First impressions of Fallout 76 Wastelanders from a true newbie to the game

It's a janky mess, but its storytelling is superb

    
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So I did something completely unexpected: I bought Fallout 76. It wasn’t my idea. A few people in my guild had been talking about how much fun it was, especially after the launch of Wastelanders, and my husband wanted to give a spin, and so here we are. It’s been an experience that has been both exactly what I expected (which wasn’t much) and more than what I was expecting.

Let me start with why I hadn’t played up until this point. I have watched the slow moving train-wreck that is Bethesda with misstep after misstep for the better part of two years. From baffling “no NPCs makes it gooder!” to “the nylon bags we bought from the unmarked white van parked around the corner from the office are just as good as canvas,” I wasn’t impressed. It seemed like a hot steaming pile of developer hubris about what gamers really want, and… well, I quite literally wasn’t buying it.

Now that I’ve sunk about 30 hours of played time into the game, has my opinion changed? Yes! Or well, no. Maybe? Let’s walk the wasteland, both metaphorical and virtual, together, and you can see how the opinion of a newbie to the game differs from the earlier impressions of our veteran Fallout writer.

Can’t miss the cash shop

Wow, they really want to make sure you know that there’s an Atom store and that you should buy things from it. Because you can see the menu to log into the game when launching, there’s a wonderful Atom store pop-up that you have to dismiss before you are allowed to log into the game. It’s distracting and a bad introduction to the game, especially if you’re not a fan of obtrusive MMO monetization.

Now, the store does offer free items every week. In the main menu, the Atom Store has a huge “FREE” badge next to it to let you know. But the game doesn’t make the free things easy to find; you have to scroll through everything in the store to find the items that are marked as free. It’s a wonderfully annoying way to make sure I have to look at more crap in the store.

References to the Atom store are peppered throughout the experience. You are never quite left unaware of the fact that you could be spending more money on the game than the $40 you’ve already coughed up.

Ye olde Bethsoft interface

I spent many of my early hours of the game random shouting profanity at the game – not because the game was hard but because the control scheme for the game is bizarrely terrible. It’s a stitched-together monstrosity of control schemes that would give Mary Shelley nightmares. For example, to get the menu to log out of the game, did you know you need to open the map first, then open the game menu? Or how about to open your friends list, you also have to open the map.

There are, of course, keyboard shortcuts for these things, but they are equally baffling. Instead of the typical “O” for friend’s list as we see in most online games, Fallout 76 will cheekily tell you can open your social menu by hitting Ctrl-Tab. But it will only tell you this after you’ve been invited to group with someone. Up until then, you have to go hunting to find the shortcut. It’s also not especially helpful that the tooltip explaining the shortcut (and the team invite) is on the screen for only a second, so it’s easy to miss the notification altogether. If you check out Game Controls by opening your Map, hitting “Z” for the game Menu, then mousing down to Settings and opening Game Controls – the keyboard shortcut isn’t even mentioned.

Like previous Bethesda games, Fallout 76 makes copious use of the Tab and Space keys when interacting with the game world. But they don’t function consistently. Sometimes you hit Space to interact with something, and sometimes hitting Space cancels the interaction. Sometimes you hit Tab or “E” to interact, and sometimes those keys have different functions. My frustration came in that I was forced to understand how the same keystrokes functioned differently in different contexts with seemingly no rhyme or reason.

This is all old hat to people who’ve been playing the game for a while; they probably don’t even think about the kludge anymore. But it stands out to a newbie.

Using the crafting benches is especially messy. You can do several things at a crafting bench: scrap materials, craft new, and repair/modify your items. But there’s a different key to access each of those functions. If you walk up to a crafting bench and accidentally hit the key to craft instead of scrap, you have to completely exit the bench and go back in. The devs have made this slightly better with the Crafting to Modify/Repair, but I think it’s pretty clear you are still exiting and interacting with the bench again; they just automated that one.

So many bugs

User experience monstrosities not withstanding, the game has bugs beyond measure, way more than I would expect for a game that’s been in gamers’ hands for 18 months. Most annoying to me is actually related to the control scheme: Frequently the game ignores where your cursor is. If you are trying to quickly navigate through menus with mouse clicks, the game will periodically decide that what you are mousing over isn’t really want you want and select a different option. I have accidentally scrapped weapons and armor as a result of this, or had to go through the navigation menu of a terminal two or three times.

My husband and I tried two different Events in the game. Both were “Defend X from waves of attacks.” During the first one, we got to the last wave and it wouldn’t complete because there were still mobs for us to kill but we couldn’t find them. Despite the fact that they should have been running at us, we spent about 10 minutes running around trying to find them. Eventually, we discovered them, but in order to get them, one of us had to leave the event area, thereby forfeiting our rewards for doing the event.

During the second event we attempted, the first wave just… never completed. We weren’t able to find any mobs even after exploring for 10 minutes, so we just said screw it and walked away.

Taking screenshots freezes the game for minutes at a time. Mobs will randomly teleport around or not move at all, even when shot or thwacked with something hard. I will say I’ve never seen see mob respawns in the game world, which is a nice atmospheric touch. It seems as if the devs intentionally make them respawn out of the sight of the player. I have, however, had mobs randomly spawn inside my C.A.M.P – invisible, untargetable, but very audible as they destroyed my stuff. Then they randomly pop into existence just in time to start slapping me around.

And yet I don’t hate it

The game is a mess… but it’s a mess I want to play. Despite an infuriating interface, despite the jank, despite unremarkable combat, I’m having fun. I can’t imagine what playing the game before the addition of NPCs was like, but I suspect it would have felt too much like a real wasteland – too empty and too desolate.

While Bethesda’s QA practices are extremely suspect, its storytelling is still some of the best in the industry — the non-verbal storytelling in particular. The game pulls me in because I want to know more about the people who lived here or are living here. Walking into a building and seeing a skeleton fallen over a crib. Walking into a kitchen to find another skeleton with its head in the oven. Walking up to a house to find two teddy bears in front of a checkers board. Walking down a street and seeing mannequins set up in the middle of the road. These scenarios are compelling for me.

I listened to one holo where the NPC was talking about being locked in closet and dying. I find myself almost obsessively trying to find a piece of civilization that’s still functioning as you find the destroyed remains of attempts to carve out a piece of sanity in the world after the bombs dropped. I find myself fighting against the futility of it all as I wander the wasteland. But Fallout 76, and the Fallout universe overall, conveys a heaviness. It’s a critique of rabid nationalism, materialism, and more damningly, a treatise on the ultimate futility of the human condition. Attempts to the make the world a better place will end in failure, with you on a pike outside a raider’s camp or part of super mutant’s meat sack.

We find ourselves in extraordinary times, where an ill-considered tweet (redundant, I know) can make the Fallout universe a whole lot less fantasy and a whole lot more reality, a situation that compounds this heaviness. There’s a kernel of possibility that we could easily end up there that consistently settles into background unease both in the game and not.

My verdict

All in all, it’s a fun but deeply dysfunctional game. I wasn’t expecting it to be as fun and engaging as it is, but I did expect the asinine bugs throughout and wasn’t let down. Thirty hours into the game, I’ve already got my money’s worth out of the game. Will it hold my attention for another 30 hours? I don’t know. But for right now, I have more stories to find in the wasteland.

Massively Overpowered skips scored reviews; they’re outdated in a genre whose games evolve daily. Instead, our veteran reporters immerse themselves in MMOs to present their experiences as hands-on articles, impressions pieces, and previews of games yet to come. First impressions matter, but MMOs change, so why shouldn’t our opinions?

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tinythinker
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tinythinker

The whole “mess of a UI” thing bothered me at launch. I tried the game again a few months after launch, about a year after launch (for a day or two), then a couple of weeks ago (a long day). There are also some other issue people run into, with the game choosing ideal setting for things like screen resolution that then mismatch the size of the screen for your mouse pointer to the actual display area. The latter you can fix after searching for the cause online, but shouldn’t have to. The UI is still annoying.

I’m not against people who love the game and have been regularly playing it for a long whole, nor against their enjoyment of it. I found my most recent play experience to be more fun than any of my previous experiences. But the fact that Bethesda just seems so wedded to such counter-intuitive and cumbersome UI choices is concerning. As are some bugs that either never left or seem to come back from the dead. Adding choices in UI customization, either a couple pre-packaged options you can readily swap between or more easily found and used a la carte options, would help the game quite a bit with new players. And keeping new players is vital for any game.

The game play did not feel too bad recently (by the standard of my previous experiences with the game) as a low level character doing very simple things, and I made progress on some questing that kept me engaged and having fun. It feels like the build that exists at this moment is where the game should have been at just before or after launch. Some awkward UI stuff that needs patched, various bugs and glitches that need solved, but still a game you can get into and enjoy while waiting for the fixes. That’s what happened with ESO and it gave the devs time for bigger restructuring and adding more desired content. My concern is that because this *isn’t* a new game release, a degree of complacency has had a chance to creep in among the devs for some things (and possibly among a portion of the player-base as well).

I hope the new wave of people trying or returning to the game will inspire a new round of QoL fixes for a lot of the basic issues that will be front and center for such players. Time will tell, I suppose.

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Alexus Yanova

Your experience with events is exactly what I have seen in game – some NPCs just spawn in wrong locations such as under ground or out of bounds of event area. I also seen this happen on streams on Twitch. What’s really disappointing is that if the game was allowed to be played offline or if the servers would be allowed to be hosted by players – someone could easily fix it and provide the fix for everyone to use. Bethesda, of course, does not want to do this because of one and only reason: Atomic Shop.

It is even more disappointing to see people defending Bethesda and the game in general. Especially people who pay for Bethesda’s subscription for this game or for cosmetic items. Sure, they may personally enjoy the game and paying for poor quality control and poor bug fixing, but they only think about themselves and their own enjoyment when they do this. If they would stop doing this – Bethesda would have more incentive to improve this game faster for EVERYONE to encourage more rational people to pay for good quality game, or they would give up and allow people to host the game on their own PCs or play it completely offline which would also benefit EVERYONE because EVERYONE could easily download and use any user-created fixes or new user-created content, including new areas and new quests and new NPCs. But hey, most people are very selfish and very narrow-minded by nature, especially when it comes to specific countries, this is why we have such President in US right now ;-)

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rafael12104

A few more notes now that I have a little time to actually reply.

First, despite all of the angst and mishegas from the masses and the personal attacks I have experienced, not here btw, for being a Fallout-1st customer, I’m really enjoying Wastelanders. It has brought me back, full circle, to the optimism I had for the game when it was first announced.

I’m not whining. Players can have opinions that differ with mine. And I have thick skin should you want to hold me responsible for Bnet just because I choose to sub. But I am feeling a little more vindicated these days. Heh.

The game can still be a shit show at times as some of the old fixed bugs have made a triumphant return. And the hacks and cheats are sometimes rampant depending on the world you log into. But the fun has never been better.

And so, I’m finally doing what I’ve been wanting to do all along. Have the wonderful magic that was Fallout 4 but online so I can explore and enjoy it with my friends.

And by the by, I wouldn’t trade my Fallout-1st membership for the world now. I would not play this game without it. Nope, not at all.

No hacks or cheats in my world. No theft. No dupes. No waiting for spawns. My CAMP is stationery. The world mobs are never 30 levels above me. And, my friends can curry all the benefits too.

The only thing missing is more customization for my Fallout-1st world.

But enough! Back to the Wastelands I go my friends.

Karma_Mule
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Karma_Mule

This is almost exactly how I feel too! FO76 has lots of problems, but for me the good decidedly outweighs the bad now, and with Wastelanders I can see myself playing this for a long time.

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rafael12104

Heh. This game is a lightening rod now, no matter what. It is hard to be objective when you are picking sides.

Andy, I liked your article. I think it is pretty fair. I only wonder what the experience would have been like if you knew nothing about the developer. I’m not advocating for Bnet. They deserve what the sow. But maybe the pendulum has swung too far the other way.

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Nathan Aldana

I suspect someone with no knowledge of Bethjesda,.which, tbh, feels almost impossible, is being even less forgiving of the bugs because a lot of us know to expect jank from bethesda.

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Covynant001

Regarding Andy’s event experiences all I can say is she and her husband had unusually bad luck, hitting two events with a similar issue.

I would be interested to know if they were Wastelander new player events or one of the originals.

Also, 30 plus hours is a very long time to play yet only doing two events, I recommend they try a few more before casting final judgement

BTW, when a target is located outside the event perimeter I will go outside, shoot it once, then lure it back until I am back inside the zone before finishing it off, no penalty for doing so.

My friend and I completed over 15 events last evening evening across every region in the game, never hitting any sort of issue which prevented us from completing the event or getting the full reward.

I feel the author’s experience was an uncommon one and I would like to see a follow up one day on if her experience with events becomes more positive as I feel the results reported here are largely atypical.

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Zero_1_Zerum

I’ve played every single Fallout game, except ’76. I mean, 1,2 and Tactics, from before Bethesda, and 3, NV and 4, from after they got their hands on the franchise. I’ve loved their take on the single player Fallout games, but my favorite is still Obsidian’s NV.

After reading this, I’m still going to make ’76 the exception. I still won’t play it. Too many bugs, too much trying to dip into people’s wallets after they buy the game.

There’s still the feeling of a lot of people who don’t know how to make a Fallout game getting together with a lot of people who don’t know how to make an MMO, and calling themselves MMO game devs.

After ’76, Bethesda is going to have to do a lot before I buy another game from them, because they’ve lost a lot of my trust.

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Crowe

Good article, thanks. I’ll definitely have to take a big pass on this after all. After 18 months, there is no excuse for most of these bugs to be around if they are actually interested in bringing in new customers and haven’t put it in maintenance mode already. I’m not expecting it to be bug free but some of the stuff I’ve read talks about the bugs being in the game since launch. I had been reading the occasional article with the hope that Bethesda finally figure it out but pretty much everything I’ve read talks about the large number of bugs. End result: doesn’t sound like it’s worth my time.

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Sorenthaz

I guess to me it’s kind of like how I felt about Sea of Thieves. The pre-game menu can be a bit of a turnoff but once getting past that it feels like a real treat to dip into the world and just sort of bask in it. Difference with Fo76 though is there’s no real pressure to do anything I don’t want to partake in and I can kind of just do whatever the heck I feel like doing within my level range.

At least right now too, the atoms you get from the daily/weekly challenges are pretty fair and doable. Does require you to go out of your way in some cases but it’s not too horrid.

IMO the game would benefit from simply lowering the price down to $20 or so and then going from there. Folks will always complain about monetization but it’s pretty fair and there is plenty in the game without needing to dip into cash shop stuff unless you want specific flavors/styles. Only thing that’s really iffy is the subscription, but adding content with new voiceovers/etc. doesn’t pay for itself and online games do need sustainable revenue streams to keep producing content.

IDK to me it’s a mess, but it’s a lovable mess. It feels good to actually get into the game and play around for a bit, even if I don’t do much. While there is some jank, I have yet to encounter anything that broke it for me, and I always feel good after playing it.

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XanadoX

I’ve been playing since the last patch and I saw this:

> Ads to get to the game (what’s next? coca-cola ad to dismiss before you play the game you paid?).

> Private servers only behind subscribtion wall, but only for 8 players? there has been a really nuclear war!. And it’s not worth, as…

> The free servers hosts too few players too (24 player for a huge map) and they change everytime you enter ( if you have any sort of problem, just relog). To avoid problem with housing in the same place, you can choose to change your server or get it in your inventory. No way to select the server.

> Why are they selling the private server option? Because you can feed up your char in a private server and then use it in common servers. That’s really pay to win.

> Player position always displayed on the map. Forget any surprise factor.

> PVP useless, if another player doesn’t return fire good luck killing him.

> no chat (only voice chat if enabled). why would you chat in an MMO? or maybe they are going to sell a DLC for that?

> Wanna repair,get some repair from the cash shop. We had p2w, now we have p2r epair.

So no real MMO here (unless you consider FIFA an MMO), but you can think that perhaps it’s a good cooperative game. It hasn’t been design like that:

> Many missions and story has to be done alone (instanced) or as many times as players in the party.

The good part, the histories and ambientation. A game for explorers.

is it worth? up to you, but remember:

b2p+p2w+p2r

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Sorenthaz

Sounds like you have an incredibly broad definition of P2W and were hoping this would be PvP Sandbox #552.

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Tim Bartlett

Yikes, where to start with THIS. You say you’ve played the game, but it sounds like you read some posts on the internet and just copied what you read. Hard to believe you’ve actually played it.

1. “They advertise in game events and cash shop updates like many MMO style games do. It sure would be terrible if this unrealistic slippery slope I created somehow came true.” This is a non-point as you literally took a logical fallacy and tried to make it a reality.

2. This has been known for a long time for anyone that has done research. I pity anyone who has actually been so desperate to actually pay to have a private server. They’re overall useless but some people absolutely do not want strangers on their servers and if they want to pay that, so be it.

3. Yes, they only hold 24 players (once again, anyone who looked up anything about it would know this since it’s been known since before beta) and it doesn’t need more than that, perhaps 36 at most. We don’t need the maps full of players. A wasteland with 100 (as an example) players on the same map makes zero sense and goes against the idea that the area is a wasteland.

Yes… you can change server if you’re having housing problems, that sounds like a positive to me. The way to do it in a group is pretty janky, but it’s still possible.

Yes, I would agree that the whole way they handle the servers is silly, but the game isn’t set up so you can “select” a server, and once again, was never advertised as such. If your friends want to join the server you’re on, they have to select you in the friends list and go to your server. Once again, it does suck and it’s janky. If you’re having so many housing problems when you log in then perhaps it’s time to move your house as it must be a popular spot.

Also, thinking private servers are P2W is laughable. Literally anything you can do on a private server you can do in a public server at the same rate. Literally the only difference is that there are less people allowed… woo? There is no difference. You can hop server to server and do the same thing with public servers. The term P2W has been so overused and diluted that everything someone doesn’t like is suddenly P2W, I guess.

4. I feel like a broken record here but this has been known since before the Beta ever came out. Why you would care if people know where you are is beyond me. Crouch if you’re so worried about it. People aren’t going to attack you unless you’re in the PVP server that DOES exist and pretty much answers the next point.

5. [snipped here because it looks like the PvP server was removed due to no one using it] I guess you really aren’t going to get PvP in this game because no one wants to PvP.

6. Some people want it, I think it’s a horrible idea. Most players of this are players of past Fallout games and want to play by themselves. Not having to see people ranting about stupid crap like politics and how much they love lady parts is a plus side to not having a chat system. Another “Barrens Chat”, if you will They can give you the option to “disable” it like they did with voice chat, but they’d have to show that with some sort of icon that you have it disabled like they do with voice. Adding text chat brings the assumption that the person who is running around you is can see what you type and it makes it look like you’re ignoring them on purpose.

P.S. implementation of this IS in the works.

7. You can do it the right way… by playing the game and getting the materials that are easily obtainable with a couple minutes of work, or you can spend money and do what people can already do much faster than it took you to buy a pointless item from the cash shop? It’s “pay to be lazy”, not “pay to repair”.

8. Actually… there aren’t very many missions at all that can only be done with a single person. “A few” is correct, but not sure why this is an issue anyway, every MMO that I can think of has it’s share of single player story missions. I went through the game before Wastelanders with a friend and did fine.

Just yikes, man.

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Sorenthaz

On the private servers angle, to be fair they are super duper handy for farming areas that have things placed out in various spots (like military ammo bags). You don’t have to worry about other people having already looted areas so you get access to all of the fresh stuff that is laid out for whoever gets it first. Each time you log/in out you’re basically getting a fresh new server so it’s super handy for that purpose.

Other than that though, yeah a private server isn’t that enticing unless you want to play with a friend or friends. The other pro is that everything is scaled to your own level and you don’t have to worry about areas having higher level stuff spawned by level 100+ folks running around, BUT that’s a temporary pro since One Appalachia is planned for sometime this summer.

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Covynant001

The real benefit of private servers is you can take control of the workshops, all of them at once if you like, and farm an enormous amount of rarer materials, ammo or power cores with no annoying PVPer to take it from you.

As you can farm in total safety, then access or sell these materials in the regular servers it probably does make the private server a bit P2W, which I’m fine with paying for at $12.99 per month.

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Sorenthaz

That too. Basically though the main benefit in general is just farming-related. Maybe it can get you more caps but eh. Several events and content though aren’t really designed for solo play though so the only real benefit to use a solo private server is for the sake of farming.

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rafael12104

Nailed it.

The only thing I would add is that buying repair kits and or scrap kits isn’t p2w no matter how you define it.

Why? Because you make Atoms playing the game. And it’s not nickle an dime shit. 30 Atoms here and 40 there, it adds up pretty quick if you just want those gaming chaning kits. Heh.

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XanadoX

I am not saying repairing is p2w. I said it’s pay to repair ( I clearly separated the 2 concepts)

Private servers are p2w to me. So we have: b2p+p2w+p2r

I got 280 atoms in the last 11 hours. 1 repair kit is 50 atoms. How many repairs do you need in 11 hours? that depends on the number of times you have been killed.

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XanadoX

First of all, thanks for your answer. I have arrived till level 18, I met the woman you start the game looking for and I did the duchess arch missions and many missions. Btw, I got 280 atoms in 11 hours(steam time). I played whith Bethesda launcher and, when it was possible, I played with steam. I would like to point out some comments:

1) You have to dismiss the ad before accesing the menu. Just open the game and see it by yourself. There is a difference between showing ads and dismissing ads.

2/3/4/5) A bad design is not saved by: you should know it before you pay. When someone comes here to read about the first impressions of the game it’s likely they don’t know that the “MMO” is for only 24 players. And when you pay for something you can expect to have something better than the regular server. But you got a 8 ppl server. I agreee than changing server is a good option when there are housing problems.
Private servers are P2W, as it is been explained by Sorenthaz and Covynant001. They should be separated, but where will be the point to rent one?

6) (no chat) why is there an emoticon system to comunicate with other players? the no chat decisition is either a bad design decision or a way to sell the emoticons in the cash shop.

7) I haven’t been able to repair some weapons. There was no material list, just repair kits. Maybe a bug?

8) Well, I have teamed all the time with a friend and we find out that at the entrace of the instanced zones you can select whether to enter by your own or enter to help the team leader. So the team splits up every instance zone. Are we doing that wrong?

The game has a tremendous background and personality that may be enough for some to forgive the bad design or the greedy design. You start playing and it’s likely you are not going to do what you expected to do. Before arriving there you will change your mind and explore an abandoned farm, or find someone interesting, or… (that’s a really good thing nowadays)

So it’s a pity they haven’t done what it could be a great game. A missed oppotunity.

Wastelander is a step in the right way. But we are too far away…

Have a nice day.

Random MMO fan
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Random MMO fan

6. Some people want it, I think it’s a horrible idea. Most players of this are players of past Fallout games and want to play by themselves. Not having to see people ranting about stupid crap like politics and how much they love lady parts is a plus side to not having a chat system. Another “Barrens Chat”, if you will They can give you the option to “disable” it like they did with voice chat, but they’d have to show that with some sort of icon that you have it disabled like they do with voice. Adding text chat brings the assumption that the person who is running around you is can see what you type and it makes it look like you’re ignoring them on purpose.

Of course, it is very easy to type nonsense such as “horrible idea” when you think only about your personal interests. Fun fact: there a millions of people who cannot use voice chat for various reasons, some of them have anxiety issues, some cannot talk to anyone at all due to physical disability, some cannot talk because they play at a time of the day and in a place where talking might disrupt other people’s activities, some might not have headset for various reasons. The point is, for them the in-game text chat is the only way to communicate with other players, and without it the game might as well be a single-player game, in which case there is no good reason to even force those players to connect to Bethesda’s servers.

As for your nonsense comments about unwanted chat conversations – every MMORPG game I played I could easily block anyone in text chat so I would never see their comments if I did not like it. I also do not understand why would it matter to anyone if other person is ignoring your text in chat – I do that all the time in other games with text chat (for example ignoring guild invites or group invite messages typed in text chat) and nobody bothered me about the fact I was not responding in text chat.

P.S. implementation of this IS in the works.

Bethesda has been saying that they are looking to add text chat since 2018, but it is still not in game, considering this none of what they say should be taken seriously until it is in game.

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Blake

The janky UI is one of the worst aspects of the game and really is a massive letdown. Add in a lot of the gameplay bugs mentioned and you’d think I’d be still hating FO76 but that isn’t the case.

As is often the case with Bethesda titles the fun in the game can still be found despite all those issues. I admit the game is enjoyable now if you’re able to look past their inability to code UIs and their creaky codebase. It’s too bad true modding isn’t able to fix their shortcomings as it has in every other one if their games.

I’ve put over a hundred hours into the game since the relaunch and am really enjoying myself. I’m utterly shocked that I’m this invested in the game. I loathed it upon release, and haven’t touched it until they released this update. I even admit I’d paid for their stupid sub-service just so I could play with friends and guildmates without having to deal with idiots.

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Blake

Just to clarify … by idiots I mean those that attack and try to provoke players into PVP and have a second person waiting to kill them to steal their stuff. Which is what happened to my friends 10 year old the first time he tried playing the game and he lost like an hours worth of gathering mats(happened to me in the past too but I didn’t engage).

After that, I subbed and he only plays on my server when I’m on — which is fine with his Dad.

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Montjoy Onew

Amen to your second paragraph.
Unfortunately, this time the online nature of it disallows a legion of fans from fixing 90% of their bugs for them.

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Schmidt.Capela

AFAIK there is no game, at all, using this engine or its predecessor that has a good (or even merely not bad) UI, unless you count the player-created replacement UIs (some of which are fairly good).