Elder Scrolls Online doxxing drama ends with one partnered streamer booted

It's a Dempster fire

    
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The Elder Scrolls Online community has been abuzz this weekend over an incident that rocked the game’s streaming crew. According to streamer Inklings, who posted about it this morning, a partnered streamer was alleged to have doxxed multiple people (including a minor), leaking real names, employers, social media, characters, and more, spreading this information among other streamers in a Google doc until a developer stepped in to pull it down. A bit of digging made it clear that the document had been created and initially posted privately by streamer Kyle Dempster.

We reached out to ZeniMax and Bethsoft this morning for a statement; a few hours later, the team tweeted confirmation about the doxx attempt as well as the news that it had “removed an individual from the ESO Stream Team” for a “serious violation” of the game’s code of conduct.

Dempster initially said on Twitter that he was resigning from the streaming group because ZeniMax was “failing to take action” against the people he says were harassing him. A second statement made this afternoon acknowledged that he put the document together, saying that it was a compilation of information about the “trolls” he says were harassing him and sending him death threats; he claims he created the document to share with the studio and the police but that he was asked to post it for the group. He then alleges that someone in the group – either a fellow streamer or ZeniMax employee – leaked it to the broader community. Here’s the entirety of his Twitter statement:

“Hi everyone, a quick update regarding Twitter today: I used the early part of the day researching who may have breached ZOS NDA to release the names and other information floating around Twitter regarding the alleged doxxing. I am 100% against disclosing this kind of information to the public, and me sharing with the ESO team was in confidence at the request of a member. It is unacceptable that an ESO stream team partner or ZOS employee shared that kind of information outside of that server. The information in the document was aggregated from the trolls public accounts they used to harass me and send death threats. This information that leaked was provided to ZOS and the SLC PD. It was not sent to any private individuals. We took the action of deleting the document as soon as we learned someone had leaked it. I am so sorry that a member of that team broke confidence and made that information public. No one deserves that kind of treatment, and the information they shared could have been very dangerous. If you know or have any leads regarding who shared this information on Twitter, please let me know. The police would very much like to get a hold of that person. At this time, we are working to determine the party in question. Please at this time do not conduct further witch hunts against any employee or community member. If you have a lead on this, please reach out to me privately. I am again so sorry to anyone involved.”

A bit of sleuthing reveals that Dempster had been heavily criticized by members of the community for an allegedly sexually inappropriate comment he made toward another player earlier this month; the list of personal information presumably belonged to those critics. In any case, it appears that ZeniMax has weighed in and put an end to the scuffle, to the cheers of ESO players on Twitter.

This particular spectacle comes just as Twitch is undergoing a major crackdown on problematic streamers – the biggest among them being Dr Disrespect.

MOP’s Ben Griggs contributed to this report.

Source: Twitter

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Java Jawa

People need to be held accountable for what they say and do. Back a few decades ago, it was common practice that the notion of thinking twice before speaking was instilled in people.

Now folks thinking they are anonymous just because we have the internet, well . . . . not so much the case.

I always through of the podcaster as quite articulated , so whatever happens I hope it’ll be a lesson and consequence people will not forget.

How many wake up calls do we need every week?

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McGuffn

It isn’t the interenet and it isn’t anonymity, and it doesn’t have to be anonymity if you think you can get away with it. (Some) people are just garbage.

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Bruno Brito

Back a few decades ago, it was common practice that the notion of thinking twice before speaking was instilled in people.

Someone should tell that to my father.

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Nathan Aldana

I mean. it was a common practice. but only for certain skin colors who;d get lynched for speaking their minds.

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Bruno Brito

Yeah. I don’t know if it’s a cultural thing in the US, but this thing that “when i was young people were more respectful” is complete bullshit here. We always had violent police officers, corpses being dumped on the roadside, people being overall assholes to each other and such. It never changed.

If much, i’m feeling that we’re being way more empathic now, because we’re treating mental health as something serious and not just “crazy talk”.

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Robert Mann

Not so much, honestly. It really hasn’t been common practice for a long time. At least, in the circles of people who will do these things if given the chance. It remains common practice among some people who are less… harsh toward others under most circumstances.

The only thing that has ever mitigated this behavior is consequence. We don’t really have big consequences for being an asshat in society, so asshats thrive and multiply.

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Jeremy Barnes

” Back a few decades ago, it was common practice that the notion of thinking twice before speaking was instilled in people.”

Ahh, the good ole days fallacy…because you didn’t hear about it doesn’t mean people were ‘better’ in the past. The only difference is exposure..

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Bryan Correll

So…..a cyber-Karen.

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Utakata

…I think they might be Kyle’s. >.<

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Utakata

“Let me show the world why they call me Dr. Disrespect!!”

/bleh

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Raidervc

Between the toxicity of Dr. Disrespect, the doxxing and pathetic man-child half-apology by this Kyle guy , and plenty of other instances of streamer abuse, I can’t help but wish for a change in gamer culture away from putting these people in influential positions. I know it won’t happen because they’re essentially cheap marketing platforms, but like, come on. Gamer culture has an underlying toxicity and misogyny problem, and enabling white male streamers seems to bring out those sides of them.

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Rndomuser

enabling white male streamers

This is a false generalization because there is plenty of toxicity from streamers with different ethnicities and different genders, I can quickly find examples and post here but I don’t think it would be appropriate. You are also making a false generalization that all “white male streamers” have toxic and misogynic sides in them. Please don’t make such generalizations.

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Loopy

enabling white male streamers seems to bring out those sides of them

Lost me there. The gamer culture absolutely needs to change, but statements like these are not helping in any way.

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Utakata

Depending whether the OP is referring to “enabling” as “privilege unchecked”…as that’s how I read it.

But still, it’s not a word or term I would of used in addressing this issue. There are far better ways of phrasing that, without sounding like one wants to banhammer a certain segment of the population based on gender and race in the process.

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Arktouros

There are far too many examples of diverse (racially, gendered and even culturally as in from around the globe) successful content creators to really even consider the idea of “privilege unchecked” being a thing. If you’re entertaining and can find an audience you’re able to make it on the platform.

The inherent problem that always rears it’s head is what people find entertaining as there’s a great deal of people of all genders and races who have built their platform on the “shock jock” platform of behaving in toxic ways because behaving in such a way built their audience and made them successful. If there’s a demand for something someone will find a way to meet it.

Trying to play all this off like it’s purely a “white male” thing shows an ignorance of the platform and the other people on it.

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Utakata

It’s a thing though. /shrug

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Rndomuser

I didn’t follow with ESO drama but the situation with DrDisrespect is pretty interesting. There are a lot of signs that he might be banned for sexual harassment – there has been several streamers who were already banned for this very recently and he is known to not be a very faithful person, people who watch him know he cheated on his wife because he admitted it and there are claims by his former mod that he cheated on his wife with multiple women.

Someone might say “but this information would be known by now”, which is not necessarily true because the person who was sexually harassed might not be willing to share this in public to protect the identity and Twitch does not comment on specific reasons for bans even for streamers who were banned for sexual harassment.

There are some people who assume he was banned for breaching the contract because he wants to switch platforms from Twitch to some other service. This does not make sense because if that was true – he would just say this already on Twitter instead of making posts like “Twitch has not told me yet why they banned me”. And Discord would also not remove partnership from him, Discord does not care on which platform you stream or if you stream at all, there are Partnered servers for various communities where server owners do not stream anything. Only reason Discord would remove partnership if the server owner did something bad to some person or allowed something illegal to be posted and someone reported that to Discord with plenty of evidence, and Discord does require a lot of evidence, I know because I reported some people for questionable content before.

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Arktouros

I think Linus from Linus Tech Tips had an interesting view in that with the collapse of Mixer the Twitcher platform is rather emboldened by lack of competition anymore. Streamers aren’t going to go to Facebook because of the rep Facebook generally has in gaming communities (and facing it’s own backlash of problems there). I certainly would never watch or stream on Facebook. Equally YouTube is just kinda there, good to some people, but also like the backup video platform for a lot of content. Streaming on YouTube would be throwing all your eggs in one basket and if you get banned on there you lose video content and streaming content which is very risky.

Will be interesting to see if we hear the details of what happened with people like Doc. Right now there’s a lot of speculation, but big named streamers have gotten away with a lot of stuff before. While Doc certainly has “the bathroom incident” many other streamers also have inappropriate incidents like that, multiple in many cases, but remain on the platform. This makes me think something more actually happened and they’re not just cleaning house.

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TomTurtle

A little bit confusing to keep track of what was going on, but makes more sense after reading here and some Twitter replies.

I watched his stream for a bit a while back so this was surprising to read about. Sounds like he’s just digging a hole deeper and deeper for himself.

Doxxing is freaking scary. I feel so bad for those who were targeted.

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squid

I’ll never understand streaming.

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Loopy

It’s entertainment for gamers. The popular ones usually have a specific personality that is appealing to the audience, and coupled with high skill in specific games, it becomes an interesting watch.

Imagine if you could watch your favourite athlete live on camera, while practicing some really cool techniques, and also have the ability to talk to them directly? Or if you’re into music, imagine being able to watch your favourite band live every day while they’re performing on camera, and have the ability to have a full on conversation with them in the process. It’s the same for gamers.

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Robert Mann

From what you just described… I don’t get it. It’s just not appealing. Maybe a pure comedy routine if it was done well, but the interaction level is nowhere near sufficient to cause interest, watching those things might be of note if practicing yourself but otherwise would bore me quickly into doing something instead, and the entire idea people have of getting famous or with these people is a fantasy with worse odds than playing the lottery.

I remain of the position that is best called the “But why?” position.

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Loopy

Like i said, it’s entertainment. Not every type of entertainment is for everyone. Some people enjoy soap operas, and i just can’t get into it. Some folks like skilled players memeing around on streams, and it’s appealing to them.

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Mr.McSleaz

Is Doxxing a Crime?
If not, It should be.

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Loopy

Then Google will get shut down. The act of doxxing is simply collecting all of publicly (albeit obscure) available information on a person and then packaging it up.

While the act of doxxing is not illegal, using that information to threaten, harrass, or do other illegal activities is obviously illegal in itself.

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Arktouros

If I’m not mistaken most companies will ask your permission to gather and use the data and most people simply blindly give away everything.

I doubt it’s illegal to doxx someone if the information is publicly available, more just considered a dick move purely for the purpose of harassment.

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Brazen Bondar

As Loopy says, doxxing itself is not a crime. And using the information to harass may not be a crime depending on where you live and how that jurisdiction defines harassment. Last year there were a couple of proposals in Congress to address this issue, but there is no traction on them at the moment.

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StarkeRealm

Kyle Dempster has a response on twitter: https://twitter.com/kyledempsterstu/status/1276982140979212288

Ben Griggs
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Ben Griggs

Block quotes, above

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StarkeRealm

How did I not see this? D’oh.