Temtem banned 900 cheaters, then changed its mind on granting appeals

    
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Apparently, Temtem has borrowed a bit more from Pokemon than just its overall vibe: It’s also borrowing the elder franchise’s reputation for attracting the cheaty cheatersons of the world. Early this morning, Crema announced that it had banned 900 players permanently for intentionally cheating and/or exploiting in the early access MMO. Controversy erupted, however, over the studio’s plans to refuse appeals.

“We just completed our first batch of banned users. Almost 900 players have been permanently banned from Temtem. Bans are final, we won’t answer or review any ban appeal. We’ve made 100% sure that every banned user is either a cheater or has abused exploits intentionally. […] The team spent all morning checking banned accounts and player accounts saying ‘they didn’t do anything illegal’. We re-checked over 100 accounts. Every single one of them was a legit ban. […] Don’t trust cheaters. They just want to know more info about the ban in order to avoid it next time they’re using cheats. They will lie about everything in order to get more info and the minimal possibility of getting unbanned.”

But hours later, Crema apparently reversed that decision, citing players’ feedback.

The situation recalls one of the larger MMO cheating messes of the last few years: In 2018, ArenaNet banned a wave of Guild Wars 2 players it claimed it had identified as cheaters, using what players characterized as invasive cheat-detection spyware. But in January of 2019, a determined player in Europe was able to successfully invoke GDPR to force ArenaNet to turn over his data, which he then used to clear his name and force reinstatement and compensation for others who had been demonstrably wrongly accused and banned.

Of course, that’s no guarantee any of the 900 people banned will be cleared and reinstated in Temtem, only a reminder that studios make mistakes too.

Source: Twitter

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NeoWolf

It should be noted they also tweeted to say they have not undone ANY of the bans so far as the reviews they did confirmed they were ALL legitimate bans so far, and all banned for good reason.

I should imagine there will be few if any undone at all

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kgptzac

To be fair though, taking the GW2 example, ANet likely have reviewed that guy’s ban and didn’t find out about abut the empty file hash silliness, and needed to have the player to point out before switch to “i’m sorry” mode. In the end it’s either you trust the company, or you don’t.

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NeoWolf

Noone gets it right 100% of the time but i’d still be more inclined to trust the company when it comes to dealing with cheaters than players own recognisance to act “right” because we know they don’t.
There are ALWAYS those who seek to abuse, or manipulate anything and any system to their own advantage irrespective of the damage it causes others.

I mean noone gets banned for finding an exploit or loophole of some sort or using one by accident, they only get banned for repeatedly doing so to their own benefit. And we’ve ALL seen examples of those people in games of all genres time and again and they all have one thing in common, they don’t care. To them what they do is justifiable simply because they could do it to begin with. Their logic is as broken and misguided as their morals.

The people for whom such situations are false positives or legitimate mistakes are few and far between in comparison and that is what reviews are for and intended to identify, which is what these guys are doing, which is great.

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Robert Mann

I do think companies need to be prepared to back themselves up with proof for such things. There’s a huge problem with cheating in games, so it HAS to be addressed, but there is also always that problem of false positives without sufficient verification or detective work.

Empty hashes like in the GW2 case might prompt something like an invisible GM recording on follow, to see what they catch, as one idea… but should never be assumed cheating in and of themselves. They could be a cheater using tricks to avoid anti-cheat detections, or it could be a legitimate file location on lock, especially if it is checking all running programs for program identification. Expecting that to pan out otherwise is asking for customers to vanish due to a lack of security on their end.

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oldandgrumpy

Like the GM moving my character at the crafting table in EQ2 to see what would happen :)

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JBNL

“to err is human, to forgive not company policy”

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Dean Dean

“Sorry I accidentally cheated on purpose! I won’t do it again, I swear!”