to delete my post and prevent me from commenting on their site if they want, Blizzard has the right to control what is said on their platform.

Yeah. And? Still irrelevant. Your comment won’t bring Bree issues with her bottom line nor will make her the “victim” of a boycott.

Infact, the only ones that do not… is the American government, as the first amendment says you can speak out against the American government if you wish. It doesn’t say that private companies can’t censor you, only that the government can’t.

Again, so? You’re not getting the point. No one is saying Blizzard doesn’t have the choice to shutdown political speech and take business decisions. They have, and they did. They took the WRONG one, and they’re getting backlash for it.

I wanna know then, why they allowed a series of “Make Azeroth Great Again” hats to exist.

Reader
antmusic2

I’m fine with protest and boycotts.

What gets me is Americans not looking at their own backyard, yet protesting against blizz because they say they didn’t support a protest against China?

I rarely share this, but I chose several years ago never to visit the US again. I used to travel through there frequently from Australia for study/work, and have spent a total of about 8 weeks in total.

Last straw for me was seeing a policeman or security guy belt a man with some sort of truncheon while waiting at a coach station in Washington – because he had his head on his wife’s lap. And no one reacted.

I also experienced
– Hearing gunshots just off from the Chinese theatre place in LA (And seeing a guy was lying on the ground)
– driving out of LAX in rented car after 14 hr flight – right into a petrol station being held up
– almost being mugged by a gang in SAN FRAn because I had wandered into the “wrong” part of the city ( and the homelessness there was shocking)

I’m am currently reading Janesville. It really confirms that YOUR county is broken. And for Americans to criticise other places without any obvious self-awareness makes me mad.

Reader
Bryan Correll

The “Your country has problems so you can’t complain about the problems in other countries” is so weak and worn out that that it’s not worth addressing.

But Blizzard IS in our “backyard.” It is an American company. And American companies that actively assist governments (including the US government) in suppressing political freedom deserve to be called out.

#poohdidnothingwrong

Smithwicks
Reader
Smithwicks

Don’t worry, in America we address a lot of these concerns much in the same way corporations try new things, we use focus groups. You see you take a small sample group like a city, a county, or a state. Then you try new policies on the sample size you think would be a good representation of how said policy would work on the national or even the global level. All three of our western coastal states are very liberal with their politics and they have been trying a lot of new policies over the last decade or more. While some have been deemed a success and even adopted within the federal government to bring them to the national level, a lot have also been complete failures with unattended consequences. You can’t fault them for trying to make things better for people, but at the same time we also don’t hold those same politicians accountable for their failures when a policy goes horribly wrong.

I’m not sure how the story of Janesville relates to a broken country. Quite the opposite in fact. It epitomizes American resilience in the face of utter economic collapse. If anything truly negative wanted to be taken away from the story, it’s the cold hearted nature of both corporations and government.

Try America again sometime, but not it’s cities. I love my country, but even I am not a fan of our cities.

Reader
Bruno Brito

You know where Blizzard is located, right?

I mean, yeah, America is a broken country, but this is mainly targeted at Blizzard.

Reader
drew who

Blizzard will probably look to emulate the Chinese government at this years convention and not allow any question and answer sessions in case they get asked some awkward questions . There wont be any freedom of speech for fans this year and anyone protesting Blizzards recent actions of the last week with be quickly removed .

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

Nice. From that, I can leave my Blizzard account for good.

Reader
aussie_eevee

Blizzcon is for a celebration of Blizzard games… Not for protesting China’s actions against Hong Kong.

Smithwicks
Reader
Smithwicks

It can be both. That’s the beauty of it.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Loyal Patron
Jack Pipsam

Please be true, I would love there to be a proper protest at Blizzard’s door.

Techno Wizard
Reader
Techno Wizard

A refund would probably hit Blizz harder.

Reader
Robert Mann

Where I fully support people protesting things, I do hope they keep it both classy and respectful to those who don’t wish to join in.

I find the attempts to force people’s involvement as offensive as the things being protested, if not more, generally. A worthy cause does not need to force people to listen, but will instead inspire through being above that need.

Reader
Robert Mann

Also… *I claim no credit here for this image. It’s just a repost.*

72206599_1122083114667413_5838630064610082816_n.jpg
Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
TomTurtle

People who say “keep politics out of my (insert thing here)” are ignoring that politics pervasively shapes every aspect of our lives, and for those without the privilege of living in even a fairly democratic society it’s the equivalent of hearing the rest of the world saying: “I don’t want your suffering to ruin my good time. “

I liked that in the linked Reddit post. I also saw some good references this past week to Martin Luther King Jr. speaking about how those in power will never agree to allow for an “acceptable” or “polite” time to bring up human rights issues and how it has to be fought for.

And there’s a linked Twitter thread on that subreddit that gives some nice insight on how carefully crafted Blizzard’s official response was in order to really avoid apologizing and to not offend China in the process. It just reminds me of how gross that response was.

I’m glad to see people co-opting Blizzard’s characters and IPs to not only highlight Blizzard’s hypocrisy but also make it harder for Blizzard to ignore the issue.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Armsbend

I remember when Activision was considered the bad guy. Now it’s Call of Duty that is holding the light of Liberty high?

Ahhhh to live in simple times again…2017…the good ole’ days.

* games were absolutely terrible in 2017*

Reader
Arktouros

The people who are saying “keep politics out of my (insert thing here)” are all too aware of how politics pervasively shapes every aspect of their lives. You really can’t go anywhere these days without being bombarded with some sort of cultural or political revolution going on.

Imagine you go to watch a movie. While watching that movie someone sitting next to you starts talking about all the suffering that went into the making of that film. Oh this scene is only possible because an unpaid intern slaved away and worked 40 hours straight to make that thing. The director yelled at someone who kept messing up this scene until they broke down and cried. That actor made really creepy remarks to all the women on the set. Then when you tell that person to shut up so you can sit there and actually enjoy the movie they start criticizing you for not caring and not “wanting their suffering to ruin your good time.”

Can’t all that be discussed after the movie? Can’t all that be talked about elsewhere? Can’t we address those concerns in a forum where results could be made? People have lost the entire concept of boundaries.

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

“Imagine you go to watch a movie. While watching that movie someone sitting next to you starts talking about all the suffering that went into the making of that film. Oh this scene is only possible because an unpaid intern slaved away and worked 40 hours straight to make that thing. The director yelled at someone who kept messing up this scene until they broke down and cried. That actor made really creepy remarks to all the women on the set.”

I actually want to know all of that, ASAP. Its all far more important stuff than the film I’m watching. I paid for a ticket – I’m also paying for the suffering of others and the least I can do is learn about that.

deekay_plus
Reader
Patreon Donor
deekay_plus

if you sincerely do want to know that, i suggest doing your due diligence *before* seeing the movie and saving your time and money by staying home.

unless it’s one of those talking movie theatre things. i assume they have those. i mean that’s basically i guess theatres are nowadays anyways, i mean certainly didn’t stop the asshole at the last jedi from sharing his opinions on it loudly for the last 30 minutes. just like the rest of those people shared with ms tran on her socialz. because eVeRyThiNG SHoUld bE pOlItIcAl eVeRyWhErE cOnStAnTly.

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

Sometimes I miss some things. Glad someone is letting me know what I haven’t learned yet.

Reader
Arktouros

I actually want to know all of that, ASAP. Its all far more important stuff than the film I’m watching. I paid for a ticket – I’m also paying for the suffering of others and the least I can do is learn about that.

Again my point is not that these things are unimportant or irrelevant nor that they shouldn’t be learned about. By all means lets learn about about the important suffering of others so we can become more aware.

However there is a time and place for things. Just because you can do something, doesn’t mean you should.

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

I want to know it ASAP.

Reader
Arktouros

Then you and and the person who wish to discuss the suffering that went into the film can do so outside of the movie theater.

People are at the movie theater to watch a movie. Let people watch their movie.

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

I don’t want to have a chat. I want to know ASAP. Basically, I don’t think the talk is appropriate, but I also personally have no disgust, disturbance, or dismissal (etc) if someone came to me. I’d be appreciative and then try to settle down the talk unless it had more directly to do with the theatre itself.

Similar to Blizzcon, I don’t think bumrushing a cosplay competition or whatever is something I can easily support, but if say I was ignorant to the China contreversy, I wouldn’t mind at all if the issue was brought up overall, there were protests in the viscinity, and even if I was made uncomfortable by my presence and monetary contribution to the convention.

I’m gay and semi-regularly attend the local (and regional) pride parades. A couple years ago ours was stalled by BLM protesters. My reaction was pretty neutral – I’m a casual supporter of the cause, and while I thought the exact form and intensity of the disturbance was perhaps risking more backfire than power, I was also happy that people gave more of a damn than me and that there’s less apathetic sorts in the world. If someone breaks up my paid moviegoing, unless they’re an avowed enemy of mine (in which case they get mockery at best, unless their point is pretty airtight), I don’t personally get bothered by the disturbance of my entertainment. I get entertained all the time in my life, and missing out some minutes or an hour over learning something more crucial to society means almost nothing to me.

If people are chattering near me about total trivia, let alone a relevant political topic, I have no fear about letting them know they’re disturbing the experience, but that’s a big difference compared to considering them an opponent of my respect. Those BLMers in the case above? I still like them (even though I think some approaches and beliefs of them can be thoughtless), I’m glad they’re engaged in more righteous radicalism than I can bother with, and with every year I think there’s more reason for them to persist. Was my schedule for the day hampered? Yeah, by like, ten minutes. And my more party-focused attitude shifted to more aggressive politics. But I don’t mind that at all, and consider that usually a good thing.

Reader
Arktouros

Yet a chat is what they’re offering. A non-stop, never ending chat so long as you’re there. Not a heads up. Not a four one one. An endless dialogue. Trivia and facts about the suffering of each scene as the movie progresses. When you let them know they’re disturbing their experience, they hit you with the: “I’m sorry that hearing about their suffering is ruining your good time.”

People go to the movies to watch a movie. People play games to play a game. It shouldn’t be surprising to anyone that when you disrupt that people will get upset. They might even report you to the movie theater to have removed. It doesn’t make the movie theater in league with the suffering nor are they persecuting that person for expressing their opinions. It means someone acted inappropriately for that setting and the people in charge for that setting removed them.

Reader
kvlt_vonnegut

According to those same people, though, there does not exist an “appropriate setting” for them to be reminded of such things.

Reader
Arktouros

As one of those same people there are tons of appropriate settings for such discussions. There’s a variety of social media websites out there to have such discussions on. There’s numerous private discussion areas such as Discord communities and other similar platforms. Comment sections on news or blog articles is fine to discuss them as well.

Reader
aussie_eevee

There is a time and a place for everything. But not now.

deekay_plus
Reader
Patreon Donor
deekay_plus

frankly i’d just like for people to realize that a chat box isn’t a solicitation to propagandize to people.

that maybe if i’m talking about a topic that touches on polidicks and i mention a polidickal eleemnt of the topic as food for thought, i don’t want to be listening to why you think someone accused of rape in highschool is still a good option for supcourt justice or why you think paying your tax bill is theft or how you think climate change isn’t man made or real or this or that polidcks thing 15 minutes later for the next six hours. (idk why climate change is a polidicks thing. it’s a science thing, stop politicizing scientific facts you fucks)

and i find the people that i find myself in those situations over the years are absolutely beast mode about steering the conversation there and doubling down on the polidickal segue from the original topics even with attempts to resteer.

gets tiresome because invariably they get offended by my staunch liberal beliefs in things like individual right sand responsibilities, the role of government in society for the sake of social welfare of the nation and it’s citizens and the government’s role in regulating and guiding the market. rights like habeas corpus due process and so on and so forth that are the very basis of our freedoms and prosperity in society.

because even though these are the guiding principles of western freedom, apparently people get quite upset by them nowadays and prefer to trade in their patriotism and freedoms and prosperity for unwarranted loyalty to foreign belligerents run by oligarchies and feudal lords.

Reader
Bruno Brito

You can stay at home.

Reader
Arktouros

That advice also works both ways.

The difference being I’m not trying to go to a place where people are doing something, such as watching a movie, and trying to disrupt them from doing so. It’s a reasonable expectation to go to a movie and expect to watch it without someone yammering at you the entire movie. Equally it’s reasonable to expect to log in to play a video game and not to be bombarded with politics and other garbage.

As deekay put perfectly below, a chat box isn’t an invitation for propaganda.

Reader
Bruno Brito

Imagine you go to watch a movie. While watching that movie someone sitting next to you starts talking about all the suffering that went into the making of that film. Oh this scene is only possible because an unpaid intern slaved away and worked 40 hours straight to make that thing. The director yelled at someone who kept messing up this scene until they broke down and cried. That actor made really creepy remarks to all the women on the set. Then when you tell that person to shut up so you can sit there and actually enjoy the movie they start criticizing you for not caring and not “wanting their suffering to ruin your good time.”

Your analogy was weak. Let me try a better one.

Imagine you go watch a movie.

While watching the movie, someone barges into the room, screaming that people are in the dark of the room, taking people with chloroform and placing them into armored trucks, to take them over state lines and sell them in prostitution or trafficking. One specific scene shows the director of the movie bitchslapping everyone in the office, doing aggressive moves against the women, which would constitute clear sexual harassment, and someone points out this is actually a correct overview of how this movie was made. Instead of yelling, the director got into a fist fight with one of his actors and sent them to the hospital.

When the workforce went to the producers to complain, they realized most of them were pro-directors, and even some of his own family.

Here’s the problem with your analogy: What’s happening in HK is not yelling and people breaking down. Is trafficking, is dictatorship, is murder. This is NOT a situation where you pretend nothing is happening or wait after the movie just so your ass is safe from a conscience crisis.

————————–

That advice also works both ways.

It doesn’t. Protests are public by definition. You went out to a public place to be at peace, yet other people raging war irritates you. So, stay at home. You stay at home for peaceful solitude, but those who protest, go out exactly to fight against the same placated conformist you’re going for.

Don’t expect you will shutdown voices with that weak argument. You won’t. And again, the situation in Hong Kong is not mere crying and nervous breakdown. It’s literally mass control, and it’s way more urgent than what you trying to say.

Reader
Arktouros

My analogy was fine. Yours…Conflating the situation that’s going on in Hong Kong and people not liking political discussions in their various forms of entertainment is just objectively wrong and entirely misleading. For just one example of this most people who say they don’t want politics in their X generally are referring to any situation in general be it human rights, cultural conflicts, or actual politics.

Again this has to do with the issue that people see a method of communication and an audience and immediately see these as a soap box to espouse whatever cause they feel strongly about. It is inappropriate and disrespectful to use these things in this manner. A movie theater is not an appropriate place to discuss the suffering that went into the making of the movie being displayed.

A privately owned movie theater is not in the public. You are on private property owned by a business who’s there to sell tickets to watch entertainment products. You want to protest outside of the movie theater in response to the suffering that went on that film by all means go ahead. That’s your right to do so, and I support you having that right. However I do not support and will never support people abusing every opportunity they possibly have to shout their propaganda and message. The idea you can ignore societal norms because you feel you have morality on your side is absurd.

I have not once brought up or ever talked about the situation in Hong Kong beyond saying I am not talking about it because it’s a complicated situation.

Reader
Bruno Brito

My analogy was fine.

No, it wasn’t.

The idea you can ignore societal norms because you feel you have morality on your side is absurd.

Revolutions are exactly that, you dork. They’re the break of the status quo because of a moral outlook that changes because of repeated oppresion.

You don’t make revolutions peacefully. Those do not happen. They don’t exist. Period. It’s not in humanity’s history.

Yours…Conflating the situation that’s going on in Hong Kong and people not liking political discussions in their various forms of entertainment is just objectively wrong and entirely misleading.

Oh, puh-lease. You’ve been on this apologetic crusade for a while now, and it’s disconcerting that you can put you own lofty cusheoned ideals over literal lives being wasted in deafening roars. Your analogy was downplaying what an attempt at revolution is, one that goes against literal tyranny, and yet here you are, abusing the same argument you’re against, talking all this crap to me.

Since we’re talking about voices and mouths moving, why don’t you bite me?

Reader
Arktouros

No, it wasn’t.

Yes it was. Everyone else seems to be keeping up quite fine. That’s because we’re comparing like things of discussing politics in video games to politics in movies as opposed to you who wants to compare talking about politics in video games to the Hong Kong revolution which makes absolutely no fucking sense at all.

Revolutions are exactly that, you dork. They’re the break of the status quo because of a moral outlook that changes because of repeated oppresion.

No one is trying to revolt and overthrow their government from inside a fucking video game. What’s going on in Hong Kong is a revolution. You throwing out a diatribe on how you disagree with the latest Trump debacle in World Chat in a video game is an annoyance at best.

I don’t apologize for anyone or anything. I explain things the way they are or why things are the way they are. If you want to change them, by all means go right ahead. However if you think you’re going to do anything from inside a game the only thing you’re playing is yourself.

Reader
Bruno Brito

I don’t apologize for anyone or anything.

Congratulations on leading your life like that.

I’m done with you, Apologetic Superman.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Patreon Donor
Loyal Patron
Ashfyn Ninegold

Imagine you go to a movie and it’s about the world being besieged by evil aliens who want to enslave humanity in order to make themselves more powerful. A bunch of guys in funny clothes with weird personality twitches join together to combat them. They have no chance of winning.

What do you do? Stand up and shout at the screen: Keep politics out of my movies?

Reader
Arktouros

What do you do? Stand up and shout at the screen: Keep politics out of my movies?

There’s a huge difference between going to see a movie with political themes for entertainment purposes and someone sitting down next to you in the theater and trying to chat you up on their thoughts about a topic or a group coming in and blocking the bottom portion of the screen in a human chain holding up signs about some other issue.

I don’t even understand why the difference there needs to be explained but this always comes up.

Reader
aussie_eevee

Politics has no effect on my life. Never has.

There is a time and a place for everything. A video game tournament is not the right time or place for a political revolution.

Reader
Bruno Brito

Politics has no effect on my life. Never has.

You’re kidding yourself. The fact that your country doesn’t live under a tyrannical rule means you’re allowed to speak such in a forum of public opinion in the internet, and you don’t need to cross the Great Firewall to say so.

That’s how politics has a effect on your life. As it has on everyone’s life.

Reader
Minimalistway

Can they protest silicon valley too? they should do that for the big three: Google, Apple and Facebook.

Reader
JBNL

you missed Amazon there.

Reader
starbuck1771

And IBM

Reader
Minimalistway

That will be a long walk from Anaheim to Seattle :-)

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Armsbend

What’s the protest? A protest against success?

Reader
Arktouros

Seems more like a protest against Globalization to me.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Armsbend

The problem with that is by weakening our strongest tech companies we are only allowing their competitors to take their place. Our tech companies make every other country seethe with anger and jealousy. See: EU suing to prop up their own terrible, subservient minds and innovation.

Reader
Arktouros

Oh, I know. However you get one company who bans a player after using it as a platform for their political statement and everyone goes full on meme Liberty Prime mode.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Armsbend

You can do that here – so I sure as heck would enjoy watching people constantly bash China – in deeply more and more personal ways. Just for the lols. They get so very very worked up when people say mean things about them. I think it’s hilarious.

Reader
rosieposie

If your tech companies could pay at least some of what they are due in taxes that’d be cool, thanks. But I guess they are too successful to do that, amirite?

Smithwicks
Reader
Smithwicks

Hey those giant corporations employ a lot of people to find and exploit every loophole of taxation available. Want more tax revenue? Remove the loopholes some politician(s) left in to help some donor out.

Reader
John Kiser

If we are going to protest companies with chinese involvement might as well just protest every single US company in existence in some fashion.

Reader
rafael12104

As I said earlier. I’m not missing a thing this year. Heh.

Brack’s message helped a little. And as others have already pointed out, if Blizz comes out and gives the players what they want, Diablo IV on the PC for example, most of the nerddom will give them a pass.

But I also do think there will be some disruptions. Now, the question is, how will they handle it? Because given Blizz’s track record with PR over the last couple of years, this could be the perfect storm of debacles. Player vs. Dev meta to its highest degree!