Guild Chat: Starting a raiding guild in Guild Wars 2

    
11

Welcome along to Guild Chat, the place where we gather to discuss a reader submission on whatever guild-related topic is giving him or her cause for concern in order to help them through. This time, we’re going to help reader John get to grips with starting up a raiding guild in Guild Wars 2, a game in which raiding is relatively new and guilds are fairly fluid and casual. John’s issue is further complicated by the fact that most of his core guild group haven’t tackled many of the raid bosses, so guild management will be difficult to establish. Join me below for both John’s full submission and my thoughts on the issue, and don’t forget to add your own advice in the comments below.

Tina, I have been playing GW2 off and on since launch and am an experienced player with over 9k achievement points. I am running through Heart of Thorns content and have had some success with raiding with random learning groups. I’ve cleared the first wing but want something more solid for the second wing, so I am looking into setting up a specific raiding guild. My question really boils down to whether you think it’s a good idea in GW2 since the guilds are so nebulous and none of my in-game friends have more raiding experience than trying out a boss or two with PuGs.

 

–John

You do know how to appeal to this lass, John… raiding and GW2 in one submission? First thing’s first: I’m going to divide my advice into general guidance for setting up a raiding guild and then particular modifications for your MMO of choice. This is mostly because I dislike making Guild Chat too game specific where possible so that the advice can apply to other readers in similar situations too. Hopefully by the end of this article, you’ll be well on your way to forming a solid raiding team and downing bosses.

GW2_HoT_11_2015_Pylon_Minions

General raiding guild advice

Establish some ground rules before recruiting

Setting up your own raiding guild will require some planning on your part: Get together with that core group of friends you described and start piecing together a guild charter of sorts and a rough schedule for a typical week. A guild charter should tackle issues such as loot distribution (not so relevant in your specific case, John), guild resource access, and anything else that’ll be relevant in the MMO you play. For more ideas on how to start out on the right foot, check out my guild ingredient list. You’ll also need to sort out a list of what roles you need to fill, bearing in mind that each boss will have specific group composition requirements, and make an ad with those details to share on all the relevant channels when you’re ready.

Think about how you wish to recruit

Recruitment is another area that requires some careful consideration. In the case of creating a raiding guild, you’ll want to outline clear requirements for your prospective members, such as gear, gear enhancement use, favoured builds where relevant, raiding commitment in terms of time, and anything else relevant to how raids run in your chosen MMO. For this reason, I recommend keeping guild documents that you can copy and paste from, sort of like an induction crib sheet for new members or an FAQ for applicants, or better yet, creating a guild website to hold that information.

I personally like to use simple application forms hosted on a guild website to handle recruitment because then I can quickly gather all the needed information from applicants without a wall of PMs. This is where having clear requirements outlined in advance pays dividends: You check that information off sequentially when looking at each application, allowing for more than one set of eyes to appraise applicants with some degree of standardisation. This is my preferred method of handling these things, but if your recruitment is small enough in scope you may not need all the formalised fuss.

Set up a guild structure and assess any skill gaps

You’ll need to decide on how you’re going to oversee the new guild and then reflect that in the guild structure you set up. I recommend keeping it simple with four ranks to begin with: You’ll have Guild Leader(s), who will be you and maybe another good friend you don’t mind sharing power with; Raid Officers, who are those who you trust help administer guild resources and teach tactics; Raiders, the members who have been approved by you or your Officers to raid; and finally New Recruits, members you’ve recently inducted while you are trialing them in a raiding spot. More advanced setups might use labeling to link people with alts if your MMO doesn’t already make those connections, and it might place raiders in different ranks based on raid role or group in larger guilds.

Once you’ve decided on a structure, you’ll need to consider whether you have enough core people to fully fill out the upper ranks, and you’ll also need to ensure that your leaders have the skills to properly fill the roles you’ve planned for them. If you’re unsure, a good rule of thumb is one raid leader for each group, plus one extra Officer for general guild admin for every fifty or so people (not characters) on the roster. To start with, I recommend running with just one raiding group that you lead plus perhaps two other people to help you out. This sounds excessive based on my breakdown above but will give you room to get to know your new role and guildmates as well as the manpower to expand without needing to recruit more officers again.

GW2_HoT_11_2015_Gorseval_2

Running a raiding guild in GW2

Drill the tactics and step up your game

Another pressing concern that’s particular to your situation, John, is that you and your friends are a little short in raiding experience. This isn’t by any means a deal breaker, and there are many ways around this. I’d recommend checking out detailed raiding guides for each boss you plan on tackling, especially those you’ve not yet attempted yourself. Either recreate those tactics in a form you can digest, or have links to your favourite guides (ahem, ahem) handy for sharing.

Ensure that you have several characters primed for raiding each where possible to allow for optimum group composition for each boss: This really can make all the difference for novice and intermediate raiders, especially when it comes to DPS walls and CC. You need to practice what you preach in the guild charter and requirements, of course, so don’t slack on gearing those alts if you want to bring them along.

Gauge the general experience of your guild and start there

Don’t expect to have a guild filled with people who have fully cleared every boss: You are far more likely to find success with people who have similar (or even less) raiding experience than you do, simply because trying to find successful hardcore raiders who are willing to slow down and fill your ranks is a big ask. Since the game was never historically geared to that market, you’ll find that most guilds are jack-of-all-trade or PvP types, so you’re venturing into quite a new area with a dedicated raiding guild: I want you to manage your expectations. I can’t tell you what sort of experience level your new guildies will have or whether or not they’ll rep your guild permanently, so I’d suggest that you should ask about their raiding experience as part of your applications and should also ask about other in-game commitments so you can pitch to the audience you attract.

Communicate out-of-game to catch non-reppers

The reality of our MMO of choice is that guild hopping is not only common, it’s inherently encouraged by the guild mechanics. This is good and bad for those who are forming new guilds: It’s a plus because it takes significantly less commitment on behalf of your guildmates to join up, but the downside is that it’s difficult to catch everyone because many people aren’t going to represent a new, small guild. You can account for this by firstly being consistent with your raiding times each week so that people know when to turn up, and also by ensuring you communicate somewhere out-of-game to include as many people as possible.

I have used several different methods in my raiding guilds, including Facebook groups, online schedules on a guild website, and a whole pile of VOIP chat programs. Voice communication will make your raiding attempts go much more smoothly, so I recommend that as the first point of contact for your new guild. Keep a casual channel that people can hang out in and advertise your raid start times in your channel descriptions to capture your audience. No matter which method you use, regular communication is critical in a fledgling guild, so try to minimise the legwork in any way you can so that you don’t need to torture your raiders by whisper to keep them engaged. Good luck downing bosses and having fun with your new guildies, and do let me know if you need any more advice!

Sloth_Sleepy

Over to you!

What do you think about John’s new venture into raiding? How would you go about setting up a guild to tackle a new type of content in your MMo of choice? Have you anything to add to my advice? Let John know in the comments.

Thanks to John for this edition’s topic. Don’t forget to email me your guild-related questions!

MOP’s Tina Lauro is on-hand to deal with all of your guild-related questions, queries, and drama in Guild Chat. Whatever your guild issue, she’s sure to have a witty yet sympathetic response. If there’s a specific topic you’d like to see dissected, drop Tina a comment or send an email to tina@massivelyop.com.
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Inoxe
Guest
Inoxe

anatheod 
A guild that doesn’t want to teach newcomers about raids, or fractals, or whatever, is NOT worth joining. As a new member, you’ll have to be a mind-reader to discern what tactics they use, and fit into their preconceptions about how you should play your class in their groups.
Running a raiding guild is not unlike running a military unit. This includes the responsibility to teach the “TPP” (tactical practices and procedures”) to the rank and file. Even if a recruit passed basic training with flying colors, their ability to survive and contribute in the “combat zone” requires they follow the same TPP as the rest of the people in that unit.

Therefore, one of the vital abilities in a guild officer corps is the patience to teach the “guild way” of doing things to newcomers. Any guild unwilling or unable to do that will soon die for lack of new blood. The incompetent leadership will never understand that its demise was due to their inability to train and support newcomers.

Inoxe
Guest
Inoxe

paragonlostinspace 
You should try spending money for or in Black Desert Online. Their monetary transaction systems make Arena Net look like paragons of virtue!

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

Anatidae paragonlostinspace   Yes, please re-read my post. I am aware of the contracted outside of ArenaNet processing company. As I said before if I recall the processing company is in Ireland if I recall what Anet said the last time we spoke to these half wits.

Again, this is the only company that I run into this problem with repeatedly. Again, my wife and I have our information correct, have tried a few credit cards and yet Anet can’t seem to help us get this fixed. Again, please Google this and you’ll find it isn’t uncommon.  Again, my CC companies aren’t disapproving the charges, they aren’t even seeing the attempt, it’s all on Anet’s processing company. 

 Again, Anet will not tell me what we need to do to correct their condescending phone help was more along the lines of “Well you could go and purchase our game cards from some store”. WTF Anet, I have to run around and jump through hoops to give you money? Really? We’ve got good credit, 740 plus credit scores etc we spend a lot online and never have these issues.

 Is there just some sort of reading disconnect here, that people are failing to understand that we’ve attempted to do everything to correct this? We want to spend money with them, we tend to be the dreaded “whale” type of players. Though I am not a fan of the whole cash shop system I make full use of it when I play an mmorpg that has it as does the wife. Specially when there are cosmetic or convenience items to purchase.

Anatidae
Guest
Anatidae

paragonlostinspace You know, it’s not that ArenaNet is doing their own CC processing. They use some service, and it’s that service that is causing the problem. 

Vendors can increase the security of the CC purchase by verifying more elements of your ID. At minimum, they need your CC number, expiration and CC code. But you can add in zip, name, address, etc… If any of those elements doesn’t check – they can get denied. Also, the company validating the purchase might have more fraud detection rules in place.

Even your own bank/CC company might deny purchases from ArenaNet more often than other people on suspected fraud. 

All these are possibilities. I feel very confident in saying that ArenaNet would LOVE to take your money.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

disUserNameTake paragonlostinspace   

                  You want to stop deleting your posts and changing your remarks before I can even post. Sheesh.  They won’t tell what I need to do prevent this from happening. They have been no help at all any time I try to correct this issue. 

What part of this do you not understand. Btw why am I toxic for voicing and issue that’s on going and that many others have also had to do deal with? Have Googled this, it’s a known issues many others have had issues with as well.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

disUserNameTake paragonlostinspace  Your original post was more amusing to me, the one you deleted. I actually made it clear as to why I wasn’t raiding in GW2…yet. Of course at this rate I won’t ever. If you offer me the ability to buy shiney’s than please allow me to. ;p The things you said in the self deleted post and now this post prove to me that you have decided not to actually read my post. Ignore my rant, it was exactly rate. A rant about how these half wits get in the way of making money.  Btw stop editing your damn post while I’m responding. Sheesh, stick to a point.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

I’d love to get the point where I could raid in GW2. Unfortunately every time I start to get into the game and start really focusing on exploring and leveling a character class ArenaNet quickly reminds me why I think that they’re a joke. Let me explain, I like to investigate game mechanics, class mechanics in particular. Which means I tend to be an altoholic by nature.

So what happens is I’ll start leveling up a class that’s caught my eye that for whatever reason I want to delve into. First thing is that GW2 has this really nice shop system where I can get all the convenience items that my heart could desire.  Also I love to make each character I play look differently so if you have fluff clothing items I’ll be sure to snag them if one catches the look that I want with that particular class.

 So, what purchases these nifty items? Gems, how do you get gems? You buy them with cash of course. Awesome, both the wife and I have great credit scores and spend quite a bit every year on our hobbies, interests etc. Works for me… problem is ArenaNet are incompetent half wits who have a lousy system in place that gets in the way of my giving them money. They contract system outside to a company Ireland I learned last year.

 Basically it’s a coin toss whether this company will “ok”  your gem purchase. You’ll learn no reason why they refuse to allow the purchase and ArenaNet will give you no real answer to correct this issue. I told them the last time I ran into the issue last year that I wished we still lived in Washington because I’d run by their shop and offer to give them notarized copies of our freaking license, passport, whatever it took to get them to stop hindering my wife and I’s efforts to give them money.

 So why this rant? I’d been focusing on my leveling my ranger since becoming active again and had spent most of my gems on getting the gathering tools which are like 1000 or so gems each, maxing out his bags and get some clothing that I thought fit him. Thing is my wife actually decided to come back as well and wanted to play a mesmer, well I thought I’d check into that class as well so I could better understand it and help her if she had questions. 

 Get where I’m going, last week I’d bought 50 bucks of gems and they allowed it. This week, nope they refused to allow me to buy gems. Hell I’d buy a lot more than 50 bucks if they’d allow me the highest they go 100.00 but that one always gets turned down. Every freaking time. ArenaNet offers services that they won’t allow you to really use without a lot of hoop jumping, every freaking time.

 So piss on em, I know it ticks the wife off and she probably will not play because she loves to snag pets/miniatures and fluff like that. If she can’t buy gems so she can buy that stuff she’ll get pissed and not bother. Me, I’m already pissed because I know how the open ticket or phone call with these people will go. It’s frustrating, they jerk you around and make you feel that it’s an issue on your part and it isn’t. My CC’s never get the charge attempt. I spent a lot on my hobbies and gaming is one of them.

  This is the “only” company that I repeatedly run into issues, no answers and headaches dealing with them in order for them to take my money. They could get getting an extra grand easily off of me every year instead they make it so I and my wife don’t want to log in at all for another six months to a year. All well, I guess I’ll go ahead and spend the grand on getting some more upgrades to my motorcycle. (shrugs)  So yeah, I guess I’ll never get around to capping and checking out raiding in GW2.

/rant

JayPower
Guest
JayPower

anatheod That’s exactly like my experience trying to get onto the tennis team in High School.

Elven_Seraph
Guest
Elven_Seraph

I love raids in other games, but GW2 raids are not in the least fun.  Just a dumb timed thing.

Line with more hugs
Guest
Line with more hugs

Things are going much better with multiple raid groups for me.
We have dedicated days to progress in the current raid, where you need to know what to do and what to play.
And we have dedicated days where we start the raid from scratch with full briefing before each encounter, available to all present; along class and roles explained in detail before and after the raids.

It’s a huge boon for a guild to prepare new players for raids, but it’s also very important for the community. Not everyone will have the time or the gear for raiding, but you have a lot more to do together in GW2 than in the average themepark. It also helps a ton to recruit… leading event chains has been incredibly fruitful, you get active people that could be interested in raids but rarely do so, and won’t check out the forum for the latest raid guild.
Players getting invested in the game are more important for a community than living bots popping up for raids and nothing else.