Casually Classic: What if you don’t want to raid in WoW Classic Burning Crusade?

    
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If I had to sum up what my WoW Classic guild is doing in these first few weeks of Burning Crusade, it would be “racing to 70, gearing up, and pushing hard to get attuned for raids.” Within days of the launch, we had multiple 70s and people regularly announcing some sort of attunement progress or purple item looted.

Meanwhile, there are those of us still plodding on through Hellfire Peninsula and even the old world with our alts, very much feeling left in the dust of this race. Because a race it is, as World of Warcraft has long since drilled into our heads that getting to raids in the be-all, end-all nadir of the game experience. It’s where all the best purps are at and where people can start to have fun or something.

And for those who are on the raid progression track — hey, have fun! I absolutely mean that. Enjoy yourself and maintain a healthy balance in your gaming life. But raiding is not my goal nor why I showed up to play Burning Crusade. In a real way, I – and other casuals like me – are kicking against WoW’s raid-minded design team, electing to eschew this focus to pursue our own fun.

So what if you don’t want to raid in Burning Crusade? What are we going to do over the next two years?

Speaking for myself here, I’m going to enjoy this expansion at my own pace without giving into the (thankfully dwindling) FOMO of attunements, gearing, and raiding. I haven’t really gone through Burning Crusade in a decade, and I want to experience these quests and zones without feeling like I need to be pushing hard through them. Giving yourself permission to not rush is a blissful thing indeed and something that I try to do in all of my MMOs.

So when you slow down, you find that you have a whole lot more expansion to enjoy than those that devour the bulk of the solo questing content in a week. My priority is simply to level up my two characters — a Warlock and a Shaman — to 70 primarily through questing with the odd dungeon run here and there. Making sure to explore all of the quests means that I’ll be reaping some pretty great gear — occasionally pre-raid best-in-slot stuff — just from doing what I like to do.

At level 70, it’ll become about finishing up those quests, maybe doing more dungeon runs, and accumulating enough gold to buy my flying mounts (regular and epic). I’ve also been diving more into crafting in Classic than I have in retail, and that gives me another alternative objective to pursue.

There are plenty of dailies and reputation tracks out there with a lot of even longer-term goals, although I’m going to be pickier about engaging with those due to how much I got burned out of them back in the day.

It might also be fun and beneficial to pursue some old Azeroth class quests and solo dungeon runs to wrap things up. And let’s not forget alts, which might help to occupy that second year of Burning Crusade Classic as we wait for Wrath.

And who knows? Eventually when raiding attunements are dropped and everyone can Kara to their heart’s content, I might be up for a few casual runs. Just because I’m not raid-crazy doesn’t mean I hate them, simply that they’re not where the fun is at in WoW for me.

So I’ll turn it over to you: What if you don’t want to raid in Burning Crusade? I’d love to hear what you’re looking to accomplish and experience in this expansion.

Stepping back into the MMO time machine of WoW Classic, Justin Olivetti offers up observations and ground-level analysis as a Gnome with a view. Casually Classic is a more laid-back look at this legacy ruleset for those of us who’ve never stepped into a raid or seen more than 200 gold to our names.
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Nathan Aldana

Honestly this is a major reason why both wow and wow classic have issues retaining my interest these days. I have pretty much zero interest in wow;s idea of endgame and so once I get there I quickly burn out

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Tamanous

I feel the same. My Classic days are done, and private/classic wow has been my primary game over the last 4-5 years. The entire reason why is came into existence is because players were tired of the direction Blizzard took in Wow’s development for the masses instead of the genre. They are repeating all of their previous mistakes and not learning anything from this experience.

I went from being hyped for TBC to losing all interest. I’ll never go back to any version of Wow. Despite the nearly insurmountable odds of successful indie mmorpg development, I will only ever support those ventures. Corporate run games are dead to me.

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Drewski Brewski

My best bud and I rolled a priest/pally combo and we decided only to run dungeons with real life friends. We often end up 3-manning dungeons because not everyone is around but it’s been a great challenge and the most fun I’ve ever had in wow. I’m never going back to grouping with toxic randos let alone raiding.

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Motherball

I haven’t raided seriously since Molten Core and don’t really subscribe to the whole idea of “endgame,” especially since voice chat has become mandatory. No thanks.

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angrakhan

So I’ll turn it over to you: What if you don’t want to raid in Burning Crusade?

Then prepare to be treated like a second class citizen like in every other WoW expansion? I dunno. I’m not exactly unbiased since I’m done with raiding in general and WoW raiding in particular until I’m an empty-nester, retired or both. Ask me again in a decade or so.

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aYates

I for one don’t feel that I’m treated like a second class citizen for not raiding. I don’t get this whole anti-raiding attitude.
If you want more sandbox/housing/open world pvp, etc. then yeah, WoW’s prob not the best game for you.
I wish WoW had housing, like we all do LOL …but, I still get a lot out of the world exploration, quests, working on trade-skills and just running around killing stuff to enjoy my time playing.

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Bruno Brito

I for one don’t feel that I’m treated like a second class citizen for not raiding.

Good for you. It won’t change the fact that your class is designed for how it performs in raiding, and it’s entire balance revolves around it. The entire game besides dungeoneering and raiding is a busted piece of shit.

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aYates

So, how do you really feel?? lol
Fair enough. You aren’t a fan. That’s fine.
But, many people enjoy the game for what it is.
I think it’s a little silly to criticize a “Classic” version of a game for being it’s “Classic” self, but to each their own.
Now, retail WoW is another story. I think there’s a lot to discuss about how retail WoW could learn from past mistakes and be a much better game.

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Bruno Brito

So, how do you really feel?? lol
Fair enough. You aren’t a fan. That’s fine.

You do realize that what i said was a Bellular’s quote, right? He himself called the game a perpetual beta, said that all the group content was fine and the rest of it was busted and said that Roleplayers have the best time in WoW because they’re not forced to play the game under the devs chains.

I was a fan of WoW for the past 10 years. I played it for 10 years.

I can absolutely be not a fan of a game that had the same design choices for almost two decades and the only thing that changed around the years was the reliance on Borrowed Power.

If you don’t raid in TBC you’ll get to a point where your character is capped and can’t do anything because there isn’t anything to do. WoW always lacked laterality and made up for it with geargrind in massive raids. The moment we started complaining about needing more progression and getting that, was the moment people realized that this game funneled players into raiding because it has absolutely nothing else going for it.

At least Everquest forces you into a leveling process that takes months. And all that doesn’t even get to the issue of WoW classes being designed with raiding in mind.

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aYates

I hope you find a game you like.
In the meantime…some of us will be having fun in WoW Classic and talking about that here..

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Bruno Brito

I have games i like.

That won’t change the fact i can absolutely talk about WoW being the biggest MMO and Blizzard being incapable of directing it to a good place.

It’s insanity if you think the game can’t be criticized just because you like it and have fun.

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aYates

You can criticize, of course. It’s just silly because this is an old game that they brought back. They’re not going to redesign it to your liking. But, complain away…

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Schmidt.Capela

I don’t get this whole anti-raiding attitude.

Why should I bother with a game that includes raiding if I will never, ever, raid again? It throws regular balance out of whack, attracts narcissists and over-competitive jerks, prevents me from playing through large parts of the game’s content or seeing parts of the story, and so on; in other words, promoting raiding makes the game far, far less enjoyable for non-raiders like me. It’s much better to play games that don’t have raiding, or at least put far less importance on raiding than WoW does.

Caveat: I played WoW from Vanilla to WotLK (and enough of Cataclysm to decide WoW wasn’t for me anymore). I even tried raiding during WotLK (which is how I decided to never raid again; it was a miserable experience despite my regular raid team beating the content and being full of nice people, and fully nailed home how broken the balance was due to raiding as my raid-geared character could clear 5-man lv80 open world content by merely auto-attacking). And I enjoyed my time in the game, in large part due to WoW being among the most casual MMOs out there despite the “raid-or-die” mentality. I’m not really willing to go back, though, because the market evolved and there are other options nowadays that capture much of what I liked about WoW, BC, and WotLK without trying to force me into the kind of organized large group content that I really dislike doing in my free time.

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aYates

It sounds like a not enough time issue. I get that. But, WoW retail has LFR and much faster dungeon running for casuals.
I don’t think it’s realistic to expect to be able to attain all the best gear/stuff in a game without having the time to invest into it. I personally don’t mind walking around in lesser gear than the person who plays hours n hours more than me. I think it’s a balancing act for the devs and really impossible for them to make everybody happy.
Definitely harsher for casual players in Classic, but I think that’s just part of the whole experience of it.

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angrakhan

Yeah I never said I expected to get all the best gear on a casual schedule. You said that. However that disparity is what makes casual players feel like second class citizens in both classic and retail.

Funny thing is there’s a solution for it. It wouldn’t be appropriate for classic but they could look at it for retail. Namely they could borrow from Destiny 2. The way content works there is you have your gear score and mobs have theirs. If your gear score is less than theirs then you do reduced damage and I believe they do bonus damage, but I could be wrong on the latter. If your gear score is equal to or higher than the mobs gear score then you do 100% damage to them. Having greater than 100% does not confer bonus damage. PvP damage is normalized across the board and it doesn’t matter your level or gear score.

This means that a raider in maxed end game gear doesn’t do any more damage than a casual in normal open world activities or dungeon runs or pvp. They do, however, do more damage than a casual in raids, but if the casual doesn’t care about doing raids, then that disparity doesn’t affect or even matter to the casual because they can run shoulder to shoulder with the raider in all other content.

This is treating casuals as first class citizens and it’s why I will spend money on Destiny 2 or any other game that adopts a similar model any day over WoW.

In WoW the game is designed such that the raider is king of all content to the point that if a casual ends up in a dungeon run with a geared up raider the casual will wonder why they even showed up. A raid geared tank will out dps the dps and probably out heal the healer while they’re at it. The disparity is so vast as to be absurd. I don’t have time for it and Blizzard clearly doesn’t have time for me, so in mutual agreement (I assume as I didn’t actually ask) we have decided to part ways for the foreseeable future. I will spent what little time I have and the portion of the money I make which I have budgeted for gaming on companies that actually give a crap about my business.

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aYates

Okay. This is definitely a raid-centric game. It’s an old game they brought back by popular demand. They’re not going to redesign it, rebuild it to fit your tastes. Sorry. Never going to happen.
It’s like complaining about Black Desert being a PvP game with not enough PvE content. Pointless.

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notReginald VelJohnson

I’ve played on and off since 2006 and I can think of perhaps two or three times that someone treated me poorly for this reason.

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aYates

I’m not planning on raiding other than some random pug, if I’ve got a wild hair sometime.
My endgame will be finishing all the zones/quests/rep/etc. and selling flasks to the raiders. Plus, I want to farm that Dragonfly pet to sell after I gots mine!

Fisty
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Fisty

My long term goals are to work on leveling up engineering to get the cool mount. Work on the rep grinds, get some cool mounts that way. ie the Cenarion hippogriff or Netherdrake. After all that is done, I’m probably done. I’m actually taking a break right now and going through ESO Greymoor content.