seed

* The first game by this name sunsetted in 2006
* The second, by Klang Games, is still in development

Pre-alpha colony sim MMO Seed will grant players the tools to fight toxicity

Seed resurfaced this summer after intensive work by studio Klang Games building out the colony simulation MMO (plus a big influx of investor money), and this month, it’s put together a handy Q&A featuring questions from its community and fresh answers from the devs.

Notably, Klang says that players will be able to password-protect their colonies to invite friends as well as join colonies with open borders; there will be a whole-planet view; and your bank account will move with you if you move colonies (though objects need to move physically). The studio is also working with a Harvard law professor on government structures available to players, with the intent that players “be able to implement laws to fight against toxic behavior.”

“To make this game genuinely scalable, we have to give virtuous players just as many gameplay tools as delinquent players,” the studio explains.

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Betawatch: Camelot Unchained reaches the green fields of beta (August 3, 2018)

Someone break out the “It’s Happening” image, because Camelot Unchained has entered its beta testing at long last! Yes, ti may have been delayed several times, but it’s still made that all-important leap to beta. Good work, Camelot Unchained! We’re all super proud of you.

In other beta news, there’s a bullet list. It’s coming right for us!

All of that sounds fun! This is fun. It’s a fun industry. Why not have some fun checking out our list down below, or letting us know if something is marked incorrectly down in the comments? That means we can fix that up, which is also fun.

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Seed gives its first development update since January

Hot on the heels of its pre-alpha teaser, the sandbox space colony MMO Seed is celebrating the progress that it has made in 2018 to date. The team put out its first developer update since January, and almost all of it is very good news indeed.

The studio creating the game has “almost doubled” in its size over this year and secured $8.95 million in funding. It’s putting those resources to good use, working on projects such as Seedling AI, different world biomes, modular building, a combat prototype, the next iteration of character models, and overall quality.

The team also played around with… ants? “During this time we created Mocktown™, our elaborate ant colony. Where we readjusted our focus to concentrate on the overall picture and by removing various elements, we were able to focus on the simulation from a broader perspective and not lose ourselves in minor detail. This experiment both shed light on a bunch of issues and revealed both technical and design questions which we’re currently working our way through.”

Source: Seed

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Chinese MMO company NetEase invests $50M into SpatialOS MMO platform

Improbable’s SpatialOS is moving on up in the world: The company announced this week that China’s NetEase has invested $50 million to acquire a “small equity stake to act as strategic investment” in the company. And that’s not just casual money; NetEase is apparently planning on developing multiple games using SpatialOS, the first of which is expected to be revealed later in 2018.

“We are recruiting and establishing a presence able to support game developers of all types within China who wish to use SpatialOS, and actively seeking other ­­partners in Asia,” Improbable says. “The investment will increase our ability to help game makers in China and beyond to build previously impossible games, by helping game makers to benefit from a neutral, openly available technology platform supporting the next generation of online gaming.”

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Colony simulation MMO Seed blasts you into space in its brand-new pre-alpha teaser

We’ve been keeping an eye on Klang Games’ MMO Seed since at least last year, when the studio revealed its single-shard simulation mechanics and use of SpatialOS. It looks as if the game is making some progress, as Klang has a fresh blog post up today with a “teaser” of the game’s current pre-alpha build.

The video shows tiny colony vessels shooting out from earth and setting up camp on other worlds as the humans spread out and build civilization from scratch, from tents to villages to big cities across the new planets. It’s cute and might remind you of a cross between The Sims and Spore, in an EVE Online-like setting, which won’t surprise you as its founders have CCP Games pedigrees.

The company further announced today that it’s raised another $8.95M in Series A investor funding, bringing its total investment to $13.95M.

As of autumn last year, external testing was planned for this summer; it’s not clear whether that’s been delayed or this teaser is a precursor to a test. A few months ago, the devs “no comment”-ed on the topic of release.

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E3 2018: Bill Roper on gaming’s smoke and mirrors, Worlds Adrift, and building on SpatialOS

For MMO players, Improbable brought some interesting ideas to GDC this past spring. It also brought some games I wasn’t expecting, and the ones I was expecting were kind of downplayed. On the ground floor, developers from some of our favorite MMOs hadn’t heard of SpatialOS, a platform that allows games to be “bigger” by running multiple game engines in an innovative way, with a few developers being exceptions. I was set up for a meeting with Improbable CCO Bill Roper to help figure things out, but soon into our physical meeting he was pulled away and we had to follow up with emails, which rarely goes as well.

Fortunately, Roper had time to sit and chat again with me at E3. With SpatialOS’s first game out in the wild and more on the way, I felt like there was a lot Roper could explain about SpatialOS, MMOs, and Improbable’s role in it all.

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GDC 2018: Exploring SpatialOS with Improbable CCO Bill Roper

SpatialOS: You’ve probably been seeing this name pop up more and more in the MMO sphere. Worlds AdriftMavericksFractured, SeedMetaWorld, and Identity are just some of the titles we’ve mentioned that have sprung up to use Improbable’s platform. The company picked up more than half a billion dollars from Japanese company SoftBank, roped in MMO veteran Bill Roper, and got Jagex to announce its intention to use it in a future project. However Chronicles of Elyria recently noted it’s dropping Improbable’s baby, and both on and off the record, developers I spoke to at GDC 2018 had mixed reactions – assuming they’d even heard about SpatialOS at all.

What’s the big deal about the platform? What does it do? Why should developers care? Why should MMO players care? I attended a panel by Improbable and briefly sat down with CCO Bill Roper to try to figure it all out.

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Colony sim Seed aims to simulate life whether you’re logged in or not

What do you get when you mash up Rimworld, The Sims, and EVE Online? Probably a big mess, but adjacent to that mess somewhere is Seed. Developed by Klang Games and using Improbable OS, Seed is a colony simulator in which players will make high-level management decisions about a fledgling settlement while their villagers go on living and working even while the player is offline.

It is an unusual and different sort of MMO than players are used to seeing, which is why it might be prudent to watch this short interview by PC Gamer to understand the full sales pitch for this sci-fi title.

“What we’re doing is a game that’s about simulating life. That isn’t a space that’s been explored before. We think we’re pretty early movers in simulation-based MMOs,” said Klang Co-Founder Mundi Vondi. Check out the interview below!

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Betawatch: A new year, a new closed beta (January 5, 2018)

Here we are, in the untamed wilderness of 2018! It feels a lot like 2017 so far, except that it’s a year later. Also, at least here, it’s buried under snow. Also, Global Adventures has moved into its closed beta test, which is new. You can get in on that, although you should feel fairly warned that it’s going to have a wipe prior to open beta, so fairly warned be ye.

For the most part, it seems that studios were still remembering that they have to get back to work if they’re going to enjoy the new year. But we still had some movement on the beta front, so that’s all right. Examples of such are listed below.

That’s not a bad way to kick off the year, huh? There’s going to be more this year, we’re sure, but we’ve still got a list past the break of the games we know to be in testing. If something has skipped into launch or seems to have quietly shuttered while evading our notice, do let us know down in the comments. It’s very helpful and we appreciate it.

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Seed offers fans a brief look at pre-alpha footage

You could argue that a pre-alpha is itself a seed that will eventually grow into a full, playable game. It’d be a bit of a tortured metaphor, but it would also mean that you could make the argument that the two minutes of pre-alpha footage available for Seed below represent a seed of Seed. And isn’t it all worth as many tortured metaphors as it takes to make a lame joke?

Probably not. In fact, it’s probably more productive to just watch the footage and think a little bit about what you’re seeing on the screen. You get to see the early version of building structures, plotting gardens, and developing a campsite from a small gathering into a larger group, so all of that is pretty indicative of the final game Seed wants to be. We’ll see how it blossoms over the coming months.

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Betawatch: Crowfall shares lots of fun stuff (September 15, 2017)

Good news for Crowfall fans this week because there’s plenty on the docket about the game’s development. You might not consider a whole lot of discussion about how the game succeeded at crowdfunding to be new content, but you’ve also got the full list of race/class combinations at launch and a dangerous beachhead for players to fight around. So there’s lots of good stuff happening for fans, yes?

The remainder of the beta news… well, there’s some good stuff in there, too! And one thing that’s perhaps not so good. Let’s head right in.

Meanwhile, we’ve got that full list of games down below with all of the information you could possibly expect at this point from our regular weekly column. Did something jump to a new phase of testing without us noticing? Let us know down in the comments, we find that fascinating and only marginally annoying. (And the annoyance is with the studios who don’t let us know, mind.)

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Seed explains its AI-driven design and its 2018 test plans

The bad news for fans eagerly looking on with Seed’s development is that the game isn’t going to be opening up for external testing until 2018, so you shouldn’t be expecting it any time soon. Heck, the most likely date is around summer 2018. The good news, though, is that once it does arrive players will have a new world to explore that’s driven far more by AI than anything else, according to the most recent development outline on the official site.

While the game had an initial prototype already build, the development team has gone back to basics and is building from the beginning, with the current focus on actionable objects to help guide AI entities through the game world. From there, it’s time to work on feelings and relationships to let things develop organically over time. Read through the whole document if you’re curious; it won’t make the wait any shorter, but it will possibly get you interested in waiting.

Source: Official Site; thanks to Kinya for the tip!

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Colony MMO Seed secures additional funding

Last week we reported that Klang Games is making an interesting-looking colony survival game called Seed that is utilizing SpatialOS to create this expansive virtual world. Now Seed might be in a better position than ever to make it across the launch line, thanks to additional funding secured by its developer.

“The Berlin-based developer Klang Games has secured additional funding to power the creation of its AI-driven strategy MMO, Seed. The undisclosed amount comes way of Greylock Partners’ Discovery Fund, David Helgason of Unity, and the investor Joi Ito,” Gamasutra notes.

Klang has also hired a Harvard law professor to help shape Seed’s political structure. What, you thought you’d be able to create your own little utopian colony without having to resort to elections, voter fraud, and Twitter mishaps? That would be just straight-up covfefe.

Source: Gamasutra

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